L. Subramaniam En Concert - Festival de Lille

Posted By MiOd On 11:29 PM 0 comments
One of the undisputed masters of Carnatic violin work, L. Subramaniam recorded this album live at a hotel in 1983. The album was originally released by Harmonia Mundi in 1985 and re-released by Ocora in 1989. The raga used in the concert was primarily "Raga Kalyani," though others were used in the customary South Indian concert ending. As in all South Indian classical concerts, there are three major portions of the concert: the Ragam, in which the raga is freely explored without rhythmic accompaniment (similar to the Hindusthani alap); the Tanam, where a small amount of rhythm is added; and the Pallavi, which itself has four main parts but is primarily the main exposition of the raga. The four major features of the Pallavi consist of the neraval (ornamentation on and experimentation with the pallavi proper); the tri-kalam, where the tempo of the pallavi line is varied to three stages; swara-kalpana (an improvised section along with the drummer); and the raga-malika ending (literally, garland of ragas -- multiple ragas are each given a short exposition, here "Raga Satyapriya," "Raga Desh," and "Raga Ramapriya," and then the pallavi is returned to). Subramaniam plays with a fair amount of virtuosity here, as can be expected, with good runs of powerful Carnatic playing abounding throughout the album. Fans of the Carnatic music styles would most likely be thrilled at the playing, as might fans of the Hindusthani tradition. Those unaccustomed to Indian classical music, though, might be put off by the extensive length of works in the genre.

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Ustad Ali Akbar Khan - An All India Radio Archival Release "Sarod" "6"

Posted By MiOd On 8:47 PM 0 comments
Indian musician Ali Akbar Khan (born 1922) is venerated in his homeland as a National Living Treasure, while internationally he is regarded as the greatest living classical Indian musician. A master of the sarod, a 25-stringed Indian instrument, Khan helped introduce and popularize Indian music throughout the Western world.

Khan was born on April 14, 1922, in Shivpur, East Bengal, an area now known as Bangladesh but then part of British-controlled India. He began learning and playing music when he was three years old. He was taught by his father, the late Padma Vibhusan Acharya Dr. Allauddin Khan, who is regarded as the most important figure in North Indian music of his time. The elder Khan played over 200 instruments and lived to be 110 years old. Regarded as both a great musician and teacher, Allauddin Khan attracted a great many aspiring Indian musicians who wanted to learn from the master.

Khan's family followed the rich tradition of North Indian classical music that had developed over 4,000 years and was based on ancient principles of rag (melody) and taal (rhythm). The family dates its ancestry back to Mian Tansen, a 16th-century court musician to the Mogul Emperor Akbar.

Allauddin Khan, who also mastered Western and African instruments during his career, continued teaching his son right up until his death in 1972. He also taught his daughters, Sharija, Jehanara, and Annapurna, and instructed many other famous musicians, among them the illustrious sitarist Ravi Shankar, flautist Pannalal Ghosh, and Ali Akbar Khan's own son sarodist, Aashish Khan.

Ali Khan's musical training was rigorous. For more than 20 years, starting at age three, he practiced every day for 18 hours a day. In an interview with V. R. Rao posted on the Cyberabad Web site, Khan explained that he learned music like a child learns language. "I didn't consciously want to learn music. It was more like a language that an infant learns," he said.

Khan's early musical education included a variety of string and percussion instruments including the sarod, sitar, sursingar, pakhavaj, rabab, and violin. In addition to the instruction from his father, Khan also learned vocals from his sister Jehanara and percussion from his uncle, Fakir Aftabuddin. Eventually, his father recommended that he focus on the sarod, an ancient steel-clad member of the lute family at least 2,000 years old with 25 strings and played with a bow. The sarod, Khan's father said, could fulfill 200 instruments in one.

Success Came Early
Khan made his first public performance, in Allahabad in 1935, when he was only 13 years old. At the same time, he began composing his own music under his father's direction. His skill was such that, when he was still a teenager, Khan was scheduled to accompany his father on a tour of Europe and America. However, the plans were canceled because Khan did not like the idea of being away from his mother, and he was not practicing his music as much as his father felt he should. The elder Khan cut his tour short and returned to India, to make sure his son practiced 15 to 18 hours a day.

In 1938 Ravi Shankar began studying with Allauddin Khan in Maihar and, in 1941 he married his teacher's daughter, Ali Khan's sister Annapurna, who was then considered to be the premiere player of the surbahar, a deeper-toned, heavier relative of the sitar, which was Shankar's chosen instrument. Ali Khan studied along with his now-brother-in-law Shankar and, thanks to the guidance of Alluddin Khan, the two musicians became highly regarded in Hindustani music circles for their duets.

In 1943, when he was 21, Khan was appointed court musician to the maharaja of Jodhpur. Khan held this position until the maharaja died several years later. The state of Jodhpur bestowed on the young musician the title of "Ustad," or master musician. At first, Khan's father was amused that his son would receive such a high honor at such an early age. However, later in life, Allauddin Khan told his son that he had been extremely proud of him. Then, to show his pleasure and respect, he gave his son the title of "Swara Samrat" or "emperor of melody." Of all the honors that he received in his life, Ali Khan would value that one the most.

During the 1940s Khan also made his first sound recordings, and he began his own career as a teacher, instructing Maharajah Hanumantha Singh. New opportunities opened up when he met world famous violin virtuoso Yehudi Menuhin at a recital in Delhi in 1952. Menuhin, who would call Khan one of the greatest musician in the world, was so impressed that he encouraged the young man to perform in the West. This resulted in Khan's first trip to the United States in 1955, when he appeared in a first-of-its kind concert at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. In addition, he appeared on Alistair Cooke's Omnibus television show, marking the first time Indian music was performed live on television. Khan's appearance had an enormous impact. It opened the door to Western acceptance of Indian music, an acceptance that reached full bloom in the 1960s, due, in large part, to the embracement of Indian music by the so-called "counterculture." However, at that time, Indian music and culture seemed alien to many Americans. "When I came in '55, because I was in Indian dress, people on the street in New York came out of the bars and shops and followed us," Khan remembered in an interview with Neela Banerjee for Asian Week. "They asked me, 'Who are you? Where are you from?' When I said 'India,' some of them didn't even know where it was. Or others who knew I was a musician asked funny questions like, 'How can you play music in India with all the tigers and snakes and monkeys you have to fight off?'"

In 1955 Khan also released his first Western recordings of Indian classical music, titled Music of India and Morning and Evening Ragas. The following year he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Calcutta, India. During the same decade Khan first began composing music for films, an activity he engaged in throughout his career. He composed his first score in 1953 for Aandhiyan, a film by Indian filmmaker Chetan Anand. Later, he would compose music for Devi (1960), by internationally acclaimed Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray; The Householder, (1963), the first film directed by the celebrated team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory; and Little Buddha, directed by Bernardo Bertolucci.

Opened Music School
Throughout the 1960s, Khan continued recording music and releasing recordings. In 1963 and 1966 he received the President of India Award. In addition, acting upon the influence of his father, who had taught him the value of teaching music, he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Berkeley, California, in 1967, and moved the school to a new location in Marin County two years later. For a long time, he had attempted to set up a school in his homeland, with little success. "For thirty years I struggled to establish a teaching institution in Calcutta," he told Rao. "But it wasn't possible. No response."

By the mid-1960s the West was receptive to listening to and learning about Indian music. A large part of the general public had became aware of Indian music due to the interest in the form by popular rock musicians, such as George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds, both of whom integrated Indian instrumentation into their own compositions. The essence of Indian music fit well with the times, and many in the youth movement were willing and ready to explore ideas that were either ancient, revolutionary, exotic, or esoteric.

Complex in form, Indian music is also spiritual and contemplative. Although a performer, Khan sees himself more as a listener and as an extension of his sarod, and he can lose his sense of self while performing. Indian music, he explained to Rao, "is like a meditation, like going to temple. Music makes your heart very, very, very clear. You can feel what is peace, what is friendship, what is love, what you can do for others. Even when you hear, it is like fresh air, clean water - even if you don't understand it, when you hear it, it is pure."

The West Embraced Indian Music
By the mid-to late 1960s classical Indian musicians such as Khan and Shankar were appearing at U.S. and U.K. music festivals, including the ground-breaking Monterey Pop Festival in San Francisco in 1967 and the first Woodstock music festival held in Bethel, New York, in 1969. In fact, Indian music became a staple at such events, while also gaining its largest mass-audience exposure with The Concert for Bangladesh, a documentary film of a musical benefit organized by Harrison to raise funds for the starving people of that country. The performing lineup included some of the most famous rock stars of the era including Harrison, Ringo Starr, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and Leon Russell as well as Shankar, who was accompanied for the event by Khan, Alla Rakah, and Kamala Chakravarty. (For his own concerts, Khan was most often accompanied by Pandit Swapan Chaudhuri on the tabla and son Alam on the sarode.)

During this period, Khan's fame on the international circuit was second only to that of Shankar due to Shankar's longer association with the Beatles. While Shankar had by now divorced Khan's sister, Annapurna, Shankar remained a disciple of Allauddin Khan. Shankar and Khan performed together for the final time at Montpellier, France, in July of 1985. Despite many pleas and generous offers, they never performed together again.

Honors and Awards Accumulated
In 1971 Khan received a Gold Disc award for his appearance on the bestselling Concert for Bangladesh album. The previous year, he earned a Grammy nomination for the recording Shree Rag. In 1973 and 1974 he received doctor of literature degrees from the Rabindra Bharati University in Calcutta, India, and the University of Dacca in Bangladesh, respectively.

