Remember Shakti - Saturday Night In Bombay

Posted By MiOd On 1:42 PM 0 comments

"This album is "a must have" for all music lovers (not just jazz or fusion or world or Indian music). ”

"The percussion glides and Shankar Mahadevan makes the reply. ”

"It is an adaptation of indian music to a jazz vernacular that reflects a continuing flirtation of the western musical avant-garde with other cultural idioms.”

This CD recorded live in India in Dec. of 2000 features the same musicians as "Believer" with many guest artists along for the ride. The CD features John McLaughlin on guitar, U. Shrinivas on mandolin, Zakir Hussain on tablas, and V. Selvaganesh on kanjira, gatham and mridangam. Joining these musicians at what McLaughlin calls a "Shakti Summit" is vocalist Shankar Mahadevan; Hindustani slide guitarist Debashish Bhattacharya; santur player Shiv Kumar Sharma; drummer-percussionist (traps) Sivamani; dholak players Bhavani Shankar (also playing pakhawaj), Roshan Ali, and Aziz; Taufiq Quareshi playing def, dafli and perc.; and A. K. Pallanivel on tavil. There are only four tracks on this CD in which only the first track called "Luki" written by McLaughlin features all of the musicians except Sharma. The piece begins with a short repetitive phrase for all the melody instruments than the theme begins in unison. A short exchange of solos of 8 beats each between the Bhattacharya and McLaughlin. Then the same happens between Mahadevan and Shrinivas. The piece ends with a statement of the theme again. The second piece by Sharma called "Shringar" features only McLaughlin, Sharma, Hussain and Selvaganesh. This is the longest (26.5 min) and is the slowest to develop. It is a traditional duet performance between the santur and guitar that begins with the slow introduction to the raga with Sharma and McLaughlin taking turns. The raga eventually builds and as the tabla and kanjira make their entrance. The improvisation ends as the tempo increases ending in a frenzy of notes. "Giriraj Sudha" the third piece on this disc composed by U. Shrinivas. Beginning with a statement of the raga between Mandolin and voice. Then the vocalist sings on an undisclosed text with mandolin, tabla, mridangam and tavil providing the background accompaniment. Solos between Mahadevan, singing the note names in the traditional way, and Shrinivas follow. According to the liner notes McLaughlin plays on the tune but I don't hear him. The last work by Hussain is called "Bell' Allah." This features Great solos by McLaughlin, Shrinivas, and Bhatacharya followed by kanjira and tabla solos and duets later joined by the drummer. I always wonder what happed to the rest of the music played at these concerts. I am sure there was more than the 62 minutes presented on this disc.

1. Luki
2. Shringar
3. Giriraj Sudha
4. Bell' Alla

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Shujaat Khan - Raga Malkauns

Posted By MiOd On 5:01 AM 0 comments
Raga Malkauns music CDs a beautiful lyrical performance of a "major" raga by the son of Vilayat Khan; Shujaat is one of the finest younger sitar players on the scene, and studied his craft at the Univ. Raga Malkauns songs of Washington in Seattle; he is currently an artist in residence/teacher...

This CD is absolutely the best CD of classical Hindustani music I've ever heard!! Raga Malkauns is a truly great rag, known for its late night samay and its relationship to the djinns. It has been said that playing of raga malkauns will attract djinns and that consecutive playing will result in a gift of treasure from the djinns. I've been playing this CD non-stop but no treasure yet!!
I was lucky enough to catch Ustad Shujaat Khan in concert and was completely blown away. His subtlety and absolute perfect conception of the ragas is truly stunning and his mastery of the instrument is colossal. His fingers glide as if they were greased with butter.
This CD is truly a gem of the khyal style of Hindustani music, I highly recommend it to absolutely anybody! It also has very extensive liner notes and explanations as well as personal interviews with Ustad Khan.

1. Vilambit gat in tintal
2. Madhya Gat in tintal
3. Drut gat in Ektal
4. Drut gat in tintal

Personnel: Shujaat Khan (sitar); Shyam Kane (tabla)

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Ravi Shankar - Ravi Shankar

Posted By MiOd On 11:13 PM 0 comments
Ravi Shankar is the 20th century's most famous player of the complex stringed instrument known as the sitar. The 1950s were possibly Shankar's most creative period: he composed and performed, worked as musical director of All-India Radio in Delhi, created the Vadya Vrinda Chamber Orchestra, scored films (most notably the Apu Trilogy of director Satyajit Ray) and began touring the world and winning acclaim for himself and for Indian music. In the 1960s Shankar grew still more famous for his influence on The Beatles, who used a sitar in some of their more psychedelic tunes. (Shankar was particular friends with George Harrison, who produced some of Shankar's later albums.) As years passed Shankar became known less as a performer and more as an elder statesman of world music. In 2000 he was given the French Legion of Honor, and in 2001 he was awarded an honorary knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II.

CD1 EAST GREETS EAST - RAVI SHANKAR IN JAPAN

[01]. [east Greets East - Ravi Shankar In Japan] Padhasapa
[02]. Kaharwa
[03]. Improvisation On The Theme Of Rokudan
[04]. Namah Shivaya
[05]. Tribute To Nippon
[06]. [ragas Hameer & Gara] Raga Hameer

CD2 RAGAS HAMEER & GARA (Fortsetzung)

[01]. [ragas Hameer & Gara (fortsetzung)]
[02]. Tala Farodast
[03]. Raga Gara
[04]. [raga Jogeshwari] Alap
[05]. Jor
[06]. Gat I

CD3 RAGA JOGESHWARI (Fortsetzung)

[01]. [raga Jogeshwari (fortseztzung)] Gat Ii
[02]. [homage To Mahatma Gandhi, Raga Hemant]
[03]. [homage To Baba Allauddin, Raga Hemant]

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France: Landes de Gascogne - La Cornemuse

Posted By MiOd On 4:18 AM 0 comments
France. Landes de Gascogne. La Cornemuse, 1996
France: Landes de Gascogne, La Cornemuse [Ocora C 560051] is another CD that focuses on the bagpipes of a particular French region. Unlike Chabretas, it features five different pipers. Four of these are what we would call “revivalists”: people who, in the 70s, learned to build and play the bagpipes of the Landes, reinventing the tradition as they went. The fifth piper featured on the disc is Jeanty Benquet, considered the last of the traditional Landes pipers; Benquet died in 1957, leaving behind only one recording, from which three selections appear on this collection. While we must imagine that Benquet’s playing is closer to the “old style” of Landes piping, we know that he was a cosmopolitan traveler and a semi-professional entertainer, and thus subject to outside influences. No other recording of a traditional Landes piper was ever made, and this one was discovered only recently. Therefore, the post-1968 revival of Landes piping is based much more on Slavic models, and on personal creativity, than on the Landes past. It is an excellent example of a creatively invented tradition. The four revivalists all play their instruments with aplomb, some alone and others with accompaniment from fiddlers, hurdy-gurdy players and clarinetists. Most of the melodies are intended for dancing, and they have a breezy lift that makes for most pleasant listening — provided one likes the sharp tones of the bagpipe to begin with. One interesting feature of the Landes pipe is a short pipe for accompaniment of the melody. It can be sounded more or less continuously as a drone, or used rhythmically like the regulators of the Irish uillean pipes and the trompette of the French hurdy-gurdy. It adds a bit of texture and complexity to several of the tunes on this disc, and is especially noticeable in Benquet’s playing. Like Chabretas. (Rootsworld)

01. Patrice Bianco - Suite De Rondeaux
02. Patrice Bianco - Rondeau 'A Grenade'
03. Michel Harismendy - Valse 'Quoan V (is Ganhar')
04. Patrice Bianco - Scottiche
05. Patrice Bianco - Marches Du Bazadais
06. Michel Harismendy - Polka
07. Michel Harismendy - Rondeau
08. Robert Matta - Valse 'Cervesca'
09. Robert Matta - Fandango Et Arin-arin
10. Robert Matta - Rondeau 'Dessus Le Noste Trilhe' (Sur Notre Treille)
11. Robert Matta - Polka 'Marie Melody'
12. Bernard Desblancs - Suite De Congos
13. Bernard Desblancs - Noel 'Deche Me Droumi' (Lassie-Moi Dormir)
14. Bernard Desblancs - Scottiche
15. Bernard Desblancs - Rondeau 'Nid De La Lebe' (Le Nid Du Lievre)
16. Bernard Desblancs - Suite De Courantes
17. Bernard Desblancs - Suite De Trois Rondeaux
18. Alain Cadeillan - Margot/Janeton/Son D'eau/Cego Aderaldo (Suite Varie medley)
19. Alain Cadeillan - Miqueu Qu'a Nau Topins De Meu/Debat Mon Pe I'a Nau Junquets (airs De Noce Suvis De Deux Rondes medley)
20. Alain Cadeillan - Mazurka
21. Alain Cadeillan - atan Qu'aue/M'i an Balhat Un Mariton (Rondeaux medley)
22. Alain Cadeillan - Suite De Scottiches
23. Alain Cadeillan - Rondeau 'A Lo Coquin De Pire' (A Le Coquin De Pire)
24. Alain Cadeillan - Valse Monica
25. Jeanty Benquet - Congo
26. Jeanty Benquet - Ronde 'Au Barricot Du Novi' (Au Tonneau Du Marie)
27. Jeanty Benquet - La Bazadaise

