INFLAGRANTI - Restart

Posted By MiOd On 8:29 AM 0 comments

Track List
01 The Final Countdown (Europe)
02 Restart (Inspired by Vivaldi)
03 Nothing Else Matters (Metallica)
04 Toccata a fuga D moll (Bach)
05 Smoke On The Water (Deep Purple)
06 Yesterday (Beatles)
07 The Best (Tina Turner)
08 Fuego
09 The Winner Takes It All (Abba)
10 CarmenOverture (Bizet)
11 Total Elipse Of The Heart (Bonnie Tyler)
12 Ave Maria (GounodBach)
13 Classic Hitmix
14 Kankan (Offenbach)
15 The Final Countdown (Dance Mix)

HERE

Music from the Hearts of the Masters

Posted By MiOd On 7:35 PM 0 comments
Jack Dejohnette & Foday Musa Suso
Music from the Hearts of the Masters
When Foday Musa Suso teamed with drummer Hamid Drake in the ‘80s to form the Mandingo Griot Society, the usage of kora and the American drum kit was a novelty, and successfully but precariously placed the traditions of African village music and jazz oriented polyrhythms in a new place. Suso and the veteran drummer Jack DeJohnette team up in duets that do not juxtapose, but complement the rhythmic strengths of the different instruments, creating a language of their own. Suso is happy to play the vibrant shimmering melodies his 21-string instrument uniquely brings to the table, while DeJohnette adopts a sensitive, supportive rather than similarly melodic role, forming funky beats, cymbal accents, and colorations that shade rather than drive the music. There are two traditional pieces: "Kaira" sports a repeat melody buoyed by DeJohnette's slight R&B strut, while "Sunjatta Keita" is a simple 4/4 jam. The delicate, organic, minimalist blending of instruments during "Rose Garden" displays an extension of traditions, while the 6/8 "Mountain Love Dance" evokes the kind of magnificent natural sounds you expect from these two. A loose drum solo and kora separate traded-off identities in "Voice of the Kudrus," there's a boogaloo flavor from DeJohnette for "Ocean Wave," and Suso's kora cascades on the danceable and playful "Worldwide Funk." The sound of the hunter's guitar or douss'n gouni is featured on "Ancient Techno." Though DeJohnette is also known for playing piano, hand drums, or electronics, none of that is present here, nor much of a mainstream jazz content. It is a consistent and playful dialogue between two incredible musicians who need no definitions, restrictions, or guidance to make their spare, soulful, diverse, and heartfelt original music happen.

For drummer Jack DeJohnette's second project on his fledgling Golden Beams Productions record label, he moves from the Asian subcontinent south to Africa for a series of duets with master Gambian kora player Foday Musa Suso. While Music from the Hearts of the Masters is, in its own way, as hypnotic as DeJohnette's first release on his label, the meditative Music in the Key of OM, it's also more actively engaging and extroverted.

At first glance the conventional drum kit and the 21-string lute/harp-like kora would appear to make strange bedfellows, especially given that, for the most part, both DeJohnette and Suso work within the traditions that they are most comfortable with. DeJohnette's intuitive sense of swing pervades, while Suso's melodic and harmonic ideas clearly come out of the African folk traditions that comprise his roots. Still, what makes this programme of mostly improvised music—other than two traditional tunes and one Suso composition, everything is credited to both artists—so compelling is that both players are not only looking for common ground, but finding it as well.

This should come as no surprise, given that Suso has a larger musical reach that has seen him in collaboration with artists including Kronos Quartet, Phillip Glass, and Herbie Hancock. In fact, Suso takes a step further, bringing the kora into the 21st Century by utilizing subtle sound processing, as well as more overt use of looping technology to create layers of sound that give the duo a considerably fuller sound. Equally, DeJohnette's reputation and purview may be more firmly rooted in the jazz world, but that's by no means a narrowing definition; it takes a broad world view to work with artists as diverse as Alice Coltrane, Bill Laswell, Wadada Leo Smith, and Keith Jarrett.

But while both artists look for a nexus point, neither is prepared to completely give up his own disposition, making Music from the Hearts of the Masters a unique experience. Suso's kora is so richly textured that it's hard not to be drawn in, while DeJohnette's groove-laden kit work creates an equally inviting space. And while most of the improvisations are based around simple changes, often established by Suso and then looped in order to allow him to layer additional melodies on top, both DeJohnette and Suso are keen listeners who find ways to bridge the seemingly disparate stylistic gaps.

The inherent simplicity of Music from the Hearts of the Masters belies the virtuosity of both DeJohnette and Suso, but it's exactly that level of sophistication that allows the two to make what might appear a self-limiting proposition such a success. A sense of innocence and joy makes this album a spiritual partner with DeJohnette's more introspective Music in the Key of OM. With Golden Beam Productions, DeJohnette is clearly exploring avenues that he'd be less likely to visit with the major labels, and that's good news indeed.

Ocean Wave
Ancient Techno
Rose Garden
Worldwide Funk
Kaira Traditional
Mountain Love Dance
Party
Voice of the Kudrus
Sunjatta Keita

Jack DeJohnette: Drums
Foday Musa Suso: Kora

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Aziz Herawi - Master Of Afghani Lutes

Posted By MiOd On 2:38 PM 0 comments
“An expatriate Afghani currently living in California, Herawi calls himself an amateur musician but is actually a rare performer of the traditional music from the Herat valley in western Afghanistan. As its geography suggests, this area's music is a blend of Persian and Hindustani instruments and styles. The pieces have the varied rhythms of the Hindustani raga forms, but are fairly short (3 to 5 minutes each) and more intense than much Hindustani music. In addition, their melodies are based on the even-tempered 12-tone octave that in recent decades has overtaken the traditional Persian system of microtonal variations. He plays the 14-string dutar, a long-necked lute, and the rebab, a short-necked lute, accompanied by tabla, frame drum, and tambourine that provide a vigorous and dry rhythm for his robust strumming. Herawi's strength is the energy and spontaneity of these instrumental pieces. Rather than refinement or cerebral meditation, there is a healthy share of earthy melodies and passion.”

These splendid performances on the long-necked, 14-string duhar and short-necked rebab (both backed by tabla) reflect the increasing Indian influence on Afghan music. Though Herawi is from Herat, a musical center that once had strong Persian connections, his playing is based on Indian ragas rather than older Afghan maqam, and the tabla playing is also strongly Indian. ~ John Storm Roberts

A: Nagmaha-ye Klasik in Rag Beiru (Instrumentals on dutar)
(01). Jhaptal / Dadra
(02). Kaharwa
(03). Kaharwa / Dadra
(04). Charbeiti Kaharwa
(05). Kaharwa / Dadra II B: (Instrumentals on dutar)
(06). Aushari
(07). Naghma I
(08). Mahali I
(09). Khandan-E Amaturi I
(10). Khandan-E Amaturi II
(11). Khandan-E Amaturi III C: (Instrumentals on rebab)
(12). Naghma-Ye Klasik In Rag Pari
(13). Naghma-Ye Klasik In Rag Pilu
(14). Mahali II
(15). Mahali III
(16). Naghma II
(17). Naghma III

Aziz Herawi - dutar (1-11), rebab (12-17) Ghulam Abbas Khan - tabla Omar Mojaddidi - zirbaghali (15) Azim Mojaddidi - daira zangi (tambourine) Anayat Habibi - daira zangi

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Mercan Dede & Secret Tribe - Nar

Posted By MiOd On 9:35 AM 0 comments
Mercan Dede (translated your grandfather's mustache) a.k.a. Alan Arkin is a modern day genius of composition. He combines New Age with traditional Middle Eastern Sufi instruments, rhythms and melodies. The results are stunning other worldly creations of musical landscapes of caravans, spinning Sufi dancers and traditional belly dancers. Believe me, it takes something to capture my interest away from my love Old Time String Band Music. Mercan Dede did it in a big way. He can and probably will hypnotize you. You won't be disappointed.

1. Nar-i Ney
2. Nar-i Mey
3. Nar-i Yar
4. Nar-i Ask
5. Nar-i Sems
6. Nar-i Can
7. Nar-i Cem
8. Nar-i Seher

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Shiv Kumar Sharma - Antardhwani - The Song Within, Vol. I,II

Posted By MiOd On 7:15 AM 0 comments


Vol I:
1. Mirrors Of Infinity - Raga Antardhwani, Alap
2. The Spaces Of Silence - Raga Antardhwani, Jod

Vol II:
1. Resonances Of Solitude - Raga Antardhwani, Gat In Madhyalya Jhaptala
2. The Song Within - Raga Antardhwani, Gats In Madhyalaya Sitarkhani & Drut Teentala

Shiv Kumar Sharma, Salim Ajmeri, Rahul Sharma, Mukesh Joshi

MP3 Bitrate: 174-191 kbps (VBR) Encoder: LAME 3.98, recorded from internet through Jet Audio

Download I - Download II

IRAN Shusha: Persian Love Songs and Mystic Chants

Posted By MiOd On 3:26 AM 0 comments
It has been said that Shusha possesses "the dark beauty of Persia and a voice to match." This recording, dedicated entirely to her Persian roots, captures a performance of exquisitely beautiful songs of love, betrothal, separation and mystical wisdom, sung in the intimate and sensitive style that has made Shusha an internationally known performer. The songs of an ancient and noble civilization; the bonding of thousands of shared visions. Bask in the richness of the flute and zarb accompaniment and immerse yourself in the cool, soothing timbre of Shusha's voice.

Shusha has an incredible voice - earthy and pure - so beautiful that it stands alone and can carry a song without any accompanying instruments at all. I am studying Farsi and have spent a great deal of time trying to find Persian music that fills my soul. So much Persian music has a production value I don't care for, rendering the music rather cheap and tinny-sounding (the organs! those strings!). But this album, with Shusha's sublime voice, accompanied by simple acoustic instruments captures all of the beauty of the Persian culture.