In 1979 Khan started his own recording label, Alam Medina Music Productions label, named after his son. Throughout the next decade his recorded output was prolific. He released six albums in 1980, three in 1981, and four in 1982. In 1983, the year he released two more albums, he was again nominated for a Grammy award, this time for Misra Piloo. The following year he released four more albums and received a doctor of letters degree from the University of Delhi, India. From 1985 to 1986 Khan released nine more albums.

In addition to recording, Khan invested time in teaching. In 1985 he opened a new branch of his music school in Switzerland. In 1988, the year he produced his first music video, he received the Padma Vibhusan award, which is the highest honor presented to a civilian in India. He continued amassing honors and awards throughout the 1990s, in 1991 alone receiving the Kalidas Sanman award from the Madya Pradesh Academy of Music and Fine Arts as well as an honorary doctorate degree in arts from the California Institute of the Arts. He also became the first Indian musician to receive a MacArthur Foundation fellowship. The following year, he received the Mahatma Gandhi Cultural Award in London. In 1993 he was honored with the titles of Hathi Saropao and Dowari Tajeem during the Jodhpur Palace's Golden Jubilee Celebration, and also received the Bill Graham Lifetime Achievement Award from the Bay Area Music Awards Foundation.

Established Akbar Foundation
In 1994 Khan founded the Ali Akbar Khan Foundation to fund the Baba Allauddin Khan Institute, a library and archive dedicated to the preservation of his own compositions as well as his father's. This large-scale archiving project involves more than 30,000 compositions, including more than 10,000 compositions from the 16th through the 20th centuries. Khan's wife, sons, and students have joined their efforts to convert collections of music from old reel-to-reel tapes to digital master tapes.

In 1997, the year Khan celebrated his 75th birthday, he received the prestigious National Heritage fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. The presentation was made at the White House by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. That same year Khan became the second recipient, after filmmaker Satyajit Ray, to receive the Asian Paints Shiromani-Hall of Fame Award. In August of 1997, to celebrate the 50th year of India's independence, Khan performed at the United Nations in New York and at Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., at the request of the Indian Embassy.

Khan received yet another doctorate degree in 1998, this one from the Viswa Bharati University in Shantiniketan, India. He also received the Indira Gandhi Gold Plaque from the Asiatic Society of Calcutta. That same year, Willie L. Brown Jr., mayor of San Francisco, proclaimed October 18th "Ustad Ali Akbar Khan Day." In 1999 Khan was appointed adjunct professor to the Department of Music at the University of California at Santa Cruz. In this position he gave concerts and conducted classes and workshops. He also advised the Arts Division in developing courses and resources in classical music of India.

In 2002, to celebrate his life and times, Khan performed an 80th birthday concert at the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco. He was accompanied by his 20-year old son Alam and tabla player Swapan Chaudhuri. Also that year, he received an honorary degree in musical arts from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Like his father before him, Khan has continued teaching and performing, although he gradually has cut down on his public performances. Also like his father, much of Khan's time is devoted to teaching his son, Alam.

1. Raag Behag - Gat
2. Raag Hem Behag

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Nguyên Lê - Maghreb And Friends

Posted By MiOd On 5:54 PM 0 comments
Born in Paris to Vietnamese parents, Le grew up listening to Deep Purple, then diversified. This explains his howling, fret-capering electric guitar style, although subtle whammy-bar usage does go a long way towards approximating the traditional folk sounds of his forebears. It's not as if this album only has 70s jazz-rock and Vietnam trad. to deal with. Its cast of players is mostly drawn from North Africa, with traditional string and skin (gimbri, bendir, etc.) mingling with the post-bebop horns of Paolo Fresu and Wolfgang Puschnig. All this rampant mixing might sound like a recipe for fusion disaster, but Le manages to fold in all the disparate elements convincingly, forging a particular hybrid that the listener is unlikely to find remotely familiar. Occasionally, his guitar is overworked, but mostly Le makes all the strange meetings appear entirely natural. "FunkRai" features Cheb Mami on synth, its funky rhythm track constructed from loops and samples, while "Ifrikyia" also brings in the West African kora and Peul people's flute. Le's singers also make new friends, a Maghrebi contingent alternating verses with Vietnamese and Guinean soloists during "Louanges".

1. Ifrikyia
2. Constantine
3. Louanges
4. Yhadik Allah
5. Nora
6. Funk Rai
7. L'Arkha Li Jeya
8. Guinia
9. Nesraf

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Various - Aali Diwali Mangaldai

Posted By MiOd On 9:02 AM 0 comments
Track Listing
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(01). Bismillah Khan - Shahnai - Raag Todi
(02). Lata Mangeshkar, Panditrao Nagarkar - Ghanshyam Sundara
(03). Kumar Gandharva & Chorus - Uthi Uthi Gopala
(04). Manik Varma - Lavite Mee Niranjan
(05). Anuradha & Chorus - Diwali Yenar Angan Sajnar
(06). Lata Mangeshkar - Aali Diwali Mangaldayi
(07). Usha Mangeshkar & Chorus - Aali Diwali
(08). Asha Bhosle & Chorus - Naviin Aale Saal Aajla
(09). Lata Mangeshkar & Chorus - Aali Diwali Aali Diwali
(10). Anuradha Paudwal - Aali Majhya Ghari Diwali
(11). Lata Mangeshkar & Chorus - Shubam Karoti Kalyanam
(12). Shivangi Kolhapure - Ovalite Mee Bhauraya
(13). Lata Mangeshkar - Bhaubeejela Aala Majha Bhau Ghari
(14). Asha Bhosle - Soniyachya Tati
(15). Asha Bhosle - Divya Divyanchi Jyot
(16). Lata Mangeshkar & Chorus - Anandache Dohi Anand Tarang

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Embryo - Ibn Battuta

Posted By MiOd On 6:42 PM 0 comments
One of the most original and innovative Krautrock bands, Embryo fused traditional ethnic music with their own jazzy space rock style. Over their 30-year existence, during which Christian Burchard has been the only consistent member, the group has traveled the world, playing with hundreds of different musicians and releasing over 20 records.

Originally a jazzy space rock group, Embryo was formed in 1969 in Munich, Germany, by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, marimba), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone), Luther Meid (bass), Jimmy Jackson (organ), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion), Wolfgang Paap (drums), Ingo Schmidt (saxophone), and John Kelly (guitar). However, the lineup was already different by the time of the sessions for their debut album. The resulting record, Opal (1970), is considered the band's masterpiece of their early, more psychedelic sound. By the time of Embryo's Rache (1971), the group was already adding ethnic touches to their music.

In 1972, the same year they played at the Olympic Games in Munich, Embryo was invited by the Goethe Institute to tour Northern Africa and Portugal. In Morocco, the band was fascinated by the different tonal scales used by Moroccan musicians, profoundly shaping the group's music to come. In 1973, the band was joined by saxophonist Charlie Mariano and guitarist Roman Bunka, who were both influential in moving Embryo towards their genre-blending mixture of space rock with ethnic sounds. We Keep On, released in 1973, was the most successful album in the group's career. However, after Surfin' (1974) and Bad Heads and Bad Cats (1975), Burchard decided the band was moving in too commercial a direction and led them on an eight-month excursion to India, where they met local musicians. Shoba Gurtu, an Indian singer the band met during their travels, would later record an album with them, 1979's Apo Calypso. Embryo also set up their own record label, Schneeball, with the rock band Checkpoint Charlie during this time. The band then took off on a two-year journey through the Middle East, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, during which the band's bus broke down in Tehran in the middle of a civil war in 1981. The double album Embryo Reise (1981) captured this musical expedition as did the documentary film Vagabunden-Karawane. A

fter touring Asia, the Middle East, and Egypt during the early '80s, Embryo released their first studio album in seven years, Zack Gluck, in 1984. The band then toured Africa and became involved with Nigeria's Yoruba Dun Dun Ensemble. However, after internal conflicts, Embryo split up. Burchard then continued under the name of Embryo with new musicians while a new group, Embryos Dissidenten, was formed. The band released 2001 Live: Vol. 1. ~

01. Code 7
02. Ibn Battuta
03. Komet 41
04. 1/4 Tone Jazz, part 1
05. Man Bekhod Wa To Bekhod
06. Prelude
07. Beat From Bagdad
08. Simai Ka
09. 1/4 Tone Jazz, Part 2
10. Kletta
11. El Qalb Yeshak Kulli Gamil
12. Andalusian Beat
13. Zainab See All 2

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Ana Moura - Guarda-Me a Vida Na Mao - Keep My Life in Your Hand

Posted By MiOd On 9:18 AM 0 comments

Ana Moura (born 1979 in Santarém, Portugal) is an internationally recognized Portuguese fado singer, and the youngest fadista to be nominated for a Dutch Edison Award.

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Various - Magnificent Malkauns

Posted By MiOd On 7:35 PM 0 comments
'Raga Malkauns' a late night raga which is historically and usually sing in praise of Lord Shiva, but is also performed on other themes such as romantic, bravery etc. Raga Malkauns is not only one of the most ancient Indian Ragas, But it is one of the most powerful ragas and needless to say, the singer must possess great energy and accuracy to render this raga. In this particular compilation, all tracks included were sung in this raga by some great Indian Classical singers including Pandit D.V. Paluskar, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan & Pandit Jasraj. The most interesting part of this compilation is all tracks including here are very rarely available especially the rare duet of Pandit Bhimsen Joshi & Pandit Jasraj from Bribal, My Brother soundtrack and the powerful renditions of D.V. Paluskar, Bade Ghulam Ali Khan will leaves powerful impact on listener. Heartily and Highly Recommended.