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Pandit Jasraj - ChandraGhanta

Posted By MiOd On 11:07 PM 0 comments
Born in 1930 in Hissar (Haryana), Pandit Jasraj is one of the best-known classical vocalists. He belongs to the Mewati gharana, as did his father, Pandit Motiram. One of the joys of Jasraj's music is his depiction of the unusual. He has recorded extensively, especially since the late '80s, for a number of the leading companies specializing in Indian classical music including Chhanda Dhara

1. Chandraghanta, Ya Devi
2. Braje Basantham

Durga Jasraj (Vocal Support), Vijay Ghate (Tabla)

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Diga Rhythm Band

Posted By MiOd On 5:54 PM 0 comments
During a lull in activities with the Grateful Dead, percussionist and ethnomusicologist Mickey Hart joined with tabla player, Zakir Hussain, son of longtime Ravi Shankar accompanist, Alla Rakha, and students of the Ali Akbar College of Music to form the heavily percussive Diga Rhythm Band in 1975. Recording their sole album, Diga, in Hart's barn/studio in Novato, California, the 11-piece group was augmented by Jerry Garcia on guitar and Jim McPherson, Kathy McDonald and David Freiberg on vocals. One tune on the album, "Happiness Is Drumming (Fire on the Mountain) went on to be a staple at concerts by the Grateful Dead, the Other Ones and Hart's Planet Drum.

Formed as the Tal Vadya Rhythm Band in 1973, the group was renamed the Diga Rhythm Band following Hart's arrival two years later.

Hart severed his connection with the group after returning his focus to a re-energized Grateful Dead in 1976. He has continued to collaborate with Hussain, a charter member of Planet Drum. Other Diga Rhythm Band members who have remained active include tabla player Tor Dietrichson, who signed a solo contract with Global Pacific, and marimba player Jim Loveless, vibes player Ray Spiegel and duggi tarang and nal player Arshad Syed, who joined multi-ethnic fusion group, Ancient Future in 1993.

Originally released on the Grateful Dead's own label, Round records, Diga was released on CD in 1983 as part of a series of Hart-produced recordings issued by Rykodisc. ~ Craig Harris, Rovi

In each of Mickey Hart's albums, the artist submerges himself within a concept and reinvents himself through the project dujour. Hart's rhythmic journey as recorded in the studio has created some duds and crafted some gems. Fortunately, the Diga Rhythm Band produced one of his jewels. In this project, Hart's focus was on the sounds of India. That written, vibes and marimbas are the primary musical instruments on "Diga" -neither of which are Indian and no attempt is made to have them play Indian melodies. The absence of sitars on such a project almost seems odd. Unless the listener is expecting classical Indian sounds, this isn't necessarily a drawback. With respect to authenticity, Mickey Hart always produces his albums in a way that makes ethnic music more accessible to Western ears. In other words, this isn't Indian music, it's really World Music. When it came to the sounds of India, Hart's focus was on rhythm; the tablas are the main vehicle. 'Razooli' sounds like it could be an outtake from the Grateful Dead's "Blues for Allah." 'Sweet Sixteen' is so sugary, it's difficult not to describe it as 'World Pop.' Jerry Garcia plays 'Happiness Is Drumming' as if it were a prototype version of 'Fire on the Mountain.' In terms of rhythm, 'Magnificent Sevens' is the most accomplished composition. The song showcases the group's improvisation within the Diga Rhythm Band's most challenging arrangement. As a drum album, the percussion is stellar thanks in part to Zakir Hussain's nimble hands. Easy to listen to, "Diga" delivers Indian infused World Music.

1. Sweet Sixteen
2. Magnificent Sevens
3. Happiness Is Drumming
4. Razooli
5. Tal Mala

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Shahid Parvez, Kumar Bose - Synergy

Posted By MiOd On 7:57 AM 0 comments
Shahid Parvez is one of the more celebrated sitar players in the scene of Indian Classical Music today. He belongs to the Etawah Gharana and belongs to an illustrious musical family.
Now in his 50s and one of the leading sitar players of his generation, Ustad Shahid Parvez was a child prodigy who began receiving instruction from his father in singing and tablas at the age of three, and sitar at the age of four. His style has been influenced by his father’s cousin, famous musician Ustad Vilayat Khan.

Indian classical music is a performing art thriving on spontaneous improvisation of the highest level. Encouraged and inspired by a knowledgeable audience a master musician is able to dig deep into the well of their creative resources. A live concert atmosphere with listeners yearning for quality music is the ideal platform for an artist at the peak of their performance, and the 2002 Saptak Festival provided the perfect environment for Shahid Parvez to demonstrate why he is now regarded as one of India's greatest sitarists.
Shahid Parvez belongs to one of the legendary musical dynasties of the Indian sub-continent; he represents the seventh generation of sitar players, in a family having produced a long line of virtuosos, including his uncle Ustad Vilayat Khan.

As well as ably representing these traditions, he has successfully carved out his own unique style of playing. His playing expresses soulfulness, born out of the vocal style associated with his family, combined with a dynamic virtuosity which has the capacity to produce seemingly endless passages of stunning improvisation. His music has earned him genuine respect amongst fellow musicians and great popularity amongst world audiences.

Regarded as a child prodigy, he has been a regular performer since the tender age of eight years. His father, composer Ustad Aziz Khan, first introduced him to music through the tabla, universally regarded as the most sophisticated percussion instrument in the world. A successful Indian musician has to be at least familiar with the rhythmic concepts of tabla, and many of the best musicians have spent years practicing it.

This performance has brought him together with tabla master Kumar Bose, one of the most established exponents of the Benares school of playing, and a disciple of the legendary Pandit Kishan Maharaj. He has regularly accompanied all the great names of Indian music including Ravi Shankar, Nikhil Bannerjee and Hariprasad Chaurasia.

In this performance Shahid Parvez has chosen to play the evening melody, Raga Jog, popular with musicians only in the last fifty years, relatively recent by Indian music standards.

The first CD features the traditional introductory 'alap', a slow meditative elaboration of the main notes and phrases of the particular raga. Through the alap, the devotional mood of the raga is established, played in a free style without rhythmic accompaniment. Gradually a pulse is introduced; between the short phrases you can hear the strumming of the drone (chikari) strings which also serve to keep the soloist rooted to a tonal base note. At the conclusion of the alap, a composition is introduced. It is set to a rarely performed rhythmic cycle of eleven beats named Rudratal, which offers a musical challenge to both soloist and accompanist. Conceptually, the musicians may divide the cycle (e.g. 4.4.3); in this composition the leading melodic phrase (mukra) begins on the ninth beat. Throughout the recital the two players skilfully exchange musical ideas.

Raga Jog continues on CD 2 with three further compositions, two in the sixteen beats cycle of teental (tracks 1&3) and one in the twelve beats ektaal (track 2). The improvisations become faster and more intense, seemingly exploring every aspect of the melodic and rhythmic framework.

Raga Pilu is regarded as a light classical music raga associated with the romantic song style of thumri. It uses all the twelve notes of the octave and offers its' own challenges to the soloist. After concluding the alap (track 4), two compositions (5,6) are presented in a style which gives us an opportunity to experience further glimpses of Shahid Parvez's musical genius.

Recording information: Saptak Festival.

Disc 1:
1. Raga Jog - Alap 1
2. Raga Jog - Jor, Jhalla
3. Raga Jog - Gat (composition in Rudratal)

Disc 2:
1. Raga Jog - Gat in teental
2. Raga Jog - Gat in ektaal
3. Raga Jog - Gat in fast teental
4. Raga Pilu - Alap
5. Raga Pilu - Thumri in deepchandi
6. Raga Pilu - Gat in teental

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Soul of the Sufi

Posted By MiOd On 12:04 AM 0 comments
Fareed Ayaz, Abu Muhammad & Bros.
Soul of the Sufi. Live in Warsaw, 2009
Ghulam Fareed-ud-din Ayaz & Abu Muhammad Qawwal belong to the best known gharana of Qawwali, namely: 'Qawwal Bachon ka Gharana' of Delhi which is approximately 705 years old. Presently both Ghulam Fareed-ud-din Ayaz & Abu Muhammad Qawwal and party are acclaimed nationally and internationally as one of the best exponents of Qawwali in the sub-continent. The brothers started training in classical music at a tender age under the rigorous and critical tutelage of their late father Ustad Munshi Razi-ud-din, who himself was an outstanding classical musician and a recipient of the President of Pakistan’s Pride of Performance medal and many other National honors.
Both brothers are accomplished musicians in the genre of classical music and also in the traditional classical raags such as dhrupad, khayal, tarana, thumri and dadra which they blend beautifully into their Qawwali performances.
They have been performing professionally for the last 30 years, not only in Pakistan but as cultural representatives of Pakistan at international events in Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium Bulgaria, Croatia, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Iran, India, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Morocco, Nepal, Poland, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, Turkey, United Kingdom, U.S.A., U.A.E., Zimbabwe and in many other countries.
Both brothers are well-versed in several languages and can ably perform in Urdu, Sindhi, Punjabi, Pushto, Hindi, Poorbi, Bangle Marathi, Persian, Arabic and Turkish, in addition to Japanese.