01. The Silver Gun
02. The Wheat Flower
03. Rain
04. The Stars in Heaven
05. On Top of the Hill
06. The Siken Handkerchief
07. Darling Leyli
08. I Have Come to Ravish My Betrothed
09. The Lor Youth
10. Lullaby
11. Girl From the Boyer Ahmadi Tribe
12. My Beloved is Short
13. The Water-Pipe
14. You Must Come To Me
15. Darling Dareyne
16. Masnavi

Shusha Guppy : vocals
Duncan Lamont : flute
Behboudi : zarb

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Treasure Edition: Traditional Ensemble "2"

Posted By MiOd On 12:37 AM 0 comments
Treasure Edition: Series on Famous Chinese Musicians And Best-Known Music In The Twentieth Century

(01).Spring River and Flowers at the Moonlit Night
(02).The Moon Reflected in the Second Spring
(03).The Clouds Chasing the Moon
(04).A Happy Year
(05).Three-Six (San-Liu)
(06).A Spring Morning on the Emerald Lake
(07).Prince Qin Breaking through the Enemy Array
(08).Beijing Opera Tune
(09).Axi Dancing in the Moon Light
(10).Days of Emancipation
(11).The General،¯s Order (Jiang-jun-ling)

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Pancho Quinto - En el Solar la Cueva del Humo

Posted By MiOd On 1:53 PM 0 comments
Pancho Quinto is a master of the bata, the Yoruba ceremonial drum, as well as of the quinto, the lead drum used in the rumba, which has its roots in the Cross River Delta among the Efik and the Efo.

Interviewed on his ‘98 tour to the US, Pancho said: ” I play a polyrhythmic rumba. I never go outside the Cuban rumba, and I play that perfectly, but I add to it, as if I had a whole drum set in my hands. And I play many instruments, like cajon , bata, bells.” Recent album: “En el Solar la Cueva del Humo,” with Round World.

Quinto continues to pay bata at toques and his group is called Añagi: “this is the name of my saint in the Yoruba religion. He is a boy, a mischievous boy, but he’s good, and I love him a lot and respect him.

Pancho Quinto is pleased by the reception he got on his ‘98 American tour and speaks happily of the collaboration with Bellita, a young pop-jazz pianist who trades songs with him and sometimes sings along on his numbers. At 65, Quinto is becoming famous: ” I have played all my life. I worked on hte docks, but I always lived with the music and never left it. I taught other groups that traveled and became famous, but I kept on working, as a modest person, more as a teacher than a performer. ” Quinto was in the US several years ago with Yoruba Andabo, a group known for its rumba and strong Congo music.

“I never wanted to be famous, but now that I am old, now my destiny wants to make me famous. But I don’t care about that. I don’t want to be Nat King Cole or anybody. I am just a humble man, playing for my people, for Cuba, and for all the people of Latin America and all over the world.”

1. Lenguasá
2. El Errante
3. La Media Vuelta
4. En El Solar La Cueva Del Humo
5. La Rana
6. Ajiaco Cubano
7. Tiembla Tierra
8. El Cisme Blanco
9. El Sinsonte

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JAPAN: Joji Hirota and the Taiko Drummers: Japanese Taiko

Posted By MiOd On 7:29 AM 0 comments
Joji Hirota
Percussionist, composer, singer, flautist - Joji Hirota joyously eludes definition. Trained as a classical musician in Japan, he has now spent over half his life in England freely blending instruments and influences to create a music that is uniquely his own. His flute sounds like singing, his singing sounds instrumental and his drums sound like nothing on earth.

Real World recording artist, Joji Hirota, studied music at Kyoto Arts University and 'taiko' drumming with Itto Obba in Hokkaido, North Japan. As a composer, musical director and multi-instrumentalist, he has forged a highly successful career, specialising in the use of the traditional ceremonial 'taiko' drums within a broad contemporary synthesis which embraces musical styles of East and West.

As a Real World recording artist, he performs regularly at WOMAD festivals around the world, whilst creating music for a number of TV and theatre productions.

1. Harvest, for taiko drum ensemble
2. Pageant, for taiko drum ensemble
3. Haru-Ichiban, for taiko drum ensemble
4. Musashi Mai Uchi
5. Hokkai II, for taiko drum ensemble
6. Chido-Setsu, for taiko drum ensemble
7. Suisei-Hanabi, for taiko drum ensemble
8. Heart Beat, for taiko drum ensemble
9. Yuki Jizoh, for taiko drum ensemble

Ape (EAC Rip): 280 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 155 MB | Front Cover

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Ilaiyaraaja - Thiruvasagam

Posted By MiOd On 7:17 PM 0 comments
"Muthu Natraman" is the only song in the album that has been sung by singers other than the Maestro. While the song comes across as a very cheerful one, a peeve, however, is that these guys lack the clarity in pronunciation that is so evident in the other numbers sung by IR. The music is mind blowing and jus grows onto you slowly. The prelude is awesome. "Putril Vaazh aravum anjaen", is mesmerizing, right from the word go. IR's monologue right at the beginning of the song is bound to put off many a listener, but that can be pardoned for the song as a whole. The tune is great, interludes just perfect! "Polla vinayen", the longest piece is out of the world in some parts, good in most other parts. IR's voice rocks in "Pooeru konnum purandhararum", but doesn't suit this number? when he sings in the high pitches, the age shows. This is the only song that has English words accompanying IR's rendering in Tamil, and the English and Tamil parts have been interleaved very well. The high pitch singing of Ray Harcourt along with the orchestra is divine. It reaches an exhilarating climax towards the end, when they start singing the "Namachivaya vaazgha"! "Pooeru konnum purandhararum" is sung by Bhavatharini & IR. She does a good job of it, with neat diction and good expressions. Towards the end when both of them sing together, the harmony is excellent. "Poovar senni mannan" is also great, and IR's voice fits perfectly here. The tempo is very good.. His diction is jus perfect! The loud chorus/instruments or whatever in the background gives a very good effect. "Umbargatkarase" is a very slow number. IR's voice is extremely expressive, as it is in all the songs, for most part of the song. There is very little instrument in the background and its jus IR's voice that brings in the depth of emotions very beautifully. Because of its pace, this number may not find a fan following. Overall, TiS is definitely a unique, one of its kind album that will not disappoint!

To understand the magnitude/enormity of this album, I was just wondering as follows: did Manickavasagar think of a great genius Ilaiyaraaja who would be born several centuries later, when he wrote Tiruvasakam ?

NO - it was all written extempore - for Ilaiyaraaja to choose some verses of this work, set music to them, make it in a format that is middle of the line between Indian and Western classical, also accomodate perfectly a score that would involve/require a full-fledged Symphony orchestra, not only manage to retain the Bhakti(devotion) element, but drench it with Bhakti and also stamp his own trademark elements - OOPS, no science can explain this phenomenal accomplishment !!

Just imagine if Ilaiyaraaja were to compose an entire symphonic work with melodic tunes and lines desgined to bring out the Bhakti element and then Manickavasagar were to come alive and then write lyrics, words for that symphony - it would be 'n' times more powerful than the score that has come out!

Keeping the above in perspective, for Ilaiyaraaja to have come up with a score that goes beyond the limitations imposed by the imprompu format of the verses, is something I have no capacity to understand

Indian mysticism, spiritual traditions are centered around the concept of birth and death caught in a continous cylce - and SOUND plays an essential role in Indian metaphysical concepts

Ilaiyaraaja has brought expression to these mystical concepts using music with mind blowing use of Western classical and Indian
classical idioms, straddling a middle path and the result is
indescribable

We live in a world where even modern science says 'Everything is a system, even elementary particles (if you believe string theory)!!'

Throughout his musical career, be it in his film compositions or
non-film albums, Ilaiyaraaja has adventurously explored 'n' number of idioms, genres, and proven time and again that 'music is also a system' and cannot be differentiated into one genre or class and by debunking all existing norms, he has given rise to his own systems approach to music, where the output symbolises the systems approach that 'the whole is greater than the sum of parts!'

With "TIRUVASAGAM By Ilayaraja", he takes his self-created systems approach to music to an all-time high!

For everyone around the world, with or without a modicum of interest in music, or, art, "TIRUVASAGAM By Ilayaraja" is a must ! for your collections

More than a decade ago, Joseph Eagar of the New York Philharmonic
Orchestra prophesised thus "This man's (Maestro.Ilaiyaraaja) music will be heard throughout the world over the next millennium."

With "TIRUVASAGAM By Ilayaraja", perhaps that prophecy is about to be fulfilled - make sure you listen to the entire album
without getting disturbed, using a good sound system with at least 1000W output or better, use a good pair of headphones - you will then realise what I am talking about

Overall, a product that shall stand the test of time and enthrall millions!

(01) Poovaar Senni Mannan
(02) Polla Vinayen
(03) Pooerukonum Purantharanum
(04) Umbarkatkarasey
(05) Muthu Natramam
(06) Puttril Vazh Aravum Anjen

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L. Subramaniam & Stephane Grappelli - Conversations

Posted By MiOd On 4:41 PM 0 comments
Although fellow violinist Stephane Grappelli is billed as co-leader, this is very much L. Subramaniam's date. All eight compositions (except for Grappelli's solo piano rendition of his "Tribute to Mani") are by Subramaniam, and the music (which utilizes electronics, modern rhythms, and the influence of Mani's Indian heritage) is quite unusual for a Grappelli session. Altoist Frank Morgan helps out on "Memories," and other sidemen include such notables as keyboardist Joe Sample and guitarist Jorge Strunz. The contrast between the two surprisingly complementary violinists is a strong reason to acquire this CD.

Don't Leave Me
Memories
Paganini Caprice 5
Conversation
Walking in a Dream
Illusion
Tribute to Mani
French Resolution

Flac tracks (EAC Rip): 240 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 95 MB | Covers

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Belly Dance Hommage A Baligh Hamdi

Posted By MiOd On 12:20 PM 0 comments
Born Baligh Abdel Hamid Hamdi Morsi in October 7, 1932 Shubra district of Cairo. His father was a professor of physics at King Fuad I University (now Cairo University). He learned to play the violin at age nine, and the oud two or three years later. He took music lessons with a variety of teachers throughout childhood and teenage years. He became a professional musician in 1954 at age 22. Immediately prior to that, he had been a law student, and he chose to not complete the studies for the law degree.