1. Pandit D. V. Paluskar - Raga Malkauns - Nand Ke Chhaila Dhit (1951)
2. Pandit Bhimsen Joshi - Raga Malkauns Khayal In Vilambit Ektaal & Drut Teentaal (1962)
3. Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan - Raga Malkauns - Khayal In Vilambit Jhoomra & Drut Teentaal (1960)
4. Pandit Bhimsen Joshi & Pandit Jasraj - Raga Malkauns Jugalbandi (1973)

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Kotoja - Sawale

Posted By MiOd On 2:11 PM 0 comments
A multicultural collaboration between Nigerian and American musicians, Kotoja is led by award-winning bassist, vocalist, and composer Ken Okulolo. Based in the San Francisco Bay Aarea, the 14-piece group creates an uplifting sound rooted in West African highlife, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, soul music, and rhythm & blues. According to Tower Pulse, Kotoja is "a winning combination...an intoxicating brew...a wild hybrid of styles from highlife to juju to soca and reggae." In a review of Kotoja's 1992 album, Sawale, Downbeat wrote "the rhythm is solid and the music genuinely uplifting."

Okulolo formed Kotoja shortly after emigrating to the United States in 1985. A five-time winner of the Nigerian Journalists Association award as "top bassist," Okulolo had previously attracted attention with his bands Monomono and Positive Vibrations in the 1970s, and as a sideman in King Sunny Ade's band in the mid-'80s. A native of the Nigerian village of Aladja, Okulolo was initially inspired by the highlife bands he heard while studying in Anglican missionary schools in Warri. He spent countless hours listening on his shortwave radio to jazz, Afro-Cuban, R&B, and Congolese music. Apprenticing himself to an uncle, guitarist Miller Okulolo, he soon mastered the stringed instrument. Touring with the Harmony Searchers, Okulolo was overheard by a talent scout for bandleader Dr. Victor Olaiya. The talent scout was so impressed that he persuaded Okulolo to relocate to Lagos and join Olaiya's band as one of three bass players. Having secured his reputation with Olaiya's band, Okulolo joined with vocalist Joni Haastrup to form Monomono. Within a couple of years, Okulolo and Haastrup's enthusiastic performances had made Monomono one of Nigeria's most successful bands. In the early '80s, Okulolo recorded his first solo album, Talking Bass, and formed a new band, Positive Vibrations. In 1985, he toured the United States with King Sunny Ade. He became so enamored of the country that he decided to emigrate later the same year. In addition to working with Kotoja, Okulolo is the leader of the Nigerian Brothers and continues to record with Ade.

Kotoja is an Afrobeat/Afrofunk group out of the Bay Area, led by renowned Nigerian bassist/vocalist/songwriter Baba Ken Okulolo, who was first seen in the U.S. with King Sunny Ade's African Beats. He played with many great Nigerian musicians, including Fela Kuti, and was 5 times voted Nigeria's best bassist. Their lead guitarist is Soji Odukogbe, who was lead guitarist for Fela for 5 years. The music is funky, jazzy, very danceable, with a message of peace and love for the world.

01. Sawale
02. Ejiro Oghene
03. Money Wahala
04. Axe Da Fe
05. Evil Eye
06. Be My Friend
07. Vami Duwe (Let's Dance)
08. Water No Get Enemy
09. Iye Iye
10. We No Dey Run
11. Save The World For Our Children

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Nguyên Lê - 3 Trios

Posted By MiOd On 7:52 AM 0 comments
Nguyên Lê is a fusion guitarist who has versatility, leaves space, and does not mind caressing a melody now and then. On 3 Trios, he is heard with three different trios, all of which are impressive and engage in close interplay with the leader. Lê, who contributed nine of the 11 selections, is the lead voice throughout despite occasional solos from his sidemen. The music is adventurous and unpredictable, with even Thelonious Monk's "Straight No Chaser" being turned into creative fusion. 3 Trios is worth checking out by fans of rockish guitar solos.

01. Silk
02. Silver
03. Sand
04. Dance Of The Comet
05. Foow
06. Kinderhund
0 7. Woof
08. Idoma
09. La Parfum
10. Blue Monkey
11. Straight No Chaser

Nguyen Le (acoustic, electric & fretless guitars, e-bow, synthesizer); Marc Johnson, Dieter Ilg, Renaud Garcia-Fons (acoustic bass); Mino Cinelu (drums, percussion); Peter Erskine, Danny Gotlieb (drums).

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Shujaat Khan - Shams

Posted By MiOd On 8:13 PM 0 comments
Shujaat Husain Khan, Katayoun Goudarzi, Imamyar Hasanov, Abhiman Kaushal
With more than 50 musical releases and a Grammy nomination, Shujaat Husain Khan is perhaps the greatest North Indian classical musician of his generation. He belongs to the Imdad Khan gharana (tradition) of the sitar (lute) and is the seventh in the unbroken line from his family that has produced many musical masters. His style known as the gayaki ang, is imitative of the subtleties of the human voice. Shujaat Khans' openness to collaborating with artists of all genres of music has produced some enormously successful works. The Grammy nominated album Rain by the indo-Persian Ghazal Ensemble featuring Kayhan Kalhor is only one such example. Abhiman Kaushal is an outstanding tabla artist who is much sought after for his sensitive accompaniment and intense solo playing. Kaushal has numerous recordings including \"Ravi Shankar in Venice,\" \"Farewell My Friend\" (with Ravi Shankar), and \"Passages\" (with Ravi Shankar and Philip Glass). National Geographic has recorded his tabla for the soundtrack to their documentary "Man Eaters of North India." He has also recorded for various world music compilations, Zoolander the movie and has performed live for MTV\'s Aerosmith icon show. Born in Tehran, Iran Katayoun Goudarzi, a resident of New Jersey, started reading and writing poetry at age seven. In 2006 she published her first book, \"Eshgh o Vahdat \" an annotated selection of Rumi\'s ghazals and made her debut as a performer of classical Persian poetry in Rooz O Shab, Poetry of Rumi, followed by Hayran in 2008. Born in Baku, Azerbaijan Imamyar Hasanov a resident of Virginia started playing the kamancha at the age of seven and eventually became the youngest soloist in Azerbaijan\'s National Orchestra and National Dance Ensemble. He has a Master of Music Degree in Conducting from the Azerbaijan State Conservatory . During his conservatory studies, he worked with Professor Agha Jabrayil Abasaliyev and became interested in the art of mugham. Imamyar has performed in Canada, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Turkey and the US and has collaborated with artists such as Chingiz Sadykhovm, Aziz Herawi, Pejman Hadadi and Hossein Omoumi. On stage, Imamyar is a dynamic virtuoso who performs Azerbaijani and Middle Eastern traditional improvisations as well as European classics. 1. Satiated 2. Shams 3. Go Not Without Me 4. O My Soul 5. Opium 6. Whirling Flac(EAC Rip): 415 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 160 MB | Front Cover Archives have 5% of the information for restoration Flac Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 OR MP3 320 kbps HERE

Gema y Pavel - Cosa de Broma

Posted By MiOd On 11:18 PM 0 comments
This is a stunningly brilliant record from start to finish. The arrangements bring new life to already great material, and demonstrate creativity far beyond what is normally encountered. It is harmonically and conceptually adventurous, and draws as much from contemporary jazz artists like Keith Jarrett as it does the traditional Afro-cuban roots that it displays on the surface. I'm buying it for the second time because I happened to learn Jurame for a gig I was playing and was reminded once again of what an amazing version of it that they do here.

El segundo disco de Gema y Pavel rescata las raices musicales de esta pareja de jovenes cubanos; graban desde boleros hasta canciones con un fuerte tinte africano, sin olvidar la version de que hacen de Girl, de los Beatles. Muy Recomendable.

01. La caminadora
02. Júrame
03. Aixa
04. ¡Ay del amor!
05. Longina
06. Mayeya
07. Noche de ronda
08. El zun zun
09. Te amo
10. Girl
11. ¿Hacia dónde?
12. Oshé

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Africando - Baloba!

Posted By MiOd On 4:04 PM 0 comments
Baloba! digs deeper into theme of African-Latin unity. The grooves find ground that transcends ethnicities and geography. David Byrne has said that the "music of the African Diaspora has colonized the planet". Africando brings this point home in force. On this album, Africando taps the source of the Cuban sexteto tipico of the 1920's and 1930's. "Aicha" sung by Nicholas Menheim is a fine tuned salsa that is a dancer's delight. The changes are subtle and distinct. Dancers groove on change, subtle or sudden. The honey-habenero voice of Gnonnas Pedro keeps the flame hot with "Huenouhwo", utilizing tres guitar accompaniment. This chameleon group strikes at the heart of classic Cuban music of the 1950's and brings it to vital tropicality in the new millennium of 2000. Their mix of Senegalese Wolof-Spanish bridges the transatlantic gulf between mother Africa and the new world in a smooth danceable style that lives on and connects. Ronnie Baro's guaracha, "Guarachea mi Chula", is right in the pocket and puts out lots of heat. "Demal", sung by Nicholas Menheim, is a tasteful tres track, not only for the vocal but also for the guitar-trumpet-percussion interplay. "Aminata" features the Senegalese super-singer Laba Sosseh and it's a track that blisters with bright brass that harkens back to the Havana of the 1950's. Baloba! is a Yoruba exclamation that expresses something astonishing. Africando has produced another gem of an album. Highly recommended.