1. Introduction
2. Man Kunto Maula
3. Allah Hoo
4. Mere Baney Ki Baat Na Pucho
5. Har Lehza
6. Khawaja Piya
7. Tarana
8. Dam-a-Dam Mast Qalandar
9. Rang

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The Best Traditional Music in China (6): Music of the Qin

Posted By MiOd On 11:15 PM 0 comments
The Best Traditional Music in China (1):Music of the Erhu and the Bowed Stringed Instruments
The Best Traditional Music in China (2):Music of the Guanzi
The Best Traditional Music in China (3): Music of the Guzheng
The Best Traditional Music in China (4): Music of the Minority Peoples
The Best Traditional Music in China (5): Music of the Piba
The Best Traditional Music in China
Music of the Qin
Liu Shui

1. Yang Guan San Die
2. Liu Shui
3. Guang Ling San
4. Qiao Ge
5. Yu Ge
6. Jie Shi Diao-You Lan

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Yarkin - Hayy: Featuring Sufi Vocal Masters

Posted By MiOd On 5:57 PM 0 comments
Daha evvel “Ten”, “Ten’Tende” ve “Kervansaray” albümleri Kalan Müzik tarafından yayınlanan Yarkın Ritm Grubu’ndan Fahrettin ve Ferruh Yarkın kardeşlerin yeni albümleri “HAYY”, Sufi ses ustalarının da katılımıyla kaydedilmiş bir ilahi çalışması. Albümde, Segah, Uşşak ve Hicaz makamlarında birbiri ardına sıralanmış ilahiler, Bilal Demiryürek, Ahmet Şahin, Mehmet Kemiksiz, İlhan Yazıcı, Hamdi Demirci, Osman Ziyagil, Osman Erkahveci tarafından seslendiriliyor. Fahrettin ve Ferruh Yarkın kardeşler tarafından düzenlenen ilahiler, Yavuz Akalın (ney), Derya Türkan (kemençe), Gökhan Filizman (tanbur), Uğur Işık (viyolonsel), Ferruh Yarkın (kanun, perküsyon) ve Fahrettin Yarkın’ın (perküsyon) eşliğinde icra ediliyor. “HAYY”, klasik Türk müziği meraklılarının yanı sıra, dinamik bir ilahi albümü dinlemek isteyen müzik tutkunları için de vazgeçilmeyecek bir albüm.

01. Salat-ı Ümmiye
02. Dervişlik Baştadır Tacda Değil
03. Ey Allahım Beni Senden Ayırma
04. Bülbül Kasidesi
05. Serveri Ser Bülendimiz
06. Tanbur Taksimi: Gökhan Filizman
07. Buyruğun Tut
08. Nice Bir Uyursun Uyanmazsın
09. Mail Oldum Bahçesinde Hurmaya
10. Dağlarile Taşlar ile
11. Mest ü Hayranım
12. Nuri Cemalin
13. Ey Aşikan
14. Ney Taksimi: Yavuz Akalın
15. Dün Gece Seyrim İçinde
16. Neyleyeyim Dünyayı
17. Durmaz Lisanım
18. Dü Cihanı Mefharı
19. Bağrımdaki Biten Başlar
20. Hakkın Habibinin Sevgili Dostu
21. Seyrimde Bir Şehre Vardım
22. Severim Ben Seni
23. Allah Allah hu ve Rabbuna

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Odem

Posted By MiOd On 5:42 AM 0 comments
Wolfgang Puschnig,
Jatinder Thakur,
Dhafer Youssef
Austrian reed man Wolfgang Puschnig, Tunisian oud player and vocalist Dhafer Youssef, and Indian tabla master Jatinder Thakur met in Puschnig's home base of Vienna at the beginning of the '90s, but they did not record as a trio until last year. These three tracks with special guests were recorded in 1997 and have just been released. Odem, their debut, is an intimate and relaxed meeting of three distinct musical languages that find a convincing common ground.
Odem is also a showcase for Puschnig and Youssef's versatility as players. Puschnig is one of the founding members of the Vienna Art Orchestra and a main soloist in Carla Bley's bands, but he also feels at home in funky duets with bass guitarist Jamaaladeen Tacuma and his collaboration with the Korean percussion ensemble SamulNori. Youssef's music is rooted in the Sufi tradition, but he is open to many musical ideas, and lately he has brought the oud into much more electric environments through his collaborations with Norwegian guitarist Eivind Aarset, trumpeter Arve Hendriksen, and keyboard player Bugge Wesseltoft. Thakur, who played on Youssef's first two discs (Malak, Enja, 1999; Electric Sufi, Enja, 2002), comes from a lineage of tabla players and is associated with great sarod player Ali Akbar Khan's college of music.
The opening "Promise," written by Youssef, displays his skill at composing simple and catchy sentences and Puschnig's ease at ornamenting these sentences with bluesy phrasing. "Armenian Longing" and "Soul Rewind" are arresting duets between Youssef's devotional and fragile vocals and the gentle sax playing of Puschnig, and they are the most beautiful tracks here. "Strained Ties" is based on an Middle Eastern scale; Puschnig improvises on his flute as if it was an Indian bamboo flute, the bansuri.
Some of the collaborations with the special guests are not as successful as the trio playing. The ceremonial "Hanullim Project" with Korean percussionist and vocalist Lee Kwang Soo and the better realized, peaceful reading of "Worlds Apart" by Puschnig's wife, singer Linda Sharrock, push Youssef aside, focusing on Puschnig's masterful flute playing. But the last track, the Youssef-penned "Boushouisha," with Armenian percussionist Arto Tuncboyacian and bassist Achim Tang, is a festive conclusion to this cosmopolitan, open-minded meeting that ends with Youssef's

1 Promise
2 Armenian Longing
3 Hochzeit Zu Dritt
4 Faithful
5 Hanullim Project ( Bass - Helene Labarriere, Drums [Korean Tschang'go], Vocals - Lee Kwang Soo)
6 Worlds Apart ( Bass - Achim Tang, Percussion - Arto Tuncboyacian, Vocals - Linda Sharrock)
7 Soul Rewind
8 Meditation Theory
9 Strained Ties
10 Boushouisha ( Bass - Achim Tang, Percussion - Arto Tuncboyacian)

Flute, Flute [Alto], Saxophone [Alto] - Wolfgang Puschnig
Oud, Vocals - Dhafer Youssef
Tabla, Percussion - Jatinder Thakur

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Tejendra Narayan Majumdar - Raga Ahiri

Posted By MiOd On 2:27 AM 0 comments
Tejendra Narayan Majumdar has created a superb body of recordings since his emergence in the early '80s as one of the new generation of Indian classical musicians. Since that time, he has become one of the top performers on the sarod in this genre of music. Like many other classical Indian musicians, he began to study quite early in life. His first teacher was his grandfather and when he wore the old man out then his father took over. But the strongest of educational relationships was forged when he began studying with acknowledged sarod master Ustad Bahadur Khan, the nephew of Indian musical genius Alauddin Khan. Majumdar studied with Khan for 18 years, during which time he grabbed first place in the All India Radio competition in 1981. Further honors included a presidential gold medal. When his teacher died in 1989, Majumdar continued his studies with Ajay Sinha Roy, and then was accepted as a disciple by one of the great Indian instrumentalists, Ustad Ali Akbar Khan, with whom he has continued to study. Majumdar performs in his repertoire a combination of pieces from the dhrupad, tantrakari, and gayaki styles of music. He has performed at most of the major concert venues, as well as touring in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. His New York debut took place along with sitarist Manilal Nag in 1994 in a program at the New School. Majumdar works with many first class tabla players accompanying him, among them Pandit Kishan Maharah, Sankar Ghosh, Pandit Swqapan Chaudbury, Anindo Chatterjee, and Ustad Zakir Hussain. Critics are usually thrilled with Majumdar's performances; he has even been compared to Beethoven. ~ Eugene Chadbourne, Rovi

1. Raga Ahiri - Alap, Jor & Jhala
2. Raga Ahiri - Vilambit Gat In Tintal
3. Raga Ahiri - Drut Gat In Tintal
4. Raga Bhairavi - Dhun In Dadra Tal

Tejendra Narayan Majumdar (Sarod)
Tanmoy Bose (Tabla)

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Bhajan Sopori - Raga Kirwani

Posted By MiOd On 11:17 PM 0 comments
Bhajan Sopori is an Indian santoor player who hails from Sopore in Kashmir Valley and traces his lineage from ancient Santoor experts. He was awarded the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award in 1993 and the Padma Shri in 2004. In 2009 he was honoured with the prestigious Baba Allaudin Khan Award