He started his musician career as singer. But very soon he turned to composing, and his compositions got good acceptance in the mid-1950s. In the late 1950s the then-famous Oum Kalthoum sang his composition El Hob Eih and it was a hit. Some other of Baligh Hamdi's early compositional successes include "Why no", sung by Faydah Kamel, the song "Ma Thbinish Be Al Shakl Dah (Don't love me like that)" by Fayza Ahmed and the song "Tkhounoh ([How do you] Betray [my heart])" by Abdel Halim Hafez. For the next two decades he was one of the most popular, successful, and productive composers in the Arab world

Baligh Hamdi frequently said that he drew upon musical ideas and aesthetics in Egyptian folk melodies and rhythms in composing his songs. He also drew on ideas that were floating around in the contemporary music of his time. His sound has a classical flavor due to the heavy use of the string orchestra. But he also made some use of electronic keyboards and guitars in harmony with the strings, or alternating with the strings, in many songs.
His best work is published as recordings under the name of the singer. The singers include Oum Kalthoum, Abdel Halim Hafez, Shadia, Layla Murad, Fayza Ahmed, Aziza Jalal, Warda (he was married to Warda for about a decade), Sabah ( he was one of her husbands), Mayada Al-Henawy, and other singers.


Track List
01 Qissat Hob (Love Story)
02 Salamat
03 Zay El Hawa
04 Esmaouni
05 Hikaiti Maa Elghram
06 Chaka Chiko
07 Mawoud
08 Sawah (The Wanderer)
09 Min Elqahira
10 Khallik Hena (Intoroduction)
11 Hawel Teftakerni

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MAROC MUSIQUE CLASSIQUE

Posted By MiOd On 10:03 AM 0 comments
MAROC MUSIQUE CLASSIQUE
Congres Du Caire 1932
Cheikh Mohamed Chouika & Omar Jaidi
Le Congrès du Caire de 1932
A la fin des années 1920, au Caire, les mélomanes constatent la décadence de la musique classique arabe. Assouplissements, corruption, inculture, disent-ils, appelant de leur voeux un modernisme inspiré de la musique occidentale, déjà largement diffusée au Caire. La ville possède un opéra et plusieurs écoles de musique. Accompagnant l'émergeance des mouvements nationalistes panarabes, musiciens et musicologues cherchent à créer un mode, ou maqâm, unique pour tous les pays de la zone (l'équivalent, en tant que principe unificateur de la gamme occidentale. Les traditions de ces pays différemment pourtant profondément. Le maqâm permettrait de jouer différemment une musique identique de Damas à Marrakech, de Tunis au Caire. Poussant le jeu plus loin, certains théoriciens proposent de mettre au point une échelle tonale universelle, utilisée à la fois par l'Orient et par l'Occident.

Fin 1929, le gouvernement égyptien inaugure l'Institut Oriental de Musique, et le roi Fouad décide de marquer le coup. "Tous les compositeurs, tous les musiciens ambulants et tous les improvisateurs de l'Islam y seront convoqués avec leurs instruments de musique. Nous débattrons du meilleur moyen de développer le meilleur le génie musical de nos races, en conservant les vieilles traditions tout en suscitant de nouvelles originalités créatrices". Sachant également que les théories musicales de ces cultures sont différentes (le congrès du Caire (en 1932) a mis en évidence des disparités sensibles dans les échelles (toutes non tempérées), et dans le moyen de les construire), les instruments de musique montrent des particularités selon l'aire d'usage, utilisant des gammes propres chacune à ces musiques respectives (par exemple dans la flûte ney les micro intervalles nécessaires pour rendre parfaitement ces échelles sont obtenus en éloignant légèrement la flûte de l'axe de la bouche). La justesse obtenue est remarquable de précision, c'est d'ailleurs indispensable puisque la mélodie dans la modalité non tempérée ne supporte pas d'approximations s'agissant de la justesse. Le Congrès du Caire de 1932, qui constitue une avancée majeure dans l'histoire de la musique arabe, contribue, tant bien que mal, à la standardisation d'un système modal reconnu par toutes les musiques arabes. Le système proposé au Congrès est basé principalement sur une échelle générale de vingt quatre notes à distance de quart de ton. Mais cette normalisation n'admettant qu'un seul référencement tendrait à négliger les spécificités locales de chacune de ces musiques.

Le roi demande au Baron Rodolphe d'Erlanger de mettre sur pied le premier concrès Congrès de musique arabe, qui s'ouvre le 28 mars 1932. Il y travaille avec l'aide de musiciens tunisiens et proche-orientaux ainsi que du baron Carra de Vaux. Malheureusement, sa santé ne lui permet pas de se rendre au Caire pour participer au congrès et il décède le 29 octobre de la même année.

Ce rassemblement a permis de constater que l'échelle musicale utilisée par les musulmans orientaux est foncièrement différente de la gamme en usage chez les musulmans du Maghreb. Ces derniers - sans doutes au contact avec de l'Europe durant leur séjour en Espagne - ont adopté une échelle sensiblement analogue à la gamme dite naturelle que l'oeuvre de Jean Sébastien Bach et l'usage des instruments à clavier ont rendu tempérée du contraire des Turcs, des syriens, des irakiens, et les égyptiens demeurés fidèles à des habitudes millénaires qui ont conservé un goût prononcé pour des intervalles inférieurs au demi ton.

Le Congrès du Caire de 1932, qui constitue une avancée majeure dans l'histoire de la musique arabe, contribue, tant bien que mal, à la standardisation d'un système modal reconnu par toutes les musiques arabes. Le système proposé au Congrès est basé principalement sur une échelle générale de vingt quatre notes à distance de quart de ton. Mais cette normalisation n'admettant qu'un seul référencement tendrait à négliger les spécificités locales de chacune de ces musiques. (Mohammed Zied Zouari - Projet de thèse : L'évolution du langage musical tunisien à travers le temps. L'impact du Congrès du Caire de 1932).

Dans le Proche-Orient arabe, la musique traditionnelle, savante et populaire, s'étend sur un espace géographiquement vaste et hétérogène et touche plusieurs millions d'êtres humains. Des traditions populaires, régionales ou trans-régionales, côtoient de grandes traditions savantes qui sont aussi bien panarabes, comme les mouashah, interprétés dans tous les centres urbains, que locales, propres à des centres urbains particuliers, comme Alep, Damas, Bagdad, Mossoul, ou d'autres cités qui représentent chacune une école, avec des caractéristiques et un style reconnus. En général, une différence de perception avec le monde moderne se situe d'abord au niveau de la définition même de la musique. La musique traditionnelle est enracinée dans une vaste réalité sociale et culturelle aux significations complexes, dans laquelle l'aspect sonore n'est qu'un élément aux côtés des éléments poétiques et gestuels. Être ensemble, communiquer et transmettre l'émoi, vivre la créativité esthétique en groupe est essentiel pour la musique dans les sociétés arabes. Ces conceptions contribuent à transmettre les valeurs, les préceptes sociaux, spirituels et esthétiques. (Tradition et modernisme, Le cas de la musique arabe au Proche-Orient - Schéhérazade Qassim Hassan Paris ).

Cheikh Hadj Larbi Ben Sari (1863-1964); musicien, compositeur algérien, pédagogue, figure emblématique, il fut le doyen de la musique arabo-andalouse algérienne et fut invité à ce congrès où il fit entendre les œuvres de l'école de Tlemcen, inspirées, par la musique gharnati.

(La Musique Classique Marocaine Congrès du Caire 1932)

(01). Alboghia et tab'
(02). Touchia
(03). Ahlan bikoum
(04). Hibbi ma'i
(05). Youm ajib
(06). Qamar takamel
(07). Oj bilhima
(08). Kijani qamar
(09). Kol men yahoua
(10). Aini lighairi jamalikoum
(11). Ghaibatek - Touchia
(12). Sabahna Fir - Rawdi
(13). Ya ochaq qad a'ya sabri
(14). Ahda nassim assaba
(15). Malet ethouraya
(16). Hibbi hina narmaqou
(17). Joul tara elmaani
(18). Atani zamani
(19). Entoum maqsidi
(20). Fala qouwata endi

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Royal Court Music of Thailand

Posted By MiOd On 3:21 AM 0 comments
Reticent yet dynamic, sophisticated and delicate, this recording contains four cherished and exquisite compositions performed with an enchanting mix of xylophones, gongs, cymbals, fiddles, guitars, and breathtaking vocals. Instrumental and vocal music of the Thai classical repertoire draws listeners into a realm of ornate tonal variations and textured rhythms. Recorded in 1994 in Bangkok, this studio recording features musicians of the Bangkok College of Dramatic Arts Fine Arts Department, performing the traditional and highly refined music of the Thai royal court. (The Savvy Traveller)

1. Sounds of the Surf Ouverture
Pleng Homrong Kleun Kratob Fang
Composed by His Majesty King Prajadhipok, Rama VII
Performed by the Piphat Mai Khaeng Ensemble

2. The Floating Moon
Pleng Bulan Loy Luen
Composed by His Majesty King Phra Buddha Lertla Napalai, Rama II
Performed by the Piphat Mai Nuam Ensemble

3. A Starlit Night
Pleng Ratri Pradab Dao Thao
Composed by His Majesty King Prajadhipok, Rama VII
Performed by the Krueng Sai Ensemble

4. Heart of the Sea
Pleng Ok Thalay Thao
Composed by Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn & Choi Suntharavathin.
Performed by the Mahori Ensemble

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Carles Benavent & Josemi Carmona - Sumando

Posted By MiOd On 3:47 PM 0 comments
"Sumando", a happy encounter between flamenco and jazz
CARLES BENAVENT JOSEMI CARMONA
"Sumando"
Sumando no es una combinación caprichosa ni una reunión de virtuosos. Es un ente orgánico que supone el más importante paso de los últimos años hacia la gran música flamenca del futuro.