01. Am Saaxul
02. Ayo Nene
03. Te Voy A matar ... Con Amor
04. Aïcha
05. Huenouhwo
06. Dalaka
07. Katiana
08. Guarachea Mi Chula
09. Demal
10. Aminata
11. La Vie En Rose
12. Dacefo
13. Aïcha (Wolof version)

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L. Subramaniam - Raga

Posted By MiOd On 9:38 PM 0 comments
A gifted South Indian counterpart of Jean-Luc Ponty on the electric violin, and endlessly curious about all kinds of music, Subramaniam has been a pioneer in exploring intelligent fusions between European classical music, American jazz, rock, and South Indian music. His father, a master Indian violinist, and mother, who played the Indian vina, were his first musical influences, and after abandoning a career in medicine, he formed a violin trio with his two brothers while still in India. He toured America and Europe with Ravi Shankar and ex-Beatle George Harrison in 1974, made his first fusion album in Copenhagen (Garland), and wrote material for Stu Goldberg and Larry Coryell in 1978. He settled in the Los Angeles area in the late '70s in order to earn a doctorate in Western music at the California Institute of the Arts, where he also taught South Indian music. He led a group with Coryell, George Duke, and Tom Scott in the 1980s, and recorded several fascinating LPs for Milestone -- including an LP with Stephane Grappelli -- that fused classical music, electric and acoustic jazz, and South Indian music. Subramaniam has also written works for classical orchestras; his Violin Concerto juxtaposes naïve Hollywood-ish romantic music with South Indian instruments and structures. His debut for the Erato Detour label, Global Fusion, followed in 1999.

(01) Ragam
(02) Tanam
(03) Pallavi

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Kayhan Kalhor - Taa Bikaraan Doordast

Posted By MiOd On 6:34 PM 0 comments
This album is a proof that the language barrier still exists. In spite of my praiseworthy efforts to find more information I ended up with nothing much in terms of news. There's some information on the record covers, but reading what it says is beyond my linguistic abilities. Perhaps someone who can read Arabic can translate it for us.

01. Taa Bikaraan Doordast I
02. Taa Bikaraan Doordast II
03. Taa Bikaraan Doordast III
04. Taa Bikaraan Doordast IV
05. Taa Bikaraan Doordast V
06. Taa Bikaraan Doordast VI
07. Taa Bikaraan Doordast VII
08. Taa Bikaraan Doordast VIII
09. Taa Bikaraan Doordast IX
10. Taa Bikaraan Doordast X
11. Taa Bikaraan Doordast XI

Kayhan Kalhor - kamancheh
Otal Arzejan - baglama

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Beth Carvalho - Canta Cartola

Posted By MiOd On 8:54 AM 0 comments
Beth Carvalho was born in the working class suburb of Gamboa but was raised in the middle class South Side. At the age of seven, she was performing in novice shows in several Carioca radios, like the Nacional. At the same time, she studied musical theory at the Escola Nacional de Música. With the bossa nova movement gaining informal venues like universities and schools, she gave her initial musical steps into that style. Her first recording, for example, was the single "Por Quem Morrer De Amor" (Roberto Menescal/Ronaldo Bôscoli). She also performed another bossa nova with Tibério Gaspar, musician/composer at the time, and in the bossa group Conjunto 3-D (Antônio Adolfo, piano, Chico Batera, drums, Luís, bass), singing with Eduardo Conde. But at the same time, evidenced her infatuation for the typical samba of the hills by participating in the show A Hora E A Vez Do Samba with Zé Keti and Os Cinco Crioulos.

In 1968, her interpretation for "Andança" (Danilo Caymmi/Edmundo Souto/Paulinho Tapajós) received third place at the III Festival Internacional da Canção. The success achieved gave birth to the first LP, Andança, which included the song that became a classic of MPB, being re-recorded by many great singers like Maria Bethânia, Elis Regina, and Nana Caymmi. The big turning point came in 1971 when she recorded the samba-enredo "Rio Grande Do Sul Na Festa Do Preto Forro" for the samba school Unidos de São Carlos. From then on, she dedicated herself to performing sambas, tightening her bonds with the hill culture. The recording of "Só Quero Ver" (Edmundo Souto/Paulinho Tapajós) was a big hit and, excited by seeing it being sung in Salgueiro and Mangueira's rodas de samba, Carvalho decided that she would follow the in-your-face way of making music of the traditional communities of the hills. And it is as a samba singer that she moved for Tapecar company, where she recorded the single "Amor, Amor," followed by the LP Canto Por Um Novo Dia, with samba icons like Geraldo Vespar, Nelson Cavaquinho (playing his unique violão in "Folhas Secas"), Luizão, Marçal, Luna, Eliseu, Martinho da Vila, and the group Nosso Samba. In 1974, the LP Pra Seu Governo also had Nelson Cavaquinho playing and singing and had a hit with "1800 Colinas" (Gracia do Salgueiro). The album had an excellent performance in Brazil and was also released in France. It opened the doors for a season in a Parisian nightclub. Nos Botequins Da Vida (1977) sold 400,000 copies with the hits "Saco de Feijão" (Francisco Santana) and "Olho Por Olho" (Zé do Maranhão/Daniel Santos).

Since the late '70s, Carvalho, already established as a sambista, supported several young composers who later became famous in the samba and pagode idioms as the carriers of the torch, like Luiz Carlos da Vila, Jorge Aragão, Zeca Pagodinho, Almir Guineto, the group Fundo de Quintal, Arlindo Cruz, and Sombrinha, Moacyr Luz, and the Quinteto em Branco e Preto. On her next LP, 1978's De Pé No Chão, she presented Jorge Aragão (who participated in the recording playing the violão) interpreting his "Vou Festejar," which became a hit. The Cacique de Ramos participated in the percussion for the first time, opening an association that continues to last. Beth Carvalho No Pagode (1979), considered a masterpiece, had her biggest hit of all time, "Coisinha Do Pai" (Jorge Aragão/Almir Guineto/Luiz Carlos). In the late '90s, the song was inserted in the space probe Pathfinder. The album had several other hits, like "Pedi Ao Céu" (Almir Guineto/Luverci Ernesto) and "Tem Nada Não" (Almir Guineto/Luverci Ernesto/Jorge Aragão). Beth Carvalho was paid homage by the samba school Unidos do Cabuçu, which dedicated the samba-enredo "Beth Carvalho, a Enamorada Do Samba" (1984) to her.

As a composer, she wrote with "Canção de Esperar Neném," included in Sentimento Brasileiro (1980). In 1987, she recorded the LP Beth Carvalho Ao Vivo No Festival De Montreux live in the Montreux Festival (Switzerland). In the early '90s she would record another live album abroad, this time at the Olympia (Paris, France), Ao Vivo No Olympia. In 1999, Carvalho had another big national hit in the radio with "Samba De Arerê" (Xande de Pilares/Arlindo Cruz/Mauro Jr.), from the live CD Pagode De Mesa.

01. As Rosas Nao Falam
02. Que Sejam Bem- Vindos
03. Consideracao
04. Camarim
05. Cordas De Aco
06. Amargo Presente
07. Espero Por Ti
08. Corra E Olhe O Ceu
09. O Sol Nascera
10. Acontece
11. Motivacao
12. O Mundo E Um Moinho

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Altin Sarkilar, Vol. 4: Türk Müziginde Unutulmayan

Posted By MiOd On 9:52 PM 0 comments
Golden Songs, Vol. 4:
The Unforgettable Turkish Music
Track Listing
-------------
(01). Enginde Yavas Yavas - Enginde Yavas Yavas
(02). Dilsad Olacak Diye - Dilsad Olacak Diye
(03). Ne Gunah Etse Acilmaz - Ne Gunah Etse Acilmaz
(04). Senede Bir Gun - Senede Bir Gun
(05). Yesil Gozlerinden Muhabbet Kaptim - Yesil Gozlerinden Muhabbet Kaptim
(06). Elveda Meyhaneci - Elveda Meyhaneci
(07). Yildizli Semalar - Yildizli Semalar
(08). Agora Meyhanesi - Agora Meyhanesi
(09). Bu Aksam Butun Meyhanelerini Dolastim Istanbul'un - Bu Aksam Butun Meyhanelerini Dolastim Istanbul'un
(10). Seni Ben Ellerin Olsun Diye Mi Sevdim - Seni Ben Ellerin Olsun Diye Mi Sevdim
(11). Elbet Bir Gun Bulusacagiz - Elbet Bir Gun Bulusacagiz
(12). Kadehinde Zehir Olsa - Kadehinde Zehir Olsa

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Ustad Ali Akbar Khan - An All India Radio Archival Release "Sarod" "5"

Posted By MiOd On 6:56 PM 0 comments
Indian musician Ali Akbar Khan (born 1922) is venerated in his homeland as a National Living Treasure, while internationally he is regarded as the greatest living classical Indian musician. A master of the sarod, a 25-stringed Indian instrument, Khan helped introduce and popularize Indian music throughout the Western world.