1. Kirwani - Alap, Jor, Jhala (Santoor)
2. Kirwani - Gats In Slow, Fast Teental (Santoor & Tabla)

Pt. Bhajan Sopori - Santoor
Bhushan Sopori - Tabla

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Devotional Songs from North India

Posted By MiOd On 4:47 PM 0 comments
Premkumar Mallik
In Praise of the Goddess
Devotional Songs from North India, 2006
In no other living religious tradition of the world is the veneration of goddesses - or rather, different aspects of the mother goddess - as important as in India. Since its earliest beginning, a major part of the Indian pantheon consists of females who play a special role in transmitting values which cannot be reciprocated by their male counterparts, reaching from graceful and nourishing aspects to the darker and more dangerous realms of the human psyche. The Mallik family - founded by the saintly singers Rashakrishna and Kartaram in the second half of the 18th century - has an unbroken history of venerating the mother goddess in all her different aspects. The songs featured on this CD - examples of a vast body of compositions transmitted in the family - provide ample proof of this long-lasting tradition.
The collection of songs on this CD is centered on Durga, the most venerated goddess in the Hindu Pantheon. She is regarded as the Shakti, the essence and counterpart of all the male divinities. When the buffalo demon Mahisasura threatened to destroy the world, Durga was born from the fire emanating from the mouths of the gods. Due to her slaying of the demon which earned her the title of Mahisasuramardani, she is regarded as the saviour of the universe. All other aspects of the primeval mother goddess are born from her. Usually she is represented surrounded by Karttikeya, the god of war, Ganesha, the lord over all obstacles, Saraswati, the goddess of music and learning, and Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. Her festival, the Durga Puja, is celebrated all over India for nine days during autumn in the month of Ashvin.
This recording, and Goddess: Divine Energy (13266-2) were inspired by and produced for GODDESS: divine energy - A major exhibition exploring the myriad imaginative expressions of divine female power in the art of India and the Himalayas at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney (13 October 2006 - January 2007) in cooperation with Radio Berlin Brandenburg (RBB), Berlin Germany.

The Mallik family’s musical history starts with the two brothers Radhakrishna and Kartaram who arrived at the court of Darbhanga in what is nowadays Northern Bihar, close to the Nepalese border, around 1775. The Mallik’s, one of only two families who have managed to keep alive dhrupad, the most ancient and austere style of North Indian music, are famous for their unique, very rhythmically accentuated style of dhrupad singing and their rich repertory of compositions, including rags which are sung exclusively by their own family.
They have toured Europe and the United States and thanks to a new generation of curious listeners and the growing interest of contemporary composers who were fascinated by the subtleties of intonation, dhrupad came back into the concert halls. Their particular skills have made the family famous among Western scholars and lovers of North Indian vocal music. Not wanting to distinguish between 'higher' and 'lower' styles, as they did not want to differentiate between richer and poorer patrons of their art, they performed with equal willingness and grace in the biggest concert halls and in the most modest temple or private house when they felt their music was received with love, singing dhrupad and all the other styles of North Indian music - khyal, tarana, thumri and bhajan, the musical forms you can hear on this CD - with equal competence and ease.
Premkumar, the youngest son, teaches vocal music at the University of Allahabad. Prem, the first part of his name, means 'love'; Kumar is a title given to a person of noble descent.

1. Rag Durga - Chota Khyal in Drut Ektal
2. Rag Gurjari Todi - Vilambit Ektal & Chota Khyal in Drut Teental
3. Rag Bilaskhani Todi - Chota Khyal in Madhyalaya Teental
4. Rag Adana - Sultal
5. Rag Bhairavi - Bhajan in Jhaptal

Premkumar Mallik - Voice, Harmonium, Tabla
Prashant Mallik - Voice
Nishant Mallik - Voice
Priyanka Mallik - Voice & Tanpura
Ravishankar Upadhyaya - Tabla & Pakhawaj
Rashmi Mallik - Tanpura

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Ali Akbar Khan - Passing on the Tradition

Posted By MiOd On 11:49 AM 0 comments
By the mid 1990s, Ali Akbar Khan's public perfomances in the San Francisco Bay Area had grown from intimate venues to large auditoriums, and he performed often. This live recording is from one such occasion in May 1995. The first raga on the album is a late evening mode, Marwa. [George Harrison used this scale in his "Marwa Blues".] There are only 6 notes to the scale, both ascending and descending. On the sarod, it is difficult to play, since two open strings must not sound and care must be taken in improvisation lest phrases may sound "off" and the emotional level of the piece may be broken. But to provide musical interest and value, risks must be taken and, here, Ali Akbar Khan meets the challenge, as we expect from the great master. Listening closely to the raga, we can hear him skirt disaster. Marwa is restricted to the alap, the first, rhythm-free section. When the tabla of Swapan Chaudhuri enters, Khan shifts to the combined raga Puriya Kalyan. The mood also changes from heroic devotion to joyful peace.

The title of the album, Passing on Tradition, refers to the guru-student lineage of a musical style from the 16th century emperor's court musician; eventually to Mohammed Wazir Khan; to Ali Akbar Khan's father Allaudin Khan; to Ali Akbar Khan, Khan's sister Annapurna Devi, and also to Ravi Shankar; and then to Khan's own sons, Aahish Khan and Alam Khan. Receiving a Grammy nomination, this album presents the school's style in fine fashion.

1. Introduction
2. Rawa Marwa
3. Raga Puriya Kalyan, Gat in Tin

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Shivkumar Sharma - Enchanting Moments

Posted By MiOd On 6:36 AM 0 comments
Pandit Shivkumar Sharma is an exceptionally gifted musician.He is a complete artist, having had his training in vocal, percussion and instrumental music, from none other than his father, Pandit Umadutt Sharma, a distinguished State Musician of Jammu and Kashmir.

However, it was the father's express desire that Shivkumar should dedicate himself to popularizing the Santoor. Pandit Shivkumar Sharma has not only elevated this folk instrument of Kashmir to the concert hall status but the Santoor has taken its place in the concert halls around the world. With a style evolved out of gayaki (vocal), gatkari (instrumental technique) and layakari (rhythmic improvisation) Shivkumar imparts to his santoor recitals a multidimentional appeal.

Shivkumar Sharma was born in Jammu, in the state of Kashmir, on 13th January 1938. After training as a vocalist from the age of five followed by further training in percussion through the Tabla, he took on other instruments, such as the Sarod, Violin and the Harmonium. At the age of fourteen, he was introduced to the Santoor by his father, an instrument on which the latter had done considerable amount of research.

Pandit Sharma grappled with many problems presented by the Santoor and adapted the instrument to overcome comments of many critics that, unlike sitar or sarod, santoor was not capable of mimicking vocal techniques. He achieved this by increasing the number of bridges to get a wider range of octaves, and changed the system of tuning and the structural configuration of the strings to allow for more precision on note reproduction.

Shivkumar Sharma gave his first public performance in Bombay in 1955. He recorded his first solo album in 1960. In 1967, he teamed up with the Bamboo Flute Maestro, Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia and the Slide Guitarist, Pandit Brij Bhushan Kabra, to produce a thematic album "The Call of the Valley" , easily one of the greatest hits in the field of Indian Classical Music.

RAGA BIHAG
Alaap, Jod, Jhala, Gat set to vilambit Jhgaptaal & Drut Teentaal

1. Allap,Job,Jhala
2. Gat Set To Vilambit Jhaptaal
3. Gats Set To Drut Teentaal

This CD features Pundit Shivkumar Sharma who is accompanied by Ustad Shafaat Ahmed Khan on Tabla and Satish Vyas on Tanpura.

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Lisbeth Scott - Passionate Voice

Posted By MiOd On 1:49 AM 0 comments
Lisbeth Scott originally started her musical career as a classical pianist, and, fortunately for all of us, has changed his way and began vocal studies. Her voice was in the hundreds of films, including Shrek and Sinbad, The Passion of The Christ, in addition to numerous television shows, including Touched By An Angel, ER, and Boston Public. Her vocals can be compared to Enya, Sinead O'Connor and Dido, but it certainly has its own distinct and vivid style.

(01). Reveal
(02). To Love and Be Loved
(03). Give
(04). All of These Years
(05). Grace
(06). Surrender
(07). No One But You
(08). Stones
(09). Passionate Voice
(10). Reveal (Reprise)

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Curro Piñana - Saetas

Posted By MiOd On 7:15 PM 0 comments
Curro Piñana
Saetas, 2003
El joven maestro del cante flamenco, Curro Piñana, sorprende con una grabación completamente dedicada a los distintos estilos de saetas. Con la colaboración de de los guitarristas Carlos Piñana y Antonio Piñana y la Banda de la Infantería de Marina del Tercio de Levante de Cartagena.