Música instrumental. El bajista Carles Benavent y el guitarrista Josemi Carmona (ex-Ketama) se prometieron hace años que harían un disco mano a mano. Tras dos años de trabajo, 'Sumando' es el resultado, un disco que equilibra la calidad como compositores e intérpretes de ambos músicos, activos protagonistas de la renovación del flamenco en las últimas décadas. Destacan las colaboraciones del cantaor Diego el Cigala y el pianista Chick Corea, en estos nuevos nueve temas, aderezados por una nutrida nómina de percusionistas.

Carles Benavent and Josemi Carmona have locked themselves up in a recording studio and have recorded "Sumando", a happy encounter between flamenco and jazz. Each of them contributes what he has learnt during a long musical career; the end product are nine songs that do not stray from the rhytmic pattern or the emotion of flamenco. Chick Corea and Diego are featured as special guest artists.

"Sumando" (Adding) is the first joint work by Carles Benavent and Josemi Carmona. The jazz bass player and the guitarist of Ketama have brought together their wide-ranging musical experiences to bring to life a flamenco-jazz record. It features nine themes that were composed and performed by themselves, with the accompaniment of other renowned musicians, from both the jazz and flamenco scenes, among whom those who stand out are Chick Corea and Diego el Cigala.

In "Sumando", the bass and guitar are the protagonists of this happy coming together. However, these instruments and musicians are backed by other musicians such as Jorge Pardo (flute), Tino di Geraldo (drum kit), Juan Carmona Jr. (percussion), Bandolero (palmas, rhythmic hand-clapping) and Piraña (percussion). Moreover, Carles Benavent also plays the Ebow, keyboards, mandola and cittern; and Josemi Carmona plays the flamenco guitar, the acoustic guitar, the mandola and palmas.

Benavent and Carmona contribute everything they have learnt during their long musical careers to "Sumando". Carles started to open up new horizons for current Spanish music in the 1970s with the band Música Urbana. Since then, he has become a reference on the jazz and flamenco-jazz scenes. His works have had an international repercussion through his cooperation with Miles Davis, Paco de Lucía, Quincy Jones and Chick Corea.

Josemi Carmona possesses all the flamenco flavour of the Habichuelas and contributes all the baggage from his time in Ketama. And Josemi was able to add the experience of his encounters with international musicians like Toumani Diabate, Danny Thompson, Michel Camilo, Cheb Khaled and Caetano Veloso, among others, to the cross-breeding that Ketama’s flamencoised salsa pop already represented. Furthermore, "Sumando" is Josemi’s first recording work after Ketama.

01. Sencillito 3:01
(J. M. Carmona)

Josemi, guitarra y palmas
Carles, bajo
Bandolero, percusión
Joselin Vargas y Bandolero, palmas

02. La garza 6:22
(C. Benavent)

Carles, bajo, ebow y teclados
Josemi, guitarra
Chaboli, percusión
Tino Di Geraldo, batería

03. Dama 4:46
(J. M. Carmona - V. Castro)

Josemi, guitarra, guitarra acústica, coros y palmas
Carles, bajo y coros
Diego el Cigala, cante
Piraña, percusión
Joselin Vargas y Bandolero, palmas

04. Skely 3:37
(C. Benavent)

Carles, bajo, cittern y silbido
Josemi, guitarra, programación, teclados y palmas
Juan Carmona Jr., percusión
Joselin Vargas y Bandolero, palmas

05. Soleó 5:05
(J. M. Carmona)

Josemi, guitarra, guitarra acústica, teclados, programación y palmas
Carles, bajo
Chick Corea, piano eléctrico

06. Amic Joan 4:32
(C. Benavent)

Carles, bajo
Josemi, guitarra y palmas
Jorge Pardo, flauta
Bandolero, percusión
Joselin Vargas y Bandolero, palmas

07. El Galleta 4:31
(J. M. Carmona - J. A. Sánchez - J. Carmona)

Josemi, guitarra, guitarra acústica, mandola, programación, teclados y palmas
Carles, bajo
Paquete, voz
Bandolero, percusión
Joselin Vargas y Bandolero, palmas

08. Okinawa 3:45
(C. Benavent)

Carles, bajo y mandola
Josemi, guitarra, guitarra acústica y programación
Tino Di Geraldo, batería

09. Lupeando (a la memoria de Jaco) 3:29
(C. Benavent)

10.Lupeando II

Carles, bajo y programación
Josemi, guitarra acústica, programación y palmas
Tino Di Geraldo, batería


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The Bulgarian Voices 'Angelite' - Fly, fly my sadness

Posted By MiOd On 1:06 PM 0 comments
The Bulgarian Voices Angelite feat. Huun-Huur-Tu,
Sergey Starostin & Mikhail Alperin
Fly, Fly My Sadness
In the 1990s, it was discovered that the Bulgarian and the Tuvan people have the same roots, both originally inhabiting Central Asia. Because of great migrations more than 1,500 years ago, the original Tuvan somehow split in two groups; a group ended in what is now known as Bulgaria and the other in what is today Tuva. Because of numerous assimilations, Bulgarian people got assimilated to the Slav of the Balkan and the Tuvan to Mongolian tribes. As is obvious, the music of both groups evolved quite differently, yet both are fascinating. It was Mikhail Alperin who had the original idea of bringing together a Bulgarian choir with a Tuvan group. Here they are: the Bulgarian Choir Angelite and Huun-Huur-Tu -- two distant "cousins" meeting again after more than a thousand years, but this time through music. Alperin wrote all of the compositions, based on Bulgarian, Tuvan, and Russian traditions. The results are absolutely mesmerizing. This CD is a vocal meditation of the most divine spirituality, deeply grounded in more than 1,000-year-old traditions.

1. Fly, Fly My Sadness - trad./arr. M.Alperin - Solo: Sonya Iovkova/Kagal-ool Khovalyg
2. Legend - M.Alperin - Melodica Solo: Mikhail Alperin
3. Wave - M.Alperin - Solo: Sergey Starostin
4. Lonely Bird - trad./arr. M.Alperin - Sonya Iovkova/Anatoly Kuular
5. Mountain Story - M.Alperin

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Oynamaya Geldik -Trakya Dance Party

Posted By MiOd On 10:39 AM 0 comments
Burhan Ocal & The Trakya All Stars featuring Smadj
Oynamaya Geldik
Track List: 1. Kara Cali 04:00 2. Karabiber 03:46 3. Kayinco 04:46 4. Opaz 05:15 5. Hovarda Mustafa 03:07 6. Sülo 03:04 7. Süpheli Ask 01:34 8. Zigos 02:59 9. Limoncu 05:03 10. Isirgan Otu 04:38 11. Smadj'la Sohbet 02:23 12. Opaz (Smadj Mix 05:19 Vurmal? Çalgilar, Piyano: Burhan Öcal; Elektronik Ritimler ve Programlama: Smadj; Trakya All Stars: Zurna: Sarayli Ahmet; Trompet: Soma'li Saffet; Darbuka: Ümit Adakale; Davul: Faruk Giley; Kanun: Mehmet Çeliksu; Keman: ?smail Papis; Cümbüs: Ahmet Demirkiran; Klarnet: Yasar Çakirlar; Saksafon: Bülent Ustaoglu; Trombon Hasan Gözetlik; Dem Zurna: Soydan Kayikçi; Vokal: Yüksel Zar; Vokal: Burcu Bas

Burhan Ocal's instruments are as diverse as his music. In addition to a wide variety of percussion, such as the Darbuka (a vase-shaped drum played with the fingers), he is a highly skilled player on a number of stringed instruments, including the Divan-Saz, Tanbur and Ud. His expressive voice adds to the spectrum of musical elements at his command.

Since 1977, Burhan Ocal has divided his time between Istanbul and Zurich, Switzerland. He has become widely known for touring and recording with his Oriental Ensemble, which performs traditional gypsy and Turkish folk music. Seeking out a range of world-class collabolators, he has also performed with Maria, Joao Pires, keyboard specialist Joe Zawinul and, more recently, guitarist Eliot Fisk. He appears regularly with his own jazz band, the Burhan Ocal Group, and as a guest artist with George Gruntz Concert Jazz Band from Switzerland. His newest projects including the formation of the duo with the remarkable Australian pianist Peter Waters and, his most unusual venture, the creation of a Oriental/Funk/Hip-Hop band with the American bass players Jamaladeen Tacuma.

HERE

Grece-Epire: Takoutsia, Musiciens de Zagori

Posted By MiOd On 2:45 PM 0 comments
La musique traditionnelle de l'Épire, au nord-ouest de la Grèce, est Indispensable à toute festivité, elle anime les mariages, les baptêmes et les fêtes de village. La clarinette est l'instrument emblématique de l'Epire. Son expression dramatique et son traitement virtuose ne laissent pas de fasciner. Enregistré en 1986, l'Ensemble Takoutsia du village de Zagori rassemblait alors les musiciens de la famille Kapsalis, dont seul subsiste aujourd'hui Grigoris, considéré comme l'un des plus grands virtuoses de la clarinette. On entendra notamment un merveilleux miroloi, longue pièce instrumentale de funérailles pour clarinette, violon et luth ainsi que des danses et des chants de table.

Ce disque présente trois catégories de musique traditionnelle de l'Epire: musique funéraire Miroloï, musique de danse et chants de table. Les deux premières catégories font appel à des formations instrumentales: le Miroloï est exécuté par une clarinette, un violon et un luth, auxquels s'ajoute pour la musique de danse, un tambourin qui en souligne la structure rythmique. Pour l'exécution des chants de table, on a recours à une seconde clarinette qui remplace en partie la première puisque, dans ce répertoire, le premier clarinettiste se transforme en chanteur.