Khan was born on April 14, 1922, in Shivpur, East Bengal, an area now known as Bangladesh but then part of British-controlled India. He began learning and playing music when he was three years old. He was taught by his father, the late Padma Vibhusan Acharya Dr. Allauddin Khan, who is regarded as the most important figure in North Indian music of his time. The elder Khan played over 200 instruments and lived to be 110 years old. Regarded as both a great musician and teacher, Allauddin Khan attracted a great many aspiring Indian musicians who wanted to learn from the master.

Khan's family followed the rich tradition of North Indian classical music that had developed over 4,000 years and was based on ancient principles of rag (melody) and taal (rhythm). The family dates its ancestry back to Mian Tansen, a 16th-century court musician to the Mogul Emperor Akbar.

Allauddin Khan, who also mastered Western and African instruments during his career, continued teaching his son right up until his death in 1972. He also taught his daughters, Sharija, Jehanara, and Annapurna, and instructed many other famous musicians, among them the illustrious sitarist Ravi Shankar, flautist Pannalal Ghosh, and Ali Akbar Khan's own son sarodist, Aashish Khan.

Ali Khan's musical training was rigorous. For more than 20 years, starting at age three, he practiced every day for 18 hours a day. In an interview with V. R. Rao posted on the Cyberabad Web site, Khan explained that he learned music like a child learns language. "I didn't consciously want to learn music. It was more like a language that an infant learns," he said.

Khan's early musical education included a variety of string and percussion instruments including the sarod, sitar, sursingar, pakhavaj, rabab, and violin. In addition to the instruction from his father, Khan also learned vocals from his sister Jehanara and percussion from his uncle, Fakir Aftabuddin. Eventually, his father recommended that he focus on the sarod, an ancient steel-clad member of the lute family at least 2,000 years old with 25 strings and played with a bow. The sarod, Khan's father said, could fulfill 200 instruments in one.

Success Came Early
Khan made his first public performance, in Allahabad in 1935, when he was only 13 years old. At the same time, he began composing his own music under his father's direction. His skill was such that, when he was still a teenager, Khan was scheduled to accompany his father on a tour of Europe and America. However, the plans were canceled because Khan did not like the idea of being away from his mother, and he was not practicing his music as much as his father felt he should. The elder Khan cut his tour short and returned to India, to make sure his son practiced 15 to 18 hours a day.

In 1938 Ravi Shankar began studying with Allauddin Khan in Maihar and, in 1941 he married his teacher's daughter, Ali Khan's sister Annapurna, who was then considered to be the premiere player of the surbahar, a deeper-toned, heavier relative of the sitar, which was Shankar's chosen instrument. Ali Khan studied along with his now-brother-in-law Shankar and, thanks to the guidance of Alluddin Khan, the two musicians became highly regarded in Hindustani music circles for their duets.

In 1943, when he was 21, Khan was appointed court musician to the maharaja of Jodhpur. Khan held this position until the maharaja died several years later. The state of Jodhpur bestowed on the young musician the title of "Ustad," or master musician. At first, Khan's father was amused that his son would receive such a high honor at such an early age. However, later in life, Allauddin Khan told his son that he had been extremely proud of him. Then, to show his pleasure and respect, he gave his son the title of "Swara Samrat" or "emperor of melody." Of all the honors that he received in his life, Ali Khan would value that one the most.

During the 1940s Khan also made his first sound recordings, and he began his own career as a teacher, instructing Maharajah Hanumantha Singh. New opportunities opened up when he met world famous violin virtuoso Yehudi Menuhin at a recital in Delhi in 1952. Menuhin, who would call Khan one of the greatest musician in the world, was so impressed that he encouraged the young man to perform in the West. This resulted in Khan's first trip to the United States in 1955, when he appeared in a first-of-its kind concert at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. In addition, he appeared on Alistair Cooke's Omnibus television show, marking the first time Indian music was performed live on television. Khan's appearance had an enormous impact. It opened the door to Western acceptance of Indian music, an acceptance that reached full bloom in the 1960s, due, in large part, to the embracement of Indian music by the so-called "counterculture." However, at that time, Indian music and culture seemed alien to many Americans. "When I came in '55, because I was in Indian dress, people on the street in New York came out of the bars and shops and followed us," Khan remembered in an interview with Neela Banerjee for Asian Week. "They asked me, 'Who are you? Where are you from?' When I said 'India,' some of them didn't even know where it was. Or others who knew I was a musician asked funny questions like, 'How can you play music in India with all the tigers and snakes and monkeys you have to fight off?'"

In 1955 Khan also released his first Western recordings of Indian classical music, titled Music of India and Morning and Evening Ragas. The following year he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Calcutta, India. During the same decade Khan first began composing music for films, an activity he engaged in throughout his career. He composed his first score in 1953 for Aandhiyan, a film by Indian filmmaker Chetan Anand. Later, he would compose music for Devi (1960), by internationally acclaimed Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray; The Householder, (1963), the first film directed by the celebrated team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory; and Little Buddha, directed by Bernardo Bertolucci.

Opened Music School
Throughout the 1960s, Khan continued recording music and releasing recordings. In 1963 and 1966 he received the President of India Award. In addition, acting upon the influence of his father, who had taught him the value of teaching music, he established the Ali Akbar College of Music in Berkeley, California, in 1967, and moved the school to a new location in Marin County two years later. For a long time, he had attempted to set up a school in his homeland, with little success. "For thirty years I struggled to establish a teaching institution in Calcutta," he told Rao. "But it wasn't possible. No response."

By the mid-1960s the West was receptive to listening to and learning about Indian music. A large part of the general public had became aware of Indian music due to the interest in the form by popular rock musicians, such as George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds, both of whom integrated Indian instrumentation into their own compositions. The essence of Indian music fit well with the times, and many in the youth movement were willing and ready to explore ideas that were either ancient, revolutionary, exotic, or esoteric.

Complex in form, Indian music is also spiritual and contemplative. Although a performer, Khan sees himself more as a listener and as an extension of his sarod, and he can lose his sense of self while performing. Indian music, he explained to Rao, "is like a meditation, like going to temple. Music makes your heart very, very, very clear. You can feel what is peace, what is friendship, what is love, what you can do for others. Even when you hear, it is like fresh air, clean water - even if you don't understand it, when you hear it, it is pure."

The West Embraced Indian Music
By the mid-to late 1960s classical Indian musicians such as Khan and Shankar were appearing at U.S. and U.K. music festivals, including the ground-breaking Monterey Pop Festival in San Francisco in 1967 and the first Woodstock music festival held in Bethel, New York, in 1969. In fact, Indian music became a staple at such events, while also gaining its largest mass-audience exposure with The Concert for Bangladesh, a documentary film of a musical benefit organized by Harrison to raise funds for the starving people of that country. The performing lineup included some of the most famous rock stars of the era including Harrison, Ringo Starr, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and Leon Russell as well as Shankar, who was accompanied for the event by Khan, Alla Rakah, and Kamala Chakravarty. (For his own concerts, Khan was most often accompanied by Pandit Swapan Chaudhuri on the tabla and son Alam on the sarode.)

During this period, Khan's fame on the international circuit was second only to that of Shankar due to Shankar's longer association with the Beatles. While Shankar had by now divorced Khan's sister, Annapurna, Shankar remained a disciple of Allauddin Khan. Shankar and Khan performed together for the final time at Montpellier, France, in July of 1985. Despite many pleas and generous offers, they never performed together again.

Honors and Awards Accumulated
In 1971 Khan received a Gold Disc award for his appearance on the bestselling Concert for Bangladesh album. The previous year, he earned a Grammy nomination for the recording Shree Rag. In 1973 and 1974 he received doctor of literature degrees from the Rabindra Bharati University in Calcutta, India, and the University of Dacca in Bangladesh, respectively.

In 1979 Khan started his own recording label, Alam Medina Music Productions label, named after his son. Throughout the next decade his recorded output was prolific. He released six albums in 1980, three in 1981, and four in 1982. In 1983, the year he released two more albums, he was again nominated for a Grammy award, this time for Misra Piloo. The following year he released four more albums and received a doctor of letters degree from the University of Delhi, India. From 1985 to 1986 Khan released nine more albums.

In addition to recording, Khan invested time in teaching. In 1985 he opened a new branch of his music school in Switzerland. In 1988, the year he produced his first music video, he received the Padma Vibhusan award, which is the highest honor presented to a civilian in India. He continued amassing honors and awards throughout the 1990s, in 1991 alone receiving the Kalidas Sanman award from the Madya Pradesh Academy of Music and Fine Arts as well as an honorary doctorate degree in arts from the California Institute of the Arts. He also became the first Indian musician to receive a MacArthur Foundation fellowship. The following year, he received the Mahatma Gandhi Cultural Award in London. In 1993 he was honored with the titles of Hathi Saropao and Dowari Tajeem during the Jodhpur Palace's Golden Jubilee Celebration, and also received the Bill Graham Lifetime Achievement Award from the Bay Area Music Awards Foundation.

Established Akbar Foundation
In 1994 Khan founded the Ali Akbar Khan Foundation to fund the Baba Allauddin Khan Institute, a library and archive dedicated to the preservation of his own compositions as well as his father's. This large-scale archiving project involves more than 30,000 compositions, including more than 10,000 compositions from the 16th through the 20th centuries. Khan's wife, sons, and students have joined their efforts to convert collections of music from old reel-to-reel tapes to digital master tapes.