(01). Saeta de Introducción
(02). Saeta Marchernera
(03). Virgen de la Amargura
(04). Saeta para la coronación de la Viergen de los Dolores de Puerto Lumbreras
(05). Cristo de los Mineros/Marcha Mektub (Mariano San Miguel)
(06). Debla
(07). Virgen de la Piedad
(08). Arboleas
(09). Descendcimiento
(10). Saeta al Nazareno /Marcha de Nuestro Padre Jesús (Emilio Cebrián)
(11). Saeta al Cristo de la Sangre del barrio de San Cristóbal de Lorca
(12). Saetas Cueartelera y Pasión
(13). Yacente
(14). Cristo de los Toreros

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Les Colombes – Traversée

Posted By MiOd On 4:57 PM 0 comments
El Hmaïem EL Bidh (Les Colombes) est un Collectif de Recherche et Essai en Musique qui a été créé en Tunisie en 1980, est formé actuellement quatre membres instrumentistes et chanteurs, enseignants à l'école, au lycée et à l'université :
Zakaria au Violon, Ammar au Naï, Hached au Aoud et Elyès au Colombri et à la Guitare.
Les Colombes se situent dans le cadre d'une vision de la musique et de la chanson qui se veut expressive de l'état de l'homme dans son entière réalité : «une musique universelle qui jaillit des entrailles ».
Le groupe a commencé par mettre en musique de la poésie contemporaine en langue arabe, tirée entre autre des œuvres des poètes Mahmoud Darouich et Samih El Kacem (Palestine), Mokhtar Loghmani, Adem Fethi et Souf Abid (Tunisie), Pablo Neruda (Chili), ce qui l’a mené à donner des représentations dans le cadre des activités culturelles des maisons de culture et des festivals régionaux. A partir de 1985, le groupe étend son travail au langage musical instrumental. Cette nouvelle option s’est trouvée par sa forme très proche du théâtre, ce qui a abouti à une collaboration avec le monde du théâtre et du cinéma.
El Hmaïem EL Bidh s'est vu décerner le Grand Prix du Jury à la première édition du Concours Découvertes Tunisie 21 organisé à El Jem en Tunisie en 1999. Ce groupe a effectué sa première tournée à l’étranger (France) en Juillet 2000 (ouverture de la 5ème édition du festival des Suds à Arles, Musiques du monde à Romans).

1. Aladin, le rêve علاء الدين الحلم
2. De l’ennui à l’extase لذة القلق
3. Cri de soif, soif de vivre صرخة العطش
4. Le vieux toujours jeunes الشيخ الصغير
5. Le combat corps à corps العركة
6. Traversée عبور

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Fiorella Mannoia

Posted By MiOd On 4:02 PM 0 comments
Italian pop star Fiorella Mannoia started getting involved in show business while participating in a movie called Non Cantare, Spara! at the age of 13. She recorded her first single in 1969. Mannoia's debut album, Mannoia Foresi & Co, was released by RCA in 1972. She made her first appearance at the prestigious San Remo's Festival in 1981, singing "Cafe Nero Bollente." Mannoia returned to that same event in 1984 with "Come Si Cambia." A year later, Momento Delicado was released by Ariston, followed by a self-titled record in 1986 and Di Terra E Di Vento in 1989, featuring Chico Buarque's classic "Oh Che Sara." In 1994, Fiorella Mannoia teamed up with Brazilian singer/songwriter Caetano Veloso, recording "Il Culo del Mondo.

(01). Caffe Nero Bollente
(02). E Muoviti Un Po
(03). Non Si Possono Correre Ri
(04). Ma Sara Vero
(05). Canzone Leggerissima
(06). Dimmi Di No
(07). Torneranno Gli Angeli
(08). L' Altra Faccia Della Lun
(09). Bella Gioventu
(10). Atlantide Non Vedro
(11). Il Posto Delle Viole
(12). Canto Contro

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Shivkumar Sharma - Twilight Melodies On The Santoor

Posted By MiOd On 1:47 AM 0 comments
Pandit Shivkumar Sharma is an exceptionally gifted musician.He is a complete artist, having had his training in vocal, percussion and instrumental music, from none other than his father, Pandit Umadutt Sharma, a distinguished State Musician of Jammu and Kashmir.

However, it was the father's express desire that Shivkumar should dedicate himself to popularizing the Santoor. Pandit Shivkumar Sharma has not only elevated this folk instrument of Kashmir to the concert hall status but the Santoor has taken its place in the concert halls around the world. With a style evolved out of gayaki (vocal), gatkari (instrumental technique) and layakari (rhythmic improvisation) Shivkumar imparts to his santoor recitals a multidimentional appeal.

Shivkumar Sharma was born in Jammu, in the state of Kashmir, on 13th January 1938. After training as a vocalist from the age of five followed by further training in percussion through the Tabla, he took on other instruments, such as the Sarod, Violin and the Harmonium. At the age of fourteen, he was introduced to the Santoor by his father, an instrument on which the latter had done considerable amount of research.

Pandit Sharma grappled with many problems presented by the Santoor and adapted the instrument to overcome comments of many critics that, unlike sitar or sarod, santoor was not capable of mimicking vocal techniques. He achieved this by increasing the number of bridges to get a wider range of octaves, and changed the system of tuning and the structural configuration of the strings to allow for more precision on note reproduction.

Shivkumar Sharma gave his first public performance in Bombay in 1955. He recorded his first solo album in 1960. In 1967, he teamed up with the Bamboo Flute Maestro, Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia and the Slide Guitarist, Pandit Brij Bhushan Kabra, to produce a thematic album "The Call of the Valley" , easily one of the greatest hits in the field of Indian Classical Music.

Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma
With
Shafaat Ahmed Khan - Tabla
Satish Vyas - Tanpura

RAGA: LALIT

Alap-Jod - Jhala & Gats Roopak Taal & Teentaal

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The Best Traditional Music in China (5): Music of the Piba

Posted By MiOd On 11:50 PM 0 comments
The Best Traditional Music in China (1):Music of the Erhu and the Bowed Stringed Instruments
The Best Traditional Music in China (2):Music of the Guanzi
The Best Traditional Music in China (3): Music of the Guzheng
The Best Traditional Music in China (4): Music of the Minority Peoples
The Best Traditional Music in China
Music of the Piba
Han Ya Xi Shui
Track Listings
--------------
(01). Han Ya Xi Shui
(02). Yue Er Gao
(03). Yu Er Xi Shui
(04). Que Yu Hui Chao
(05). Qing Ting Dian Shui
(06). Han Que Zheng Mei
(07). Hou Xiao Yin Qiang
(08). Shi Zi Gun Xiu Qiu
(09). Fei Hua Dian Cui
(10). Ge Wu Yi
(11). Sai Shang Qun
(12). Han Gong Qiu Yue
(13). Zhao Jun Chu Sai
(14). Ping Sha Luo Yan
(15). Hai Qing Na Tian E
(16). Jin Feng Li

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Cheikha Rimitti - Nouar

Posted By MiOd On 8:22 PM 0 comments
Cheikha Rimitti
Nouar, 1999
Most of Cheikha Rimitti's albums have framed her voice with only throbbing Algerian hand percussion and the breathy, wooden tones of the ney flute, but Nouar expands and adorns the godmother of rai's traditional, spare arrangements in low-key ways.

(01). Nouar 6:17
(02). Nakhla 6:16
(03). Hak Hak 6:45
(04). Saïda 6:51
(05). Mani Man 6:14
(06). Koum Oula Talag 6:07
(07). Ouah Ya Ould Bladi 5:13
(08). Osman 4:34
(09). Khalouhom 5:30
(10). Rassoul Allah 5:41

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Zarin Daruwala - Ornate Strings - Sarod

Posted By MiOd On 7:40 PM 0 comments
Vidushi zareen daruwala born in 1946 was a child prodigy and is a celebrated sarod player of India.she was trained by several eminent musicians like pt.haripad ghosh,pt.bhishamdev vedi,pt.laxman prasad jasperware,pt.v.g.jog and pt.ratanjankar.she became zareen sharma after she married the famous sitarist Pt.ashok sharma.a musician of the top order she received several honours including sangeet natak academy award and dada saheb phalke award.she represents agra gharana.movie made by purnabhat

1. Malkauns- Alap, Jod, Jhala, Vil. Jhaptaal, Drut Teental
2. Kafi- Tappa- Adhha Taal
3. Gavti- Rupak, Teental
4. Bhairavi-Sagar- Alap, Teentaal

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Istanbul Strings - 12 Songs Instrumental Music

Posted By MiOd On 3:23 PM 0 comments
Istanbul Strings are first Violin Group in Turkey and consisting of a master of musician 11 supervisor. The album which is a successful production with the wonderful 12 comments on your face ...