Comme dans l'ensemble des Balkans et dans la majeure partie du bassin méditerranéen, les échelles qui sous-tendent les mélodies de l'Epire sont de type modal. Dans bien des cas, certains des degrés de ces échelles sont mobiles, c'est-à-dire se déplacent légèrement selon que la ligne mélodique est ascendante ou descendante. Autres caractéristiques: la transition d'un mode à un autre au sein d'un même morceau qui a pour effet de susciter un changement d'atmosphère sonore; enfin l'ornementation — le plus souvent improvisée — qui rend plus dense la texture de la mélodie.

Dans ces musiques, l'organisation du temps procède de trois manières: soit le flux rythmique est libre, c'est-à-dire n'est pas tributaire d'un ordonnancement métrique régulier (c'est le cas du Miroloï); soit le rythme prend appui sur des matrices prédéterminées et très rigoureusement étalonnées (musiques de danse); soit les deux types précédents alternent: c'est ce qui caractérise les «chants de table».

1. Miroloï, musique funéraire [22:59]
2. Ilios, danse traditionnelle [6:34]
3. Kyra Frossini, chant de table [3:56]
4. Zagorissio, danse traditionnelle [4:21]
5. Otan anthisoun ta klaria, chant de table [5:37]
6. Arvanitiko, danse traditionnelle [2:56]

TAKOUTSIA, musiciens de Zagori
Grigoris Kapsalis, clarinette et chant
Zacharia Drambalos, clarinette
Spiros Kapsalis, luth
Kosta Kapsalis, violon
Michalis Markopoulos, tambourin
Zoulis Kapsalis, tambourin

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Raga Ragam (A Hindustani & Carantic Duet)

Posted By MiOd On 2:04 PM 0 comments
Gaurav Mazumdar & Jayanthi Kumaresh
RAgA Ragam (A Hindustani & Carantic Duet)
Gaurav Mazumdar, sitar
One of the most sought-after and versatile musicians of the present generation, Gaurav Mazumdar hails from a family of well-known musicians of Allahabad (India). His early career in music began with vocal music, then violin taught by his uncle J.D.Mazumdar , cousins Kamala Bose and Jayashree Roy , father Dulal Mazumdar and Pandit Nandkishore Vishwakarma.

Pandit Ravi Shankar discovered him and encouraged him to learn the sitar, and under this legend's tutelage & guidance, Gaurav has become an accomplished sitarist.

His performances have been widely acclaimed and appreciated by the audiences at various musical events such as Music Academy – Chennai , Saptak Festival in Ahmedabad, Gunidas Sangeet Sammelan in New Delhi , Soorya Festival in Trivandrum, Sankat Mochan in Varanasi, World Music Festival in Rome, Queen Elizabeth Hall in London , Cologne Philharmonic-Germany and Metropolitan Museum-New York to name just a few. His musical journey has spanned several parts of Asia, Australia, Europe, Africa and America, also performing on occasions with his guru Pandit Ravi Shankar.

He is renowned for his solo recitals with some of the best-known tabla players, which include Pandit Kishan Maharaj, Kumar Bose, Anindo Chatterjee, Jayanto Bose and Jugalbandis with both North Indian and Carnatic (South Indian) musicians - Jayanthi Kumaresh, Chitraveena Ravi Kiran, Lalgudi G.J.R.Krishnan and Flute Shashank.

Gaurav's versatility and genius is reflected through numerous collaborations with western musicians such as Daniel Hope, Philip Glass and Kenny Werner . He has also composed and performed with the English Chamber Orchestra . He composed music for the Ballet Siddhartha – a book by Nobel laureate Hermann Hesse and a score titled 'Akanksha' for his concert at the Vatican to celebrate the new Millennium – being the first Indian musician to perform at the Vatican.

He has several albums featuring his classical, collaborative and compositional works such as ‘Echoes from India',' In Search of Peace', 'Neemrana', 'Soul Strings', 'Grammy nominated 'East Meets West', 'Orion' recorded live at the historic concert in the Acropolis in Greece to commemorate the Olympics 2004, ‘Gaurav Mazumdar', “Offerings”, ‘Strings in Harmony', ‘Walking Together' , ‘Shambala' - a historic sitar/violin double concerto, 'Colours from the Rainbow'- composition for western orchestra and most recent 'Hesse'.

Today, Gaurav as a performer, composer and teacher, has secured an important position in the field of music as one of the foremost musicians of his generation.

Being a product of the traditional Guru-Shishya parampara (Teacher – Disciple learning tradition), he devotes a substantial amount of his time to teaching disciples from all over the world.

1. Raga Kalavati
Valachi-Aochar & Gat in Teental / Adi Taalam

2. Raga Yaman & Kalyani
Alap, Jor, Jhala / Ragam, Tanam Gat / Pallavi In Jhaptal / Khanda-chapu Taalam

3. Bhajan
Vaishnava Jana To

Gaurav Mazumdar - Sitar
Jayanthi Kumaresh - Veena
Debasish Mukherjee - Tabla
Satish Kumar - Mridangam

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Ray Conniff - Love Theme / Alone Again

Posted By MiOd On 8:29 AM 0 comments
Love Theme from "The Godfather"/Alone Again (Naturally)
In 2004, Collectables' reissued two of Ray Conniff's 1972 albums, Love Theme from "The Godfather" and Alone Again (Naturally), on one CD -- one CD that contained no new liner notes, just the front covers reproduced in miniature, and the contents of the two albums reproduced in total. Like many easy listening and adult pop musicians, Ray Conniff turned toward modern pop and rock songwriters in the early '70s in an effort to stay contemporary, which is not necessarily the same thing as getting hip -- although that may have been part of the plan, as well. In any case, Conniff tackled such current hits as "Hurting Each Other," "A Horse with No Name," and "Without You," as well as such songwriters as Sonny Bono, on his 1972 album Love Theme from "The Godfather," treating them to arrangements that had grown familiar to any fan of Conniff or easy listening in the '70s. Conniff had backed away from the more interesting tricks and turns of his work a decade earlier, and had settled into sweet, syrupy orchestral arrangements graced by airy, relentlessly sunny harmony vocals pulled from a Mitch Miller album. a record like this is primarily of interest to latter-day listeners anxious to discover a new piece of kitsch, and while a quick scan of the songs suggests that this would be great kitsch, it's entirely too MOR to be worth a chuckle, outside of a take on "Theme from 'Shaft'" that is so ridiculous, it feels like Conniff and crew were in on the joke -- after all, who could sing a line "who's the black private dick who's a sex machine to all the crazy chicks?" without realizing it was silly?

Love Theme's follow-up, Alone Again (Naturally), was the third of Ray Conniff's three albums of contemporary pop hits in 1972, and it's the one that feels most like contemporary AM pop from the early '70s, partially because Conniff spices up his arrangements a little and partially because there's a wider variety of styles on this album, from Gilbert O'Sullivan's deceptively catchy title song, to Donna Fargo's country-pop "The Happiest Girl in the Whole USA"; Anthony Newley's show-stopping kitsch "The Candy Man," and Looking Glass' quintessential "Brandy (You're a Fine Girl)." Since there's more variety here than there was on the preceding Love Theme from "The Godfather," Conniff has the opportunity to write some more interesting arrangements -- the spare electric guitar opening of "Song Sung Blue," the punctuating horns on "Where Is the Love" -- which makes this a more engaging listen than its predecessor. Nevertheless, this album, like the last, is firmly entrenched in MOR easy listening, designed to be background listening and succeeding at that. It's a period piece, nothing more, nothing less.

These two albums from the early 1970's feature Ray Conniff's orchestral and vocal arrangements of contemporary tunes such as Climax's "Precious And Few," America's "A Horse With No Name," Neil Diamond's "Song Song Blue" and "Day By Day" from "Godspell." "Love Theme" originally hit #144 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart in 1972, and "Alone Again" went as high as #180.

01. Speak Softly Love [Love Theme from The Godfather, Pt. 3]
02. Hurting Each Other
03. A Horse With No Name
04. I Need You
05. Living in a House Divided
06. Precious and Few
07. Without You
08. A Cowboy's Work Is Never Done
09. The First Time (Ever I Saw Your Face)
10. Theme from "Shaft"
11. The Way of Love
12. Alone Again (Naturally)
13. Song Sung Blue
14. Where Is the Love
15. Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A.
16. The Candy Man
17. Because
18. Daddy Don't You Walk So Fast
19. Day by Day [From Godspell]
20. Run to Me
21. Too Young
22. Brandy (You're a Fine Girl)

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Le Qanoun Enchanté (Solos De Cithare)

Posted By MiOd On 3:46 AM 0 comments
Le Qanoun Enchanté (Solos De Cithare)
Hassan El Gharbi & Mohamed El Akkad
Hassan Elgharbi, Hasan al-garbī o حسن الغربي (el occidental, por su origen tunecino) es uno de los más célebres qānūnīīn del siglo XX (murió en los '90). Fue cocinero antes de sastre, es decir, luthier antes que qānūnī. Para los aficionados, si se quiere situarlo mejor, podemos decir que fue uno de los maestros del afamado Julien Jalal ed-Din Weiss, qānūnī y director de al-Kindī. El disco se completa con grabaciones de principios de siglo (XX) a cargo de Mohammed Elakkad.

HASSAN ELGHARBI
1 - Chiraz
2 - Bayati
3 - Hidjaz
4 - Improvisiations
5 - Taqassims

Mohamed ELAKKAD
6 - Taqsim Higaz Kar ala Elwahda
7 - Bachraf Suzdellara

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Jazz Moods - Latin Romance

Posted By MiOd On 3:26 PM 0 comments
Jazz Moods: Latin Romance provides plenty of sensual atmosphere with performances by Latin jazz masters like Poncho Sanchez and Pete Escovedo. Tito Puente's "A Prelude to a Kiss," Mongo Santamaria's "Oasis" and "This Is Always" by Cal Tjader are just a few of the other smoldering tracks on this collection.