In 1997, the year Khan celebrated his 75th birthday, he received the prestigious National Heritage fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. The presentation was made at the White House by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. That same year Khan became the second recipient, after filmmaker Satyajit Ray, to receive the Asian Paints Shiromani-Hall of Fame Award. In August of 1997, to celebrate the 50th year of India's independence, Khan performed at the United Nations in New York and at Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., at the request of the Indian Embassy.

Khan received yet another doctorate degree in 1998, this one from the Viswa Bharati University in Shantiniketan, India. He also received the Indira Gandhi Gold Plaque from the Asiatic Society of Calcutta. That same year, Willie L. Brown Jr., mayor of San Francisco, proclaimed October 18th "Ustad Ali Akbar Khan Day." In 1999 Khan was appointed adjunct professor to the Department of Music at the University of California at Santa Cruz. In this position he gave concerts and conducted classes and workshops. He also advised the Arts Division in developing courses and resources in classical music of India.

In 2002, to celebrate his life and times, Khan performed an 80th birthday concert at the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco. He was accompanied by his 20-year old son Alam and tabla player Swapan Chaudhuri. Also that year, he received an honorary degree in musical arts from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Like his father before him, Khan has continued teaching and performing, although he gradually has cut down on his public performances. Also like his father, much of Khan's time is devoted to teaching his son, Alam.

1. Raag Pilu
2. Raag Durga

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Balkan Beat Box - Blue Eyed Black Boy

Posted By MiOd On 10:54 AM 0 comments
Most world music bands concentrate on a mash-up of African, Caribbean, and African American styles, but as you can probably guess from the band's name, that's not the case with Balkan Beat Box. Drummer and beatmaster Tamir Muskat and sax player Ori Kaplan, the band's core members, are both Israeli immigrants and met while they were playing in Gogol Bordello. They've adopted that band's freewheeling feel for fusing disparate Eastern European musics into something that's greater than the sum of its parts. The fractured meters of Balkan music may be pop's last frontier, but by combining them with the familiar pulse of reggae, rock, and hip-hop -- not to mention the gypsy music of the Arab world and the Mediterranean -- Balkan Beat Box has created something unique and eminently danceable. The drumming on Blue Eyed Black Boy was recorded in real time with real instruments, then diced and sampled to give the music the feel of a live gig. With special guests Orkestar Jovica Ajdarevica and the Serbian gypsy band Kal in tow, BBB take their sound to another level of excitement. "War Again" is an asymmetrical bit of Balkan dancehall reggae with MC Tomer Yosef delivering a powerful plea for peace over the massed ompah of the Orkestar Jovica Ajdarevica brass band. Orkestar Jovica is also featured on a couple of instrumentals -- "Balcumbia," adds Arab, flamenco, and cumbia beats to the mix, while "Smatron" gives Orkestar members a chance to show off their chops with lengthy solos delivered over a smooth, funky reggae beat. The title track is a lullaby for Yosef's new son, a lilting reggae rocker with some striking spaghetti western twang. The song's message of tolerance for people of all ethnicities and colors is still more a prayer than a reality, but it's a timely nod to the multi-cultural society we now inhabit. The set also includes the Balkan R&B of "My Baby," the funky Bulgarian salsa of "Lijepa Mare," and "Move It," a dance-happy blend of Punjabi, Balkan, and Jamaican beats. Ten years ago, nobody would have expected Gogol Bordello's gypsy punk music to break into the mainstream, but they signed with Columbia in 2010. Balkan Beat Box has a similar ethos, and the compelling combination of styles they've forged on Blue Eyed Black Boy shows them capable of making the leap from the underground to the A-list.

01. "Intro" 0:31
02. "Move It" 3:56
03. "Blue Eyed Black Boy" 3:22
04. "Marcha de la Vida" 4:08
05. "Dancing with the Moon" 3:48
06. "Kabulectro" 3:44
07. "My Baby" 4:06
08. "Balcumbia" 3:20
09. "Look Them Act" 3:30
10. "Smatron" 3:50
11. "Lijepa Mare" 3:36
12. "Why" 3:07
13. "Buhala" 4:39
14. "War Again" 3:08

* Tomer Yosef - lead vocals, percussion, samples
* Ori Kaplan - saxophone
* Tamir Muskat - drums, percussion, programming

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Amelia Cuni - Ocean Of Colours

Posted By MiOd On 4:24 PM 0 comments
Ocean of Colours
A Homage to Pandit Bidur Mallik
Amelia Cuni/Manik Munde
Amelia Cuni is an Italian singer of Indian classical music. She was trained under Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Khan Dagar and has performed traditional dhrupad concerts internationally.

On "Ocean of Colours" Amelia Cuni pays homage to Pandit Bidur Mallik, one of her most influential teachers. The album was recorded in London in 1995.

AMELIA CUNI is singer, composer and performer. She has trained her voice and musical skills in India, according to the tradition of DHRUPAD singing and KATHAK dance. Her present work includes early and contemporary music and collaborations with artists of international repute. Her own multimedia performance ASHTAYAMA-SONG OF HOURS has been presented in seveveral international festivals in Europe and USA. Her latest work is JOHN CAGE's SOLO 58 (microtonal ragas from his SONG BOOKS, 1970), in co-production with several European new music venues. Her music is featured on various CD productions. She is engaged in the trasmission of the musical knowlegde she received in India and teaches regular classes and workshops in Italy and Germany.

There have been and there will be many artists and works influencing my music and my understanding of art. First of all, my main Indian music teachers: R.Fahimuddin Dagar, Bidur Mallik and sons, Dilip Chandra Vedi, Manjushri Chatterjee, Raja Chattrapati Singh. In Europe, I have become acquainted with some of the great contemporary artists through my partner Werner Durand. Many are the composers whose music has had an impact on my own creations. First of all, the ones with whom I have collaborated and therefore came to know well: Terry Riley, Chico Mello, Maria de Alvear, Roland Pfrengle, Francis Silkstone, Fernando Grillo, Ulrich Krieger a.o. John Cage deserves a special mention, since the in-depth work I have done on his '18 microtonal ragas' has taken me a long way forward in the path I am treading between worlds and cultures.

1. Raga Desi Alap
2. Raga Desi Chautal
3. Raga Hindol Alap
4. Raga Hindol Dhamar
5. Raga Shankara Alap/Raga Shankara Sultal

Personnel: Amelia Cuni (vocals, tanpura); Manik Munde (drum).

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Songs From A Persian Garden

Posted By MiOd On 4:02 PM 0 comments
Songs From A Persian Garden
Mahsa and Marjan Vahdat
Dirty Linen (p.57) - "The arrangements are modern in style, with a light jazz backing on most with the setar and flute adding the eastern elements. One standout track is 'Dorna,' which features just the two singers trading off vocal lines for almost seven minutes."
Global Rhythm (Publication) (p.54) - "[Their voices] flow with unrivaled grace an sorrow, blending into one intimate harmony."

Resonating with lush instrumentation and the sacred, lyrical richness of Persian poetry, this album represents a very important milestone in contemporary Iranian history. On May 22nd, 2007 the Italian and Norwegian embassies helped Mahsa and Marjan Vahdat plan a musical performance in Tehran, where women are banned from singing solo in public. Taking the stage without veils, the sisters stood together before that audience, bravely wielding the weapon of music against the continued oppression of women. The duo is now performing internationally and continuing to campaign against censorship.

On May 22, 2007 a remarkable concert was held in a Persian garden in Tehran. With the help of both the Italian and Norwegian Embassies, two Iranian sisters, Mahsa and Marjan Vahdat performed without veils and bravely chose to use their music as a weapon against the oppression of women in their country. This concert was recorded and released by Norwegian label, Kirkelig Kulturverksted (KKV), late last year. Songs From a Persian Garden was produced by Erik Hillestad who also put together the critically acclaimed Lullabies From The Axis of Evil.

...If we want to understand what treasures we may find in the fantastic country of Iran, we should listen to the magic and the power given to its music and poetry. The fact that women in this huge country of 70 million people will never stop singing wherever they can and because of the intolerant doctrines and laws, Iranian officials contribute to making their singing one of the most powerful weapons to fight all kinds of reduction of the human rights in their country. --Erik Hillestad

The US version of Songs From A Persian Garden will also include a duet with Mahsa and Melissa Etheridge on Bob Dylan s I Shall Be Released .

Mahsa and Marjan were introduced to the American public on Lullabies... with Sad Sol , a duet with English diva, Sarah Jane Morris and a traditional Iranian Lullaby, Lalala Gohle Laleh .

This (mostly) live album from a pair of Iranian sisters is an absolute melodic feast. Sampling the range of music -- from the classical modes of "Saghi Nameh" to the opening lush Kurdish theme of "Mina" -- is a joy, and nowhere more than on "Dorna," where their voices shine, largely unaccompanied, on a more contemporary piece that manages to sound timeless. There are some fascinating little diversions, as when the lullaby "Gole Laleh" morphs into the spiritual "She's Got the Whole World in Her Hands" (note the gender change!) sung softly by guitarist Knut Reiersrud, who also brings a lot to this CD instrumentally. Apart from the lovingly sinuous voices, what impresses most is the rich, loving variety of sensual and exotic melodies filling the disc. It's close to a sensory overload -- but stops short, just at the perfect point.