(01). İstanbul Strings
(02). W.A. Mozart / Küçük Bir Gece Müziği
(03). Gözyaşı
(04). Çılgın
(05). Hamare Baad
(06). Sarı Gelin / feat. Mustafa Ceceli
(07). Dubaistanbul
(08). Her Gün İsyanım Var Kadere / feat. Hüsnü Şenlendirici
(09). GipsyStrings
(10). Hicazkar Saz Eseri
(11). Sarı Gelin
(12). Hicazkar Saz Eseri (Remix)

MP3 320 kbps, 2010

HERE

Pandit Shivkumar Sharma - Raga Bhoopali

Posted By MiOd On 5:30 AM 0 comments
Good music for the typical Indian Classical Music Lover. Delighfully simple yet astounding at the same time. Would recommend it to anyone who likes easy listening.
Bhoopali is an ancient and a very popular Indian classical raga that has peace and devotion as its essence. It is usually played in the evening or early nights. This raga is used by the classical as well as popular/film musicians, very frequently.
This is a live recording where Santoor pioneer Shivkumar Sharma is accompanied by the tabla maestro Zakir Hussain. Their combination is something ecstatic. The quality of recording is excellent too. The open-stringed nature of Santoor gives a very magical touch to Rag Bhoopali, especially the crescendo created during the Jod phase and in the fast tempo Tarana played in Ek Taal.

I have heard that musicians always prefer to play the music to live audiences, rather than recording in the confines of a studio. This album is an excellent example of the freedom, space, and the inspiration enjoyed by the musicians in a live concert set-up. The tabla accompaniment is superlative and stands as an example for the rapport that these two great musicians have developed between them.

For those who enjoy elaborate rendition of classical music, this album is a must. There was a time when I had this music loaded into my car for more than six months and it was my daily routine to listen to this music while driving. Every time, it was a refreshing experience and it had a very soothing effect on my mind.

I consider this album as one of the top five classical albums rendered by the great maestro Shivkumar Sharma.
HPR

1. Alap - Shiv Kumar Sharma
2. Gat Part I - Shiv Kumar Sharma
3. Gat Part II - Shiv Kumar Sharma

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Canê - Vegere. Reviens

Posted By MiOd On 1:39 AM 0 comments
Canê
Vegere. Reviens, 2006
Track Listings
--------------
(01). Bilbil (Le Rossignol)
(02). Efrin
(03). Miho
(04). Hoy Yarê (La Bien-Aimée)
(05). Delal
(06). Vegere (Reviens)
(07). Sukraye
(08). Rengê Min (Ma Couleur)
(09). Lê Lê Bêmal (Ô La Vagabonde !)
(10). Yar Wezo
(11). Yar Koçerê (Belle Nomade)

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The Soundscapes Collection

Posted By MiOd On 1:14 AM 0 comments
A collection of 5 mini CDs showcasing the essence of the Platinum bestselling 'Soundscapes' series which presented legends such as Shiv Kumar Sharma, Hari Prasad Chaurasia and Zakir Hussain. This compilation featuring soundscapes Mountains, Soundscapes Deserts, Soundscapes Valley, Soundscapes River and Soundscapes Seas is a unique must have collection.

Soundscapes Mountains,
Shivkumar Sharma

1. Himalayan Dawn
2. Echoes From The Valley
3. Mountains Love Song
4. Twilight Shadows

Soundscapes Deserts,
Zakir Hussain

1. The Great Indian Desert
2. Sandstorm
3. Nomads

Soundscapes Valley,
Shivkumar Sharma, Hariprasad Chaurasia

1. Call Of The Valley
2. Whispering Winds
3. Flirtation
4. Twilight Zone

Soundscapes River,
Hariprasad Chaurasia

1. Water Poem
2. Song Of The River
3. Delta

Soundscapes Seas.
Bhaskar Chandavarkar

1. Fishermans Dawn
2. Surging Seas
3. Goa Polka
4. Eastern Thunder

Shiv Kumar Sharma, Zakir Hussain, Hari Prasad Chaurasia, Bhaskar Chandavarkar.

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The Virtuoso of the Veena [Music of South India]

Posted By MiOd On 11:25 AM 0 comments
The Virtuoso of the Veena [Music of South India]
S. Balachander
Balachander is one of the larger names in the history of semi-contemporary South Indian classical music, originally playing on a North Indian sitar no less. Here he plays "Ragam Chakravaakam" in a more or less improvised manner (though all Indian classical is more or less improvised, on this recording the ragam itself hadn't been set until Balachander started plucking the veena). What one will notice when listening to the album is first the alap, in which Balachander brings new levels to the techniques of stretching a note from the instrument and wrenching each nuance of the string from a single note. Once the rhythmic accompaniment is added in the ragam proper, another round of the virtuosity of the instrument is showcased, along with a mridangam (a likely predecessor to the North Indian tabla) and a gatam (an earthenware pot drum). While the ornamentation may be somewhat less than a South Indian violin concert, that may be at least in part due to the instruments themselves. The veena is a somewhat drier sounding instrument, plucked much like the sitar, but generally somewhat slower and more formalized. Balachander is in fact a virtuoso of the instrument, though more exciting players are out there on recordings, such as perhaps Zia Moiuddin Dager on the rudra vina. Pick up the album if you're a fan of the South Indian concert style, though if it's excitement in the music that you're looking for, look up either Zia Moiuddin Dagar or maybe even go north to some of Ravi Shankar's recordings. Another possibility would be the South Indian violin of L Subramaniam.

1. Aalaapana and Thaanam
2. Roopakam Taalam

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Ustad Imrat Khan - Lalita

Posted By MiOd On 7:56 AM 0 comments
The great Imrat Khan is one of the last living masters of this bass sitar, and this solo performance is devoted to his specialty, 'Alap' and 'Jor and Jhala' played on surbahar on raga 'Lalit'. For nearly an hour he patiently unfolds this early morning raga note by note to a stirring climax.
Lalita is a fifty some minutes rendition of the Late night Raga Lalit, normally performed between 4 a.m. and Dawn. It's a very elusive, almost unwieldy Raga; It's ragamala representation is that of a lover, leaving his mistress in the first light of dawn, trying not to wake her. If you are looking for a deeply sensual, yet at the same time mystical mood, this version of Lalit will be an excellent choice.

Ustad Imrat Khan, seniormost exponent of the Imdadkhani Gharana
(tradition) gives an awesome and adept version of Lalit on the
Surbahar (bass-sitar) only, there is but the Alaap, Jhor and Jhalla,
speaking of which it is perhaps the most beautiful Jhor and
Jalla I ever heared in Indian Music. Recorded by the puristic and
dedicated label of Water Lily acoustics, which uses tubegear
to record in a church- this production captures every subtle
vibration and ambiance of the Ustad's heartwrenching playing in a
warm and etheric atmosphere.

Yes, heartwrenching - as this is not your run of the mill 'new age
feel good spacey music, this is very serious and deepfelt devotion
expressed through one of the highest art forms in the world. I cannot
claim to know a lot of versions of Lalit; Hariprasad Chaurasia,
Ram Narayan, Tejendra Majumdar and Shujaat Khan are all landmark
recordings. But this one brings something else to the surface,
something more primal and deep, as if it is played from within the raga...

Lastly, do not be discouraged by the other reviewer's disappointment,
listening to indian music is a very subjective endeavour, dependent
on mood, time of day, quality of your set up, etc. I can't but highly
recommend a recording which does not aim to please, yet is a masterful and very emotional venture into the depths of a very uncanny Raga.

1. Alap
2. Jor And Jhala

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Balaban - Lieder aus Azerbaidjan

Posted By MiOd On 4:12 AM 0 comments
Balaban
Lieder aus Azerbaidjan, 1999
Track Listings
--------------
(01). Vorspiel & Tut agaci (instr.)
(02). Gaytarma
(03). Anzeli hecaz
(04). Alagöz
(05). Kücalara
(06). Sayhani
(07). Tut agaci (vocal)
(08). Gafgazi
(09). Lezginka
(10). Nazli
(11). Anacan
(12). Lezginka
(13). Beri bah

Recorded Live, 1984

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Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Rapture

Posted By MiOd On 3:30 AM 0 comments
In terms of emotion, prowess and mesmeric power, there is no equal to the voice of the legendary qawwali singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. The proof is on this hypnotic collection, 'Rapture' which celebrates and remembers his unique talents.
This collection is yet another masterpiece from the legend who masterminded this form of music on the international scene. Whats best about this collection is that it gives a taste of all the flavours of the music in the armour of this genius artist. And every track gives the universal message of love, from divine love to human love. The first track (Man Atkiya bay-Purwa dai Naal) is a beauty. It is pure qawwali about a careless beloved. It brings out the true feelings of love even if you dont understand a word of the lyrics. The music is so powerful, it is an amazing experience. The next track (Sab Vird karo) reverts to the pop style of Khan (not his true forte) but yet is a beautiful glorification of divine love and the excellent lyrics are too good to be understood. Track 3 (Saanson ki Maala) is a beauty from the start till the end. If u start listening to it, u will never wish it to end. Again pure qawwali but in a different dialect. The music is mystifying. The lyrics are rich. It is immersed in feelings for the beloved. The next track (Tumhain dillagi) is traditional qawwali stuff & is a must listen. The crests & troughs are a wonderful experience. Again it is an invitation towards true love & the sufferings faced in that love. Track 5 (Dam Dam Karo Fareed) is a qawwali in praise of a Soofi saint and his devotion for truth. It is this form of music that qawwali has its actual roots in. The second last track (Ghunghat Chuk) is to be understood to be enjoyed. It is a pure Punjabi qawwali that invites the beloved to break away all the barriers in love. The last track (Un kay Andaz-e-karam) is a qawwali which is not only lyrically rich(which is always true) but the music is also equally rich. Describing the flip of heart on the beloved, it is a perfect ending to this collection. I am sure Nusrat would have loved listening to this collection himself as well!