(01) [Poncho Sanchez] A Time for Love
(02) [Cal Tjader] This Couldn't Be the Real Thing
(03) [Tito Puente] Prelide To a Kiss
(04) [Pete Escovedo] Como Rien
(05) [Poncho Sanchez] Si No Hay Amore
(06) [Mongo Santamaria] Oasis
(07) [Carmen McRae & Cal Tjader] All in Love Is Fair
(08) [Tito Puente] Creme de Menthe
(09) [Poncho Sanchez] Siempre Te Amare
(10) [Cal Tjader] This Is Always
(11) [Poncho Sanchez] Anque Tu

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Treasure Edition: Traditional Ensemble

Posted By MiOd On 3:23 PM 0 comments
Treasure Edition: Series on Famous Chinese Musicians And Best-Known Music In The Twentieth Century

(01). Dance of the Yao People
(02). The Moon High Above
(03). Joyful South Yangtze
(04). Playing Along the Street (Xing-jie)
(05). Purple Bamboo Tune
(06). Marching on the Bright Road
(07). Jubilance
(08). Moderato Decorated Six Beat (Zhong-hua-liu-ban)
(09). Dance of the Golden Snake
(10). Rising Higher Step by Step
(11). The Full Moon and Blooming Flowers

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Ustad Ali Akbar Khan - An All India Radio Archival Release "Sarod" "4"

Posted By MiOd On 7:50 AM 0 comments
Indian musician Ali Akbar Khan (born 1922) is venerated in his homeland as a National Living Treasure, while internationally he is regarded as the greatest living classical Indian musician. A master of the sarod, a 25-stringed Indian instrument, Khan helped introduce and popularize Indian music throughout the Western world.

Khan was born on April 14, 1922, in Shivpur, East Bengal, an area now known as Bangladesh but then part of British-controlled India. He began learning and playing music when he was three years old. He was taught by his father, the late Padma Vibhusan Acharya Dr. Allauddin Khan, who is regarded as the most important figure in North Indian music of his time. The elder Khan played over 200 instruments and lived to be 110 years old. Regarded as both a great musician and teacher, Allauddin Khan attracted a great many aspiring Indian musicians who wanted to learn from the master.

Khan's family followed the rich tradition of North Indian classical music that had developed over 4,000 years and was based on ancient principles of rag (melody) and taal (rhythm). The family dates its ancestry back to Mian Tansen, a 16th-century court musician to the Mogul Emperor Akbar.

Allauddin Khan, who also mastered Western and African instruments during his career, continued teaching his son right up until his death in 1972. He also taught his daughters, Sharija, Jehanara, and Annapurna, and instructed many other famous musicians, among them the illustrious sitarist Ravi Shankar, flautist Pannalal Ghosh, and Ali Akbar Khan's own son sarodist, Aashish Khan.

Ali Khan's musical training was rigorous. For more than 20 years, starting at age three, he practiced every day for 18 hours a day. In an interview with V. R. Rao posted on the Cyberabad Web site, Khan explained that he learned music like a child learns language. "I didn't consciously want to learn music. It was more like a language that an infant learns," he said.

Khan's early musical education included a variety of string and percussion instruments including the sarod, sitar, sursingar, pakhavaj, rabab, and violin. In addition to the instruction from his father, Khan also learned vocals from his sister Jehanara and percussion from his uncle, Fakir Aftabuddin. Eventually, his father recommended that he focus on the sarod, an ancient steel-clad member of the lute family at least 2,000 years old with 25 strings and played with a bow. The sarod, Khan's father said, could fulfill 200 instruments in one.

Success Came Early
Khan made his first public performance, in Allahabad in 1935, when he was only 13 years old. At the same time, he began composing his own music under his father's direction. His skill was such that, when he was still a teenager, Khan was scheduled to accompany his father on a tour of Europe and America. However, the plans were canceled because Khan did not like the idea of being away from his mother, and he was not practicing his music as much as his father felt he should. The elder Khan cut his tour short and returned to India, to make sure his son practiced 15 to 18 hours a day.

In 1938 Ravi Shankar began studying with Allauddin Khan in Maihar and, in 1941 he married his teacher's daughter, Ali Khan's sister Annapurna, who was then considered to be the premiere player of the surbahar, a deeper-toned, heavier relative of the sitar, which was Shankar's chosen instrument. Ali Khan studied along with his now-brother-in-law Shankar and, thanks to the guidance of Alluddin Khan, the two musicians became highly regarded in Hindustani music circles for their duets.

In 1943, when he was 21, Khan was appointed court musician to the maharaja of Jodhpur. Khan held this position until the maharaja died several years later. The state of Jodhpur bestowed on the young musician the title of "Ustad," or master musician. At first, Khan's father was amused that his son would receive such a high honor at such an early age. However, later in life, Allauddin Khan told his son that he had been extremely proud of him. Then, to show his pleasure and respect, he gave his son the title of "Swara Samrat" or "emperor of melody." Of all the honors that he received in his life, Ali Khan would value that one the most.

During the 1940s Khan also made his first sound recordings, and he began his own career as a teacher, instructing Maharajah Hanumantha Singh. New opportunities opened up when he met world famous violin virtuoso Yehudi Menuhin at a recital in Delhi in 1952. Menuhin, who would call Khan one of the greatest musician in the world, was so impressed that he encouraged the young man to perform in the West. This resulted in Khan's first trip to the United States in 1955, when he appeared in a first-of-its kind concert at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. In addition, he appeared on Alistair Cooke's Omnibus television show, marking the first time Indian music was performed live on television. Khan's appearance had an enormous impact. It opened the door to Western acceptance of Indian music, an acceptance that reached full bloom in the 1960s, due, in large part, to the embracement of Indian music by the so-called "counterculture." However, at that time, Indian music and culture seemed alien to many Americans. "When I came in '55, because I was in Indian dress, people on the street in New York came out of the bars and shops and followed us," Khan remembered in an interview with Neela Banerjee for Asian Week. "They asked me, 'Who are you? Where are you from?' When I said 'India,' some of them didn't even know where it was. Or others who knew I was a musician asked funny questions like, 'How can you play music in India with all the tigers and snakes and monkeys you have to fight off?'"

In 1955 Khan also released his first Western recordings of Indian classical music, titled Music of India and Morning and Evening Ragas. The following year he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Calcutta, India. During the same decade Khan first began composing music for films, an activity he engaged in throughout his career. He composed his first score in 1953 for Aandhiyan, a film by Indian filmmaker Chetan Anand. Later, he would compose music for Devi (1960), by internationally acclaimed Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray; The Householder, (1963), the first film directed by the celebrated team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory; and Little Buddha, directed by Bernardo Bertolucci.

Opened Music School
Throughout the 1960s, Khan continued recording music and releasing recordings. In 1963 and 1966 he received the President of India Award. In addition, acting upon the influence of his father, who had taught him the value of teaching music, he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Berkeley, California, in 1967, and moved the school to a new location in Marin County two years later. For a long time, he had attempted to set up a school in his homeland, with little success. "For thirty years I struggled to establish a teaching institution in Calcutta," he told Rao. "But it wasn't possible. No response."

By the mid-1960s the West was receptive to listening to and learning about Indian music. A large part of the general public had became aware of Indian music due to the interest in the form by popular rock musicians, such as George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds, both of whom integrated Indian instrumentation into their own compositions. The essence of Indian music fit well with the times, and many in the youth movement were willing and ready to explore ideas that were either ancient, revolutionary, exotic, or esoteric.

Complex in form, Indian music is also spiritual and contemplative. Although a performer, Khan sees himself more as a listener and as an extension of his sarod, and he can lose his sense of self while performing. Indian music, he explained to Rao, "is like a meditation, like going to temple. Music makes your heart very, very, very clear. You can feel what is peace, what is friendship, what is love, what you can do for others. Even when you hear, it is like fresh air, clean water - even if you don't understand it, when you hear it, it is pure."

The West Embraced Indian Music
By the mid-to late 1960s classical Indian musicians such as Khan and Shankar were appearing at U.S. and U.K. music festivals, including the ground-breaking Monterey Pop Festival in San Francisco in 1967 and the first Woodstock music festival held in Bethel, New York, in 1969. In fact, Indian music became a staple at such events, while also gaining its largest mass-audience exposure with The Concert for Bangladesh, a documentary film of a musical benefit organized by Harrison to raise funds for the starving people of that country. The performing lineup included some of the most famous rock stars of the era including Harrison, Ringo Starr, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and Leon Russell as well as Shankar, who was accompanied for the event by Khan, Alla Rakah, and Kamala Chakravarty. (For his own concerts, Khan was most often accompanied by Pandit Swapan Chaudhuri on the tabla and son Alam on the sarode.)

During this period, Khan's fame on the international circuit was second only to that of Shankar due to Shankar's longer association with the Beatles. While Shankar had by now divorced Khan's sister, Annapurna, Shankar remained a disciple of Allauddin Khan. Shankar and Khan performed together for the final time at Montpellier, France, in July of 1985. Despite many pleas and generous offers, they never performed together again.

Honors and Awards Accumulated
In 1971 Khan received a Gold Disc award for his appearance on the bestselling Concert for Bangladesh album. The previous year, he earned a Grammy nomination for the recording Shree Rag. In 1973 and 1974 he received doctor of literature degrees from the Rabindra Bharati University in Calcutta, India, and the University of Dacca in Bangladesh, respectively.

In 1979 Khan started his own recording label, Alam Medina Music Productions label, named after his son. Throughout the next decade his recorded output was prolific. He released six albums in 1980, three in 1981, and four in 1982. In 1983, the year he released two more albums, he was again nominated for a Grammy award, this time for Misra Piloo. The following year he released four more albums and received a doctor of letters degree from the University of Delhi, India. From 1985 to 1986 Khan released nine more albums.