(01). Mina
(02). Bi Man Maro
(03). Haleili
(04). The Flower of a Paradise Garden
(05). Chahar Pareh
(06). Dorna
(07). Gole Laleh - She's Got the Whole World In Her Hands
(08). Doosh Doosh
(09). Avaze Shoushtari
(10). Saghi Nameh
(11). I Shall Be Released

Personnel: Mahsa and Marjan Vahdat (vocals); Knut Reiersrud (vocals, guitar); Marjan Vahdat, Mahsa Vadat (vocals, daf); Atabak Elyasi (setar); Amir Eslami (ney); David Wallumrod (keyboards); Rune Arnesen (drums, percussion).

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Dennis Koster - Flamenco Clasico

Posted By MiOd On 6:11 AM 0 comments
Dennis Koster's beautiful flamenco guitar music evokes the individual styles of the great masters of the past. Koster's playing is his own, to be sure, but he manages to put the stamp of a Sabicas or Montoya on the particular toque he is playing. Koster offers an interesting program of concert flamenco that seems to be the preferred style of expression instead of the traditional accompaniment of singers and dancers. Koster's selections are tasteful and express the beauty of the music of flamenco and the art's best players of the past 60 years.

1. Farruca
2. Granadinas
3. Danza Mora
4. Tarantas
5. Alegrias
6. Siguiriyas
7. Rondenas
8. Soleares
9. Lamentos Y Tangos
10. Bulerias

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Ali Akbar Khan & Alam Khan - From Father To Son

Posted By MiOd On 9:14 PM 0 comments
The Wire (9/02, p.70) - "...Ali Akbar Khan is the master of the sarod, a lute with Afghani roots....There's an air of masterclass about the performance..."
Indian music will always have its traditionalists and its contemporary pop artists; this is true in India itself, and it is true in England and other countries that attract a lot of Indian immigrants. When the 21st century arrived, Ali Akbar Khan was considered an elder statesman of traditional Indian classical music -- April 13, 2002, in fact, marked the veteran sarod virtuoso's 80th birthday. Khan was still 79 when he recorded From Father to Son, which has that title because it features his son, Alam Khan. This CD (which documents a May 2001 concert at St. John's Presbyterian Church in Berkeley, CA) finds Ali Akbar Khan leading a trio; Alam Khan is also a sarod player, and the third musician is tabla drummer Swapan Chaudhuri. Together, the three musicians perform an extended version of the traditional "Ragini Puriya Dhanasri." Their inspired performance lasts 58 minutes, and the trio has no problem maintaining one's attention. Ali Akbar Khan has long enjoyed a reputation as one of the best in his field, and Alam -- although not nearly as experienced as his father -- has much potential as a sarod player. In the past, Ali Akbar Khan has experimented with synthesizers; 1990's Journey, for example, is among his more technology-friendly efforts. But there are no high-tech synthesizers on From Father to Son. Purists will be happy to know that an acoustic format prevails on this CD, which is a fine document of a 79-year-old Khan in the early 21st century.

Personnel: Ali Akbar Khan, Swapan Chaudhuri, Alam Khan, James Pomerantz.

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Sussan Deyhim - City of Leaves

Posted By MiOd On 2:58 PM 0 comments
“Sussan Deyhim is a fascinating original voice in music and the arts. Her rich and complex vocals are warm, beautifully sung, and always surprising. I’m proud that she is and has been a member of our ‘Voicestra’ for many years.”
Sussan Deyhim is an Iranian composer, vocalist and performance artist. She is internationally known for creating a unique sonic and vocal language imbued with a sense of ritual and the unknown. She was part of the national ballet company in Iran from the age of thirteen and she traveled all across Iran studying with master folk musicians and dancers. In 1976 she joined The Bejart Ballet in Europe after receiving a scholarship to attend Bejarts’ performance art school Mudra where she was trained in many of the great world, dance, music and theater traditions as well as in classical ballet. Her music remains true to the spirit of her ancient heritage while pointing to the future with a very personal and poetic dramatic sensibility. In 1980 she moved to New York embarking on a multifaceted career encompassing music, theatre, dance, media and film. She created/starred in ground breaking media operas at La Mama in the ‘80s including Azax/ Attra and The Ghost of Ibn Sabah.

Sussan’s wide-ranging collaborations with leading artists from across the spectrum of contemporary art have included, Ornette Coleman, Bobby McFerrin, Peter Gabriel, Bill Laswell, Talvin Singh, Micky Hart, Branford Marsalis, Jerry Garcia, Doug Wimbish, Adrian Sherwood and The Blue Man Group and with two of the most prominent female visual artists Shirin Neshat and Sophie Calle.
Her composition Windfall/Beshno Az Ney was recently used by U2 throughout the US and Europe. “U2s 360 tour” in one of the largest scale tock tours to this day. Beshno Az Ney is an intro to U2 “Sunday Bloody Sunday” a moving number in solidarity with Iran’s Green movement.

Sussan has performed with international orchestras such as the Polish Radio Orchestra and the Krakow Philharmonic and has received commissions as a composer from international ensembles such as Bang On A Can. She has performed her music at Lincoln Center Summer Festival, Carnegie Recital Hall, Albert Hall, The Old Vic, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Royce Hall and many other major venues.

1. City Of Leaves
2. Tender Gaze
3. Glyphs On The Horizon
4. Dukebox
5. Searching For You
6. Fire Within
7. Autumn
8. Beshno Az Ney/Windfall
9. Secret Garden

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Nguyen Le - Songs of Freedom

Posted By MiOd On 12:51 PM 0 comments
For over twenty years, Nguyên Lê has collaborated with a growing cadre of like-minded musicians—mostly Paris-based, where the guitarist of Vietnamese origins resides—building a body of work that is, in the truest sense of the word, "world music." From the Afro-centric band Ultramarine, and exploration of his own roots on the seminal Tales from Vietnam (ACT, 1996), to recent explorations of a nexus where programming and spontaneity meet on Homescape (ACT, 2006), Lê has carved out a unique space—often fusion-like in its electricity and energy, but avoiding the negative connotations; undeniably jazz-centric, too, but largely eschewing overt references to traditionalism. These days, plenty of jazzers draw on pop music, but you'd be hard-pressed to find another taking a crack at one of the 1960s' most iconic—and, often, reviled—songs, Iron Butterfly's "In A Gadda Da Vida," as Lê does on Songs of Freedom.

With an unorthodox core quartet, reliant on mallet instruments for much of its chordal support, Lê tackles other '60s chestnuts, like Cream's "Sunshine of Your Love"—which, after a seemingly non sequitur introduction, filled with thundering percussion and wailing voices, turns relatively faithful, albeit at a brisker pace and with an uncharacteristic complexity of percussive detail. But once singer Himiko Paganotti gets past the first verse and chorus, the harmonic center shifts, and suddenly, with vibraphonist Illya Amar layering a shifting cushion of chords over bassist Linley Marthe's lithe underpinning, the song turns into an odd-metered solo feature for Lê, his mesh of oriental microtonality and occidental grit and grease moving in parallel with background vocal percussion, leading to a knotty, thundering finale.

As for "In A Gadda Da Vida," sure, its near-Jungian riff remains intact, but delivered on marimba, and driven by drummer Stéphane Galland's lithe 17/8 pulse, there's none of the original's gravitas, as Lê takes its preexisting Indo-centricity further, giving it an idiosyncratic arrangement; its chorus gradually building to staggering contrapuntal confluence and impressive solos from Lê and Amar, before a newly composed section leads to an ostinato-driven drum solo that avoids all the clichés of the original...all in a nice, compact five minutes.

Elsewhere, Lê tackles The Beatles' "Eleanor Rigby," with Youn Sun Nah making one of two guest appearances (the other, a tabla and konnakol-driven version of Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" ), the guitarist's swirling, ethereal guitar lines supporting the singer during an extended intro before the band enters, eastern linearity meeting western harmonies in Guo Gan's erhu and Lê's electric guitar, for a more subdued yet undeniably grooving album opener.

When it comes to interpreting music in a jazz context, freedom more often than not means improvisational freedom, and to be sure, Songs of Freedom has plenty of that. But clearly, for Lê, the concept has more to do with an unfettered prerogative to draw on what, in many cases, are the simplest of song forms, as grist for far more elaborate compositional reworks filled with pointillist detail. Songs of Freedom combines heartfelt respect with absolute irreverence, breathing an utterly different kind of life into these songs, four decades after they first hit the airwaves.

(01). Eleanor Rigby
(02). I Wish
(03). Ben Zeppelin
(04). Black Dog
(05). Pastime Paradise
(06). Uncle Ho’s Benz
(07). Mercedes Benz
(08). Over The Rainforest
(09). Move Over
(10). Whole Lotta Love
(11). Redemption Song
(12). Sunshine Of Your Love
(13). In A Gadda Da Vida
(14). Topkapi
(15). Come Together

Flac tracks (EAC Rip): 460 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 170 MB | Scans

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Mondo Beat 2 - Masters of Percussion

Posted By MiOd On 6:27 AM 0 comments
In many ways, the sheer idea of a popular drumming compilation sounds at odds with itself. Next to the voice, the drum might be humankind's oldest instrument, but putting it in a context where people who aren't ethnomusicologists want to hear a whole album of it isn't easy. But while several different styles are illustrated here, one that doesn't get mentioned is drum programming, which plays an important part on several tracks -- a slight irony, perhaps. However, if you look at it as a compilation of drumming in its widest sense, this works, ranging from the tribally inflected "Ceremony of Passage" to the Celtic-Indian mix of the Dhol Foundation, and the surprising experiment of Charlie Watts and Jim Keltner working together on a homage to one of jazz's great drummers, "Kenny Clarke." Given the stylistic variations of the tracks, there's a good flow to the disc and a valid exploration of many percussive styles. And best of all, it makes for some very good, strong listening. ~ Chris Nickson

This album features masters of percussion from around the world, but it is rather uneven in quality. The opening cut "Ceremony of Passage" by Greg Elis/Vas is exciting, with rhythms reminiscent of Santana and Rusted Root. But the rest of the album does not hold up to this excellent opening cut. The mix of instruments, from tabla, dohl, sitar, Aftrican drums, bells, wood flute and synthesizer, is interesting, but the total effect of all the selections is not harmonious together on one CD.