1. Man Atkeia Beparwah De Naal
2. Sab Vird Karo Allah Allah
3. Sanson Ki Mala Peh Simroon Bhajan
4. Tumhen Dil Lagi Bhool Jani Paregee
5. Dam Dam Karo Fareed
6. Ghunghat Chuk O Sajnan Hun Sharman
7. Un Ka Andaz-E-Karam

192 kbps including Covers

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The Best Traditional Music in China (4): Music of the Minority Peoples

Posted By MiOd On 3:37 PM 0 comments
The Best Traditional Music in China (1):Music of the Erhu and the Bowed Stringed Instruments
The Best Traditional Music in China (2):Music of the Guanzi
The Best Traditional Music in China (3): Music of the Guzheng
The Best Traditional Music in China
Music of the Minority Peoples
Chun Jiang Hua Yue Ye

(01). Chun Jiang Hua Yue Ye
(02). Cao Yuan Qing Ge
(03). Shi Mian Mai Fu
(04). Feng Huang Zhan Chi
(05). Er Quan Ying Yue
(06). Nao Yuan Xiao
(07). Mei Li De Ta Shi Ku Gan
(08). Zhan Tai Feng
(09). Niao Yu Hua Xiang
(10). Chen Xing Yuan He Fan
(11). Huan Le De Yan Bian
(12). Mei Li De Jin Kong Que
(13). Yu Zhou Chang Wan

Flac tracks (EAC Rip): 290 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 150 MB | Covers

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Omar Faruk Tekbilek - Mystical Garden

Posted By MiOd On 10:07 AM 0 comments
Omar Faruk Tekbilek continues to delight Western listeners with a vast array of Middle Eastern musical traditions. As the follow up to his debut solo recording Whirling, Mystical Garden combines Faruk's musical mastery, composition and mystical influences creating a soulful and emotional musical journey. Mystical Garden (and the self-titled track) is a variation on a theme. It is the reflection of Faruk's inspiration by "the unity of the Mystical life. The garden is an island surrounded by the ocean of sincerity. Everyone with their sincere hearts chanting God's name in their language. In essence, we are the flowers owned by the one and only Gardener." Mystical Garden places more emphasis on Faruk's writing, featuring five original tracks. And there is a greater emphasis on the stellar musicianship of the players. Egyptian Dance demonstrates traditional Egyptian motives, with variations on the rhythm and the scales. Hu Allah continues to tell Faruk's story in the garden, with his soulful voice over a bed of chanting, nature sounds, and orchestration, along with oud, ney, and bendir. As the last track, this piece leaves the listener in a peaceful trance. To compare Faruk to Western musicians, it would be as if one musician was a master of the drums, percussion, guitar, flute, recorder, oboe, and more. Add to this Faruk's mystical influences, and the listener is in for an extraordinary experience.

Working with longtime producer-multi-instrumentalist Brine Keane, Omar Faruk Tekbilek creates evocative soundscapes of Middle Eastern origin, both original compositions and arrangements of traditional material. Ney, kavala, zurna, baglama, oud, bendir and cumbus are set in a discreet wash of synthesizer drones and percussion parts performed by five members of his ensemble. The tone is light but spiritual, retaining an affinity to his heritage--but with a nod to contemporary New Age sensibilities, especially in the simple arrangements and occasional use of ambient nature sound effects. However, the strength of musicianship and commitment to tradition assures that Mystical Garden stays firmly rooted in the pastures of Allah and not in the organic flower borders of background music. Tekbilek makes original and uplifting music that consistently rewards the listener. --Derek Rath

(01). Other Side of the River
(02). Magic of the Evening
(03). Laz
(04). Shashkin
(05). Hasret
(06). Egyptian Dance
(07). Three Last Words
(08). Mystical Garden
(09). Hu Allah

Omar Faruk Tekbilek: Ney, Kavala, Zurna, Baglama, Jura, Oud, Darbuka, Bendir, Tambourine, Davul, Finger Cymbals, Synthesizers & Vocals.
Brian Keane: Guitars, Synthesizers, Arrangements, Basses, Percussion, Cymbals & Drums.
Hassan Isikkut: Kanun & Violin.
Arto Tuncboyaciyan: Frame Drums, Shakers, Bells, Bendirs, Zil, Triangle, Guiro, Davul, Water Bowl, Vocals (tracks 1, 3 & 7) & Percussion (track 2).
Ara Dinkjian: Oud & Cumbus (tracks 3, 5 & 7).
Dan Pickering: Flügelhorn (track 1).

The cover illustration is "Autumn Landscape With Mountains And Trees" circa 1370, and attributed to kar-i mani. It is found today in the Topkapi Museum in Instanbul.

FLAC (EAC Rip): 350 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 160 MB | Covers

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Salim Fergani - El Amante Abandonado

Posted By MiOd On 2:04 AM 0 comments
El Amante Abandonado.
L' Amoureux Délaissée.
The Forsaken Lover
Música clásica de la ciudad de Constantina, Argelia
Ensemble, Sheij Salim Fergani, dir.
Cheikh Salim Fergani (Arabic الـشــيــخ ســلـيــم فــرجــانــي) (born 1953 in Constantine, Algeria) is an Algerian oud player and singer. He is a notable performer of maluf music, and has recorded various CDs for the Pneuma label of Eduardo Paniagua. He is the son of the Algerian musician Mohamed Tahar Fergani

Hawzi y Mahjuz
Istikbar: Our two tormented hearts
Hawzi: Do not forsake your loved one
Mahjuz: The inconsolable lover

Suite Rahahoui
Taqsim 'ud and fhal Rahaoui
Taqsim fhal. Love is a torment
Istikbar. You who want to know love
Inklab. Tonight
Khlas. May your hapiness continue

Performers:
Salim Fergani ('ud, voice), Youcef Bounas (djuwàq or fhal, zurna), Nabil Taleb (kemandja), Bachir Gouli (tar), Khaled Smair (darbuka)

FLAC(EAC Rip): 400 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 180 MB | Booklet Scans

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Mongolia - Traditional Music, UNESCO Collection

Posted By MiOd On 11:08 PM 0 comments
Mongolia Music
Though it is not necessary to go all the way to Mongolia to find good Mongol music, for fans of the sounds of Central Asia, it might help. Finding Mongolian music in an American record store is a little like traveling to Mongolia -- a long journey with lots of wandering around. For those unfamiliar with the music, or with this part of the world, here is a brief introduction.

Historically known as Outer Mongolia (to be distinguished from the Chinese autonomous republic of Inner Mongolia) and known for the past 70 years as the People's Republic of Mongolia, now it is simply called Mongolia. The home of Genghis Khan -- here a national hero, not a bloodthirsty villain -- Mongolia can be a rewarding ethnomusical travel experience. The country is virtually unspoiled by tourism. It is also virtually unspoiled by hotels, restaurants, or bathrooms. For those hardy and intrepid enough to appreciate its rigors, Mongolia offers breathtaking scenery -- endless grasslands (the steppe), the great Gobi desert, and the high Altai mountain chain -- all occasionally inhabited by a genuine and lovely people. Though their reputation is fearsome, most travelers, including this one, find the Mongol people to be extremely gentle and friendly.

Desperately poor, the country presents a number of obstacles to the traveler -- not the least of which are obtaining a visa and trying to get there. Mongolia is just beginning to come out of its hard-line communist past and can still be tough about granting tourist visas, especially if you wish to travel on your own. Getting to Mongolia takes some doing as well. This past July, I flew on Russia's Aeroflot about 20 hours through Shannon, Ireland to Moscow, then took the Trans-Siberian Railroad four days to Irkutsk and Lake Baikal, deep in Siberia. From there I took the Trans-Mongolian Railroad two more days to reach Mongolia's capital, Ulaan Baatar.

If in a big hurry, this week-long journey could be shortened to as little as two days. From the United States, there are two directions around the world to Mongolia: east and west. Eastbound, flights go through many cities in Europe, then to Moscow, then onto Ulaan Baatar. Westbound, connections can be made through Taiwan, Tokyo, or Beijing. Either way, stopping only to change planes, travel takes between 36 to 48 hours.

The official language of Mongolia is Khalkha Mongol, which is in the Uralic-Altaic family of languages. A widespread and exotic group, the Uralic portion includes such diverse languages as Lapp, Finnish, Estonian, and Hungarian. The Altaic portion includes Turkic, Mongolian, and Manchu-Tungus. Within these three related language subgroups are Turkish and Tuvan, Kazakh and Kirghiz, Uzbek, Uighur, perhaps Korean, and possibly even Japanese. All of these are completely unrelated to Mandarin Chinese and the other Sino-Tibetan languages. Although linguistically, Mongol may be remote, the sound of Khalkha Mongol is surprisingly familiar: it sounds like Klingon -- lots of throat clearing "kha," "chu," "zhu," and "zks" -- sounds like those heard in Scottish "Loch," Hebrew "Chanukka," and German "guttenacht."