In addition to recording, Khan invested time in teaching. In 1985 he opened a new branch of his music school in Switzerland. In 1988, the year he produced his first music video, he received the Padma Vibhusan award, which is the highest honor presented to a civilian in India. He continued amassing honors and awards throughout the 1990s, in 1991 alone receiving the Kalidas Sanman award from the Madya Pradesh Academy of Music and Fine Arts as well as an honorary doctorate degree in arts from the California Institute of the Arts. He also became the first Indian musician to receive a MacArthur Foundation fellowship. The following year, he received the Mahatma Gandhi Cultural Award in London. In 1993 he was honored with the titles of Hathi Saropao and Dowari Tajeem during the Jodhpur Palace's Golden Jubilee Celebration, and also received the Bill Graham Lifetime Achievement Award from the Bay Area Music Awards Foundation.

Established Akbar Foundation
In 1994 Khan founded the Ali Akbar Khan Foundation to fund the Baba Allauddin Khan Institute, a library and archive dedicated to the preservation of his own compositions as well as his father's. This large-scale archiving project involves more than 30,000 compositions, including more than 10,000 compositions from the 16th through the 20th centuries. Khan's wife, sons, and students have joined their efforts to convert collections of music from old reel-to-reel tapes to digital master tapes.

In 1997, the year Khan celebrated his 75th birthday, he received the prestigious National Heritage fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. The presentation was made at the White House by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. That same year Khan became the second recipient, after filmmaker Satyajit Ray, to receive the Asian Paints Shiromani-Hall of Fame Award. In August of 1997, to celebrate the 50th year of India's independence, Khan performed at the United Nations in New York and at Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., at the request of the Indian Embassy.

Khan received yet another doctorate degree in 1998, this one from the Viswa Bharati University in Shantiniketan, India. He also received the Indira Gandhi Gold Plaque from the Asiatic Society of Calcutta. That same year, Willie L. Brown Jr., mayor of San Francisco, proclaimed October 18th "Ustad Ali Akbar Khan Day." In 1999 Khan was appointed adjunct professor to the Department of Music at the University of California at Santa Cruz. In this position he gave concerts and conducted classes and workshops. He also advised the Arts Division in developing courses and resources in classical music of India.

In 2002, to celebrate his life and times, Khan performed an 80th birthday concert at the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco. He was accompanied by his 20-year old son Alam and tabla player Swapan Chaudhuri. Also that year, he received an honorary degree in musical arts from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Like his father before him, Khan has continued teaching and performing, although he gradually has cut down on his public performances. Also like his father, much of Khan's time is devoted to teaching his son, Alam.

1. Raag Puriya Kalyan
2. Raag Manjh Khamaj

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Katherine Jenkins - Rejoice

Posted By MiOd On 9:16 PM 0 comments

Track List
01.Rejoice
02.I (Who Have Nothing)
03.Sancta Maria
04.Secret Love
05.Le Cose Che Sei Per Me
06.How Do You Leave the One You Love
07.Requiem For a Soldier
08.Somewhere.
09.Shout in Silence
10.Be Still My Soul
11.Kiss From a Rose
12.I Will Pray For You
13.Viva Tonight

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Katherine Jenkins - From The Heart

Posted By MiOd On 9:08 PM 0 comments
Track List
01.Nella Fantasia
02.Quello Che Faró Sara Per Te (Everything I Do, I Do It for You)
03.Time To Say Goodbye (Con Te Partiro)
04.The Flower Duet (Featuring Dame Kiri Te Kanawa)
05.Caruso
06.Nessun Dorma
07.L'Amore Sei Tu (I Will Always Love You)
08.Vide Cor Meum
09.The Prayer
10.Il Canto
11.Chanson Boheme
12.Hymn To The Fallen
13.Canto Della Terra
14.Cinema Paradiso

HERE

Katherine Jenkins - Second Nature

Posted By MiOd On 9:07 PM 0 comments
A voice that monopolizes the air when it is at full strength but can also break your heart at whispering volume might be an ideal way to describe what it’s like when Katherine Jenkins sings. “The young woman from the little place with the huge voice” is how some describe her. And lest we forget that she’s drop dead gorgeous with a body to match. With recordings that are multi-platinum along with critical acclaim and awards to last for decades, her every step is now chronicled daily in the English papers. Now Ms. Jenkins has set her sights squarely on America…Get ready. Not one to limit herself to opera or her classical/crossover “I love all different kinds of music and never intend to lock myself into just one category,” says Jenkins. Katherine’s US debut album “Believe” has been produced by 15 time Grammy winning star maker and hit man David Foster for 143/Warner Bros. Records and is scheduled to be released in June 2010. “All I know is that I’ve made the album that I am proudest of in my life. It is mine,” reveals Katherine. There was an express intention of crafting something new. “My usual way of working on my previous six albums was to pick the tracks, have the arrangements done for me and then go into the studio and sing…But collaborating with David Foster, Jenkins had some bold ideas starting with selecting Evanescence’s 2003 worldwide goth-pop smash “Bring Me to Life”. She had connected to the urgency of the original version. With David’s radical orchestral rewiring of the song – out with percussion and in with pulsating beat of strings, this touchstone song was the start of the album taking shape. When Bob Marley’s “No Woman, No Cry” was presented to her as a possible cut for the album, she thought it was an inspired idea. She began to imagine her own unique take on the classic in her head. “When you are taking classical crossover music to the next step, it’s all about how it is going to translate to the bigger setting. I immediately could imagine performing this song live. And one of the extraordinary things about Foster is his ability to understand the point in a song when the music would make the audience stand up and applaud. Our collective goal was to create that moment in the studio setting,” commented Katherine. “My favorite song on the record is ‘Believe’ which I had the honor to sing with Andrea Bocelli. Though we’ve sung together before, we’ve never recorded together. Instead of a traditional opera duet, we went for a new reading of a pop song. It’s not about turning my voice into a pop singer’s voice. It’s just my vocal and emotional interpretation of a pop song,” added Jenkins. Katherine’s special reading of Sarah McLachlan’s “Angel” was pared down by Foster on the production end. “I wanted it to feel like a song that I was singing around the house – very intimate and personal.” At 29 years of age, Katherine, a native from the tiny village of Neath in the Welsh Valley in humble surroundings, is taking it up to diva level and is ready to expand her horizons on a global scale. “Everyone has their own definition of a diva. When I think of a diva, I think of a voice. I think of a woman who’s independent and in charge of her own career. I think of a woman who knows what she wants to do artistically. I think of a woman who does that thing effortlessly. I’m more than ready to go down that path,” claims Katherine. On the eve of the first day of recording in Los Angeles and in the spur of the moment Foster insisted Katherine come with him to serenade Barbra Streisand at her birthday party. “There I was in my pajamas and jet lagged with no makeup on thinking, ‘how am I going to get ready for this in 15 minutes?’ Next thing I know I’m in a room filled with 200 of the biggest stars in Hollywood. I may have looked calm but I certainly wasn’t. I kept thinking that when I tell my mum about this back in Neath, she’s never going to believe me.’” Britain’s treasure Katherine Jenkins will not be a secret for much longer.
Track List
01. Time To Say Goodbye
02. Caruso
03. Va Pensiero
04. House Of No Regrets
05. O Sole Mio
06. En Aranjuez Con Tu Amor
07. Pres Des Remparts De Seville
08. Song To The Moon
09. Vide Cor Meum
10. Calon Ian
11. Hymn To The Fallen
12. Barcarolle
13. Laudate Dominum
14. O Holy Night
15. You'll Never Walk Alone

HERE

The Sonny Lester Orchestra - Exotica

Posted By MiOd On 5:02 AM 0 comments

Track List
01. Port Said
02. Dance of the Beggars
03. Oasis
04. Desert Love
05. Hejaz
06. Farewell to Port Said
07. ID
08. Ali Baba Cake Walk
09. Mocha Jazz
10. Malaguena
11. Granada
12. Frensei
13. The Breeze and I
14. Habanera
15. El Relicario
16. La Paloma
17. Valencia
18. Adios

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Caravelli - Romantic World

Posted By MiOd On 4:53 AM 0 comments

Track List
01 Breakin' Away
02 Keep Our Love Alive
03 Here We Are
04 Another Day In Paradise
05 Promise Me
06 The Girl Is Mine
07 Bamboleo
08 Wispers
09 Romantic World
10 Helene
11 I'm Your Baby Tonight
12 Los Olivos

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Treasure Edition: Piano Pieces by Bao Huiqiao

Posted By MiOd On 8:33 PM 0 comments
Treasure Edition: Series on Famous Chinese Musicians And Best-Known Music In The Twentieth Century

Piano: Bao Huiqiao
"Gathering Odds And Ends From Huaer" Suite

1. Flowing Waters
2. An Autumnal Moon Over a Placid Lake
3. Gathering Odds and Ends From Huaer Suite
4. Panvan (From D Major 2nd Piano Suite)
5. Onding (From Gaspard de la Nuit)
6. F Major Etude (Op.10 No.8)
7. Dobrogean Dance: Toccata
8. 3rd Movement From F# Minor 1st Piano Sonata (G. Enesco Opus 10)

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Ustad Ali Akbar Khan - An All India Radio Archival Release "Sarod" "3"

Posted By MiOd On 3:58 PM 0 comments
Indian musician Ali Akbar Khan (born 1922) is venerated in his homeland as a National Living Treasure, while internationally he is regarded as the greatest living classical Indian musician. A master of the sarod, a 25-stringed Indian instrument, Khan helped introduce and popularize Indian music throughout the Western world.

Khan was born on April 14, 1922, in Shivpur, East Bengal, an area now known as Bangladesh but then part of British-controlled India. He began learning and playing music when he was three years old. He was taught by his father, the late Padma Vibhusan Acharya Dr. Allauddin Khan, who is regarded as the most important figure in North Indian music of his time. The elder Khan played over 200 instruments and lived to be 110 years old. Regarded as both a great musician and teacher, Allauddin Khan attracted a great many aspiring Indian musicians who wanted to learn from the master.

Khan's family followed the rich tradition of North Indian classical music that had developed over 4,000 years and was based on ancient principles of rag (melody) and taal (rhythm). The family dates its ancestry back to Mian Tansen, a 16th-century court musician to the Mogul Emperor Akbar.