There are a few good jazz selections, "Wheel of Time" by Mickey Hart and Planet Drum in particular, but the rest of the album just doesn't hang together. Unless you are an afficionado of the artists on this album, I'd probably not recommend it.

What's included:
Ceremony of Passage-- Greg Ellis/Vas
Secret Channgel-- Tabla Beat Science from "Tabla Matrix"
Downtown-- Gabrielle Roth and the Mirros from "Zone Unknown"
Iridian-- Dhol Foundation from "Big Drums Small World"

Wheel of Time-- Mickey Hart & Planet Drum from "Supralingua"
Batuka do Indio--Airto Moreira (never released before)
The Tree of Rhythm--Taufiq
Kenny Clarke Charlie Eatts Jim Keltner Project
Journey to JungleMoon Brent Lewis
Kuromo -- Kisuru Adepoju and Afrika Heartbeat
Duden (Spooky Remix) Natacha Atlas

01. Ceremony of Passage
02. Secret Channel
03. Downtown
04. Iridian
05. Wheel of Time
06. Batuka do Indio
07. The Tree of Rhythm
08. Kenny Clarke
09. Journey to Junglemoon
10. Kurumo (Kru Man)
11. Duden [Spooky Remix]

Flac tracks (EAC Rip): 360 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 135 MB | Front Cover

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Japan Traditional Vocal & Instrumental Music

Posted By MiOd On 8:56 PM 0 comments
Soloists of the Ensemble Nipponia
Japan Traditional Vocal & Instrumental Music
This really is one of the best CDs of Japanese music out there. The music is incredible, with virtuosi performances by the Ensemble Nipponia that are talented, inspired, authentic, and approachable. Every track is a wonder to hear. The music itself covers a broad range of different types and moods of Japanese music and features all four of the major musical instruments (clearly identified on the track list on the back), making this CD the perfect crash course in Japan's music for those just beginning to acquaint themselves with it--and of course it's a classic that bears repeated listenings over the years for those whose acquaintance is longer.

1. Kumoi Jishi (shakuhachi) [5:45]
2. Ozatsuma (shamisen) [2:47]
3. Ogi no Mato ('The Folding Fan as a Target') (voice, biwa) [10:43]
4. Edo Lullaby (shakuhachi, shamisen, biwa, 2 kotos, betis) [3:49]
5. Godanginuta (2 kotos) [12:01]
6. Esashi Oiwake ('Esashi Pack-horseman's Song') (shakuhachi) [2:41]
7. Mushi no Aikata ('Insect Interlude') (shamisen) [2:32]
8. Azuma Jishi ('Azuma Lion Dance') (voice, shakuhachi, shamisen, koto) [5:10]

Ape (EAC Rip): 180 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 105 MB | Front Cover

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Phil Thornton - Flying

Posted By MiOd On 5:35 PM 0 comments
Phil Thornton is now closely associated with the British New Age music movement, but he is also an accomplished guitarist and has had a long touring and recording association with Sinead O'Connor. He is a regular member of the neo-psychedelic English band Mandragon, and he has worked with Gordon Giltrap, Talking Heads, Stallion, Die Laughing, Naked Lunch, 4 B 2's, and Expandis. Thornton augments his musical talents as an accomplished studio producer.

Thornton's first "non-rhythm" New Age work was the film score for Cloud Sculpting, which was later released on the New World Music, home to most of his recordings. On this project, he met didgeridoo player Steven Cragg, with whom he recorded Initiation and Tibetan Horn. In his Sussex, England, recording studio, Expandibubble, Thornton continues to explore new limits of sequenced electronic music (Alien Encounter) and the insights of tribal and ethnic cultures (Shaman).

(01) Into The Tradewind
(02) The Height Below
(03) Icarus Rising
(04) Sirocco
(05) Laughter In Heaven
(06) Mistral
(07) The Gravity Enigma

# Acoustic Guitar – Ian Barnet
# Bass [Fretless] – Grant Young
# Mixed By – Will Thomson

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SHANKAR - Sitar Concertos & Other Works

Posted By MiOd On 1:32 PM 0 comments
Ravi Shankar is the Indian-born sitar player who helped introduce the instrument to the West. His virtuosity on the instrument has made him the musician that all other sitar players look up to.

Tutored on sitar as a young boy, Shankar began performing as a teen in the 1930s although he took further training, under Indian music maestro Allaudin Khan, from 1938 until l944. As his reputation in India grew, he wrote scores for Indian films, music for ballet and became the music director for All India Radio.

He began to tour outside India in the 50s and 60s, during which time there was a rise in interest in eastern culture in Europe and the States. George Harrison studied the sitar under him, and The Beatles had him play on “Norwegian Wood”, from the Rubber Soul album. The track has since been described as among the first world music recordings. In 1966 this greater attention led to invites to play at the Monterey Pop Festival and Woodstock.

Shankar’s collaborations helped to introduce his music to listeners not necessarily versed in Indian traditional music. He has worked with Philip Glass, George Harrison and Russian State musicians, including a folk ensemble and the Moscow State Orchestra.

Shankar regularly tours with the cream of Indian musicians, and has worked with his daughter Anoushka, who he taught to play the sitar. He has also written work for films, and included in his credits are the Oscar nominated Ghandi and Indian film director Satyajit Ray’s Apu trilogy.

This is more than two hours of acclaimed sitar master Ravi Shankar grooving with a variety of Western orchestral instruments in both classical Western and classical Indian musical settings.

The former includes two concertos for sitar and orchestra; the latter includes two ragas and other traditional works.

Shankar is joined by plenty of heavy hitters. The conductors for the two concertos are Andre Previn and Zubin Mehta; Yehudi Menuhin and Jean-Pierre Rampal are the top classical music soloists to join Shankar on other pieces.

And the creativity to write the two concertos? Incredible.

And, the recording quality on these two CDs, including the degree of stereo separation on the smaller instrumented pieces, is great. For example, the Morning Love had fantastic sound, and separation, between the sitar and tabla. Made me feel like I was on a rug about six feet away from two real performers, just as my speakers are.

CD: 1
(01). Morning Love (based on Raga Nata Bhairav) (1998 Digital Remaster) Jean-Pierre Rampal/Ravi Shankar/Alla Rakha/Kamala Chakravarti
(02). Raga Piloo (1998 Digital Remaster) Yehudi Menuhin/Ravi Shankar/Alla Rakha/Kamala Chakravarti
(03). Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali) (1998 Digital Remaster) Yehudi Menuhin/Alla Rakha
(04). Concerto for Sitar & Orchestra (1998 Digital Remaster): First movement: Raga Khamaj Ravi Shankar/Terence Emery/London Symphony Orchestra/André Previn
(05). Concerto for Sitar & Orchestra (1998 Digital Remaster): Second movement: Raga Sindhi Bhairavi Ravi Shankar/Terence Emery/London Symphony Orchestra/André Previn
(06). Concerto for Sitar & Orchestra (1998 Digital Remaster): Third movment: Raga Adana Ravi Shankar/Terence Emery/London Symphony Orchestra/André Previn
(07). Concerto for Sitar & Orchestra (1998 Digital Remaster): Fourth movement: Raga Manj Khamaj Ravi Shankar/Terence Emery/London Symphony Orchestra/André Previn

CD: 2
(01). Raga Puriya Kalyan (1998 Digital Remaster) Ravi Shankar
(02). Swara-Kakali (based on Raga Tilang) (1998 Digital Remaster) Ravi Shankar/Yehudi Menuhin
(03). Raga Mala - A Garland of Ragas (Concerto No. 2 for Sitar & Orchestra): I. Lalit (Presto) Ravi Shankar/London Philharmonic Orchestra/Zubin Mehta
(04). Raga Mala - A Garland of Ragas (Concerto No. 2 for Sitar & Orchestra): II. Bairagi (Moderato) Ravi Shankar/London Philharmonic Orchestra/Zubin Mehta
(05). Raga Mala - A Garland of Ragas (Concerto No. 2 for Sitar & Orchestra): III. Yaman Kalyan (Moderato) Ravi Shankar/London Philharmonic Orchestra/Zubin Mehta
06. Raga Mala - A Garland of Ragas (Concerto No. 2 for Sitar & Orchestra): IV. Mian ki Malhar (Allegro) Ravi Shankar/London Philharmonic Orchestra/Zubin Mehta

* Zubin Mehta - Conductor
* Alla Rakha - Tabla
* Kamala Chakravarti - Tanpura
* Jean-Pierre Rampal - Flute
* Sir Yehudi Menuhin - Violin
* Ravi Shankar - Sitar
* André Previn - Conductor
* Christopher Parker, Neville Boyling, Frank Abbey - Engineers
* Simon Gibson - Remastering

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