Musically, the sounds of the Mongols are somewhat similar to those of the Tuvans of Tuva in Russia (including their famous "throat-singing") and the Uighurs of Xinjiang in China (Xinjiang, or Sinkiang, is also called Chinese Turkestan). This is not surprising as these are all related Central Asian Mongol people, quite different from the Chinese Han. As Genghis Khan and his grandson Kublai Khan were conquerors of China, historically the Mongols and Chinese have been enemies. Thus, there is little connection to the culture or music of China generally.

Traditional Mongol music stems from their nomadic way of life. On the open steppe, a voice must be strong and powerful. Instruments had to be light and portable. With no entertainment other than what can be made by a family or group of families, song, with and without instrumental accompaniment, developed into a highly refined art. Mongol songs reflect their environment the seemingly endless grasslands of the steppe. They are filled with allusions to their herds of animals and to the mountains, pastures, and deserts of their country. To this day, it is the usual, not the unusual, to find a Mongolian family, pitched in their gher (or yurt) around a fire and cookstove, drinking airag (fermented mare's milk) and singing.

The human voice is the mostly highly regarded expression of Mongol music. Both men and women singers draw upon a repertoire of uniquely Central Asian musical styles. Mongol music may be divided into two broad categories: narratives and folk songs. Narratives mix singing with story telling and poetic recitation. Usually epic songs of praise, they feature such subjects as love, beauty, or heroism. A well-known example of this maglaal or tuuli style is the Mongolian epic song, "The Tale of Zhangar." Of course, unless one understands Khalkha Mongol, these tales will be lost on the listener.

On the other hand, even if the words of the folk song style are not understood, the rhythm and melody may easily be appreciated. Folk songs are generally divided into two types: the urtin duu, or long song, and the bogino duu, or short song. In urtin duu, the rhythm is non-metrical. Usually accompanied by the music of a horsehead fiddle, the singing is free and powerful. It requires a large voice and deep breath. In contrast, bogino duu is more rhythmic and can be quite "catchy" to the Western ear. Often, short songs may be accompaniment to game playing, sporting events, or the chores of tending livestock, such as milking. In either long or short song, one may hear xoomii singing (also spelled khoomii or hoomii).

No discussion of Mongol music would be complete without mentioning xoomii. Known in the West as "throat singing" or "mouth music," it is a complicated technique where the sounds of the vocal chords are resonated using the trachea and mouth cavity. The resulting sound is a combination somewhere between the sounds of a long whistle and a Jew's harp. This unique style of music originates in the western part of Mongolia which borders Tuva. The Tuvans are a people, in culture and language, ethnically close to Mongolians. Supposedly, the people of this region sing xoomii in an attempt to imitate the sounds of wind and water emanating from where a river passes between two cliffs.

Being a pastoral and seminomadic people, it should come as no surprise that the imagery of the horse is one of the leading subjects of Mongolian music. In a sense, the most important musical instrument in Mongolia is the horse -- or at least what can be made out of a horse. Legend has it that the swiftest of all horses, Jonung Khara Mori, had wings. His rider, a shooting star transformed to a young warrior-prince, falls in love with a beautiful shepherdess. Every night, the star-prince came to visit his maiden; every morning he left. One night, while the prince and his horse were sleeping, the shepherdess, in an attempt to keep her lover from leaving, cut off Jonung Khara Mori's wings. Nevertheless, the next morning, the prince and his horse were gone. But this time the prince and his flying steed could not continue their flight. They fell from the sky to an empty desert. Jonung Khara Mori was dead. In despair, the star-prince mourned his loss by making a musical instrument out of the horse's hide, its rib bones, tail, and head. The lamented horse was transformed into the first morin xuur (or khil khuur).

The morin xuur -- horsehead fiddle -- is the most widely used instrument in Mongolia and heard in virtually all collections of Mongolian music. Morin means "of a horse." It is a long, narrow, two-stringed instrument played with a bow. Both the strings and the bow are made from the hair of a horse's tail. Its frame is wood (no longer rib bones); its resonator covered with horse hide (now often a thin layer of wood); and at the top of the neck, a wood carving of a horse's head. It is always played by men.

In addition to the morin xuur, there are a number of other musical instruments in use. The ikh xuur is similar to the morin xuur, but larger and provides bass. The tov xuur is a two-stringed bowed lute, smaller and of a higher octave than the morin xuur. The carved head of a swan is found on the end of its neck. The shudraga is a long-necked lute of Chinese origin. It has a small round or oval-shaped resonator covered with snakeskin. Played mostly by women, its three silk strings are plucked. Like the shudraga, the yenchin (or yatag) is found in other parts of Asia. It is a zither (dulcimer), sometimes struck, sometimes plucked, of 26 strings and very similar to the Chinese yanggin. The limbe is a transverse flute with six finger holes. Originally made of bamboo, now they are often metal.

Not surprisingly, considering their admiration for xoomii singing, one of the most popular instruments in Mongolia is the xel xuur, or jew's harp. Xel means tongue and refers to the shape of a part of the instrument. The Mongolians recognize a number of different types of xel xuur, each with a particular sound and distinctive origin. The xel xuur, like xoomii, produces music that may best be described as otherworldly, sometimes haunting or eerie, sometimes spiritual or ethereal.

If your search is diligent, there are actually quite a few compact discs that feature Mongolian music. The following round-up of CDs is generally available in a well-stocked music store with a good "world" music selection. If a store like this does not exist in your area, they may be mail-ordered.

No collection would be complete without Mongolian Folk Music, a double CD by Hungaroton-UNESCO. Originally produced in 1967 as a deluxe boxed set of two long-play records, it came with a 50-page book featuring liner notes in five languages and many archival photographs of Mongolians and their instruments. The booklet in the two CD package now available is a reduced version of this and printed only in English. However, the discs feature the same high quality recordings and are representative of the various styles of typical folk singing.

A more recent, very professional, and quite accessible (to a Western ear), collection of Mongol music is available on PlayaSound-Auvidis, Mongolia: The Mandukhai Ensemble. The Ensemble features between a dozen to over 15 singers, musicians, and dancers. They occasionally may be seen on tour in Europe. The troupe alternates between group folk-singing and individual solos; both are excellent. The professionalism of the Ensemble and this recording are first rate. All musical styles are featured on this disc. Liner notes, in French and English, are good.

Excellent notes, including translations of the lyrics, are available on Jean Jenkins's compact disc entitled Vocal and Instrumental Music of Mongolia. Now available on a Topic Records CD, this is a re-release from a Tangent Records double LP from recordings made in 1974. Only problem -- these are field recordings. Containing some 25 different tracks, some may be measured in seconds, not minutes. Although completely authentic and interesting from an ethnomusical point of view, the disc might not be your first choice if just starting to experiment with Central Asian music. Similar remarks may be made regarding Mongolia-Traditional Music on Auvidis-UNESCO. Although these 1991 field recordings by famed French ethnic music producer Alain DesJacques cover many of the musical styles of Mongolia, the 30 tracks are short (50 seconds to two minutes) and do not lend themselves to a relaxed listening. Informative liner notes are in French, English, and German.

Without doubt, the most comprehensive -- and expert -- set of recordings of Mongol music is available on the World Music Library label. Although these Japanese CDs are expensive, each disc in the collection is superb. Liner notes are well-written and thorough; they are in English and Japanese. The recording quality is such that the Japanese must have either flown the artists to studios in Tokyo or flown a state-of-the-art studio to Ulaan Baatar.

If only one disc were to be purchased, I would start with Virtuosos from the Mongol Plateau. Descriptive liner notes, including several photos, accompany perhaps the most accessible recording of authentic Mongol music that I have heard. Virtuosos feature two back-to-back epic songs in praise of the Altai and Xangai mountains that literally transport the listener to these Mongolian mountains. Another disc worth mentioning is Mongolian Epic Song: Zhangar. This disc is notable for its narrative recordings, although as mentioned, much of this will be lost on a Western listener.

What is particularly remarkable about the World Music Library collectionz is its depth. One disc, Mongolian Songs, features the vocal arts of both men and women in long and short songs. Another, Mongolian Instrumental Music, is an exceptional display of the various instruments used in traditional Mongol music; the disc features musicians from the Mongolian Peoples Republic National Dance Troupe. Concentrating on one instrument, the horsehead fiddle, are two discs: Mongolian Morin Khuur, and The Art of Morin Khuur. The first features the morin xuur of maestro Chi Bulico, the second, a number of artists, including Hasluu Yulong, a Chinese recognized in Mongolia by a National Medal of Honour. Both discs are excellent.

From JVC World Records comes Hoomii and Urtin Duu: The Folk Music Traditions. Recorded at the Mongolian Folk Music Theatre in Ulaan Baatar in August of 1991, this disc is notable for its long song and xoomii recordings by musicians of a very high caliber. Recording quality is good as well.

Finally, two CDs produced by Alain DesJacques on the Ocora Radio France-Harmonia Mundi label must be reported as