Allauddin Khan, who also mastered Western and African instruments during his career, continued teaching his son right up until his death in 1972. He also taught his daughters, Sharija, Jehanara, and Annapurna, and instructed many other famous musicians, among them the illustrious sitarist Ravi Shankar, flautist Pannalal Ghosh, and Ali Akbar Khan's own son sarodist, Aashish Khan.

Ali Khan's musical training was rigorous. For more than 20 years, starting at age three, he practiced every day for 18 hours a day. In an interview with V. R. Rao posted on the Cyberabad Web site, Khan explained that he learned music like a child learns language. "I didn't consciously want to learn music. It was more like a language that an infant learns," he said.

Khan's early musical education included a variety of string and percussion instruments including the sarod, sitar, sursingar, pakhavaj, rabab, and violin. In addition to the instruction from his father, Khan also learned vocals from his sister Jehanara and percussion from his uncle, Fakir Aftabuddin. Eventually, his father recommended that he focus on the sarod, an ancient steel-clad member of the lute family at least 2,000 years old with 25 strings and played with a bow. The sarod, Khan's father said, could fulfill 200 instruments in one.

Success Came Early
Khan made his first public performance, in Allahabad in 1935, when he was only 13 years old. At the same time, he began composing his own music under his father's direction. His skill was such that, when he was still a teenager, Khan was scheduled to accompany his father on a tour of Europe and America. However, the plans were canceled because Khan did not like the idea of being away from his mother, and he was not practicing his music as much as his father felt he should. The elder Khan cut his tour short and returned to India, to make sure his son practiced 15 to 18 hours a day.

In 1938 Ravi Shankar began studying with Allauddin Khan in Maihar and, in 1941 he married his teacher's daughter, Ali Khan's sister Annapurna, who was then considered to be the premiere player of the surbahar, a deeper-toned, heavier relative of the sitar, which was Shankar's chosen instrument. Ali Khan studied along with his now-brother-in-law Shankar and, thanks to the guidance of Alluddin Khan, the two musicians became highly regarded in Hindustani music circles for their duets.

In 1943, when he was 21, Khan was appointed court musician to the maharaja of Jodhpur. Khan held this position until the maharaja died several years later. The state of Jodhpur bestowed on the young musician the title of "Ustad," or master musician. At first, Khan's father was amused that his son would receive such a high honor at such an early age. However, later in life, Allauddin Khan told his son that he had been extremely proud of him. Then, to show his pleasure and respect, he gave his son the title of "Swara Samrat" or "emperor of melody." Of all the honors that he received in his life, Ali Khan would value that one the most.

During the 1940s Khan also made his first sound recordings, and he began his own career as a teacher, instructing Maharajah Hanumantha Singh. New opportunities opened up when he met world famous violin virtuoso Yehudi Menuhin at a recital in Delhi in 1952. Menuhin, who would call Khan one of the greatest musician in the world, was so impressed that he encouraged the young man to perform in the West. This resulted in Khan's first trip to the United States in 1955, when he appeared in a first-of-its kind concert at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. In addition, he appeared on Alistair Cooke's Omnibus television show, marking the first time Indian music was performed live on television. Khan's appearance had an enormous impact. It opened the door to Western acceptance of Indian music, an acceptance that reached full bloom in the 1960s, due, in large part, to the embracement of Indian music by the so-called "counterculture." However, at that time, Indian music and culture seemed alien to many Americans. "When I came in '55, because I was in Indian dress, people on the street in New York came out of the bars and shops and followed us," Khan remembered in an interview with Neela Banerjee for Asian Week. "They asked me, 'Who are you? Where are you from?' When I said 'India,' some of them didn't even know where it was. Or others who knew I was a musician asked funny questions like, 'How can you play music in India with all the tigers and snakes and monkeys you have to fight off?'"

In 1955 Khan also released his first Western recordings of Indian classical music, titled Music of India and Morning and Evening Ragas. The following year he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Calcutta, India. During the same decade Khan first began composing music for films, an activity he engaged in throughout his career. He composed his first score in 1953 for Aandhiyan, a film by Indian filmmaker Chetan Anand. Later, he would compose music for Devi (1960), by internationally acclaimed Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray; The Householder, (1963), the first film directed by the celebrated team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory; and Little Buddha, directed by Bernardo Bertolucci.

Opened Music School
Throughout the 1960s, Khan continued recording music and releasing recordings. In 1963 and 1966 he received the President of India Award. In addition, acting upon the influence of his father, who had taught him the value of teaching music, he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Berkeley, California, in 1967, and moved the school to a new location in Marin County two years later. For a long time, he had attempted to set up a school in his homeland, with little success. "For thirty years I struggled to establish a teaching institution in Calcutta," he told Rao. "But it wasn't possible. No response."

By the mid-1960s the West was receptive to listening to and learning about Indian music. A large part of the general public had became aware of Indian music due to the interest in the form by popular rock musicians, such as George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds, both of whom integrated Indian instrumentation into their own compositions. The essence of Indian music fit well with the times, and many in the youth movement were willing and ready to explore ideas that were either ancient, revolutionary, exotic, or esoteric.

Complex in form, Indian music is also spiritual and contemplative. Although a performer, Khan sees himself more as a listener and as an extension of his sarod, and he can lose his sense of self while performing. Indian music, he explained to Rao, "is like a meditation, like going to temple. Music makes your heart very, very, very clear. You can feel what is peace, what is friendship, what is love, what you can do for others. Even when you hear, it is like fresh air, clean water - even if you don't understand it, when you hear it, it is pure."

The West Embraced Indian Music
By the mid-to late 1960s classical Indian musicians such as Khan and Shankar were appearing at U.S. and U.K. music festivals, including the ground-breaking Monterey Pop Festival in San Francisco in 1967 and the first Woodstock music festival held in Bethel, New York, in 1969. In fact, Indian music became a staple at such events, while also gaining its largest mass-audience exposure with The Concert for Bangladesh, a documentary film of a musical benefit organized by Harrison to raise funds for the starving people of that country. The performing lineup included some of the most famous rock stars of the era including Harrison, Ringo Starr, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and Leon Russell as well as Shankar, who was accompanied for the event by Khan, Alla Rakah, and Kamala Chakravarty. (For his own concerts, Khan was most often accompanied by Pandit Swapan Chaudhuri on the tabla and son Alam on the sarode.)

During this period, Khan's fame on the international circuit was second only to that of Shankar due to Shankar's longer association with the Beatles. While Shankar had by now divorced Khan's sister, Annapurna, Shankar remained a disciple of Allauddin Khan. Shankar and Khan performed together for the final time at Montpellier, France, in July of 1985. Despite many pleas and generous offers, they never performed together again.

Honors and Awards Accumulated
In 1971 Khan received a Gold Disc award for his appearance on the bestselling Concert for Bangladesh album. The previous year, he earned a Grammy nomination for the recording Shree Rag. In 1973 and 1974 he received doctor of literature degrees from the Rabindra Bharati University in Calcutta, India, and the University of Dacca in Bangladesh, respectively.

In 1979 Khan started his own recording label, Alam Medina Music Productions label, named after his son. Throughout the next decade his recorded output was prolific. He released six albums in 1980, three in 1981, and four in 1982. In 1983, the year he released two more albums, he was again nominated for a Grammy award, this time for Misra Piloo. The following year he released four more albums and received a doctor of letters degree from the University of Delhi, India. From 1985 to 1986 Khan released nine more albums.

In addition to recording, Khan invested time in teaching. In 1985 he opened a new branch of his music school in Switzerland. In 1988, the year he produced his first music video, he received the Padma Vibhusan award, which is the highest honor presented to a civilian in India. He continued amassing honors and awards throughout the 1990s, in 1991 alone receiving the Kalidas Sanman award from the Madya Pradesh Academy of Music and Fine Arts as well as an honorary doctorate degree in arts from the California Institute of the Arts. He also became the first Indian musician to receive a MacArthur Foundation fellowship. The following year, he received the Mahatma Gandhi Cultural Award in London. In 1993 he was honored with the titles of Hathi Saropao and Dowari Tajeem during the Jodhpur Palace's Golden Jubilee Celebration, and also received the Bill Graham Lifetime Achievement Award from the Bay Area Music Awards Foundation.

Established Akbar Foundation
In 1994 Khan founded the Ali Akbar Khan Foundation to fund the Baba Allauddin Khan Institute, a library and archive dedicated to the preservation of his own compositions as well as his father's. This large-scale archiving project involves more than 30,000 compositions, including more than 10,000 compositions from the 16th through the 20th centuries. Khan's wife, sons, and students have joined their efforts to convert collections of music from old reel-to-reel tapes to digital master tapes.

In 1997, the year Khan celebrated his 75th birthday, he received the prestigious National Heritage fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. The presentation was made at the White House by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. That same year Khan became the second recipient, after filmmaker Satyajit Ray, to receive the Asian Paints Shiromani-Hall of Fame Award. In August of 1997, to celebrate the 50th year of India's independence, Khan performed at the United Nations in New York and at Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., at the request of the Indian Embassy.

Khan received yet another doctorate degree in 1998, this one from the Viswa Bharati University in Shantiniketan, India. He also received the Indira Gandhi Gold Plaque from the Asiatic Society of Calcutta. That same year, Willie L. Brown Jr., mayor of San Francisco, proclaimed October 18th "Ustad Ali Akbar Khan Day." In 1999 Khan was appointed adjunct professor to the Department of Music at the University of California at Santa Cruz. In this position he gave concerts and conducted classes and workshops. He also advised the Arts Division in developing courses and resources in classical music of India.

In 2002, to celebrate his life and times, Khan performed an 80th birthday concert at the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco. He was accompanied by his 20-year old son Alam and tabla player Swapan Chaudhuri. Also that year, he received an honorary degree in musical arts from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Like his father before him, Khan has continued teaching and performing, although he gradually has cut down on his public performances. Also like his father, much of Khan's time is devoted to teaching his son, Alam.

1. Raag Chandranandan
2. Raag Manjh Khamaj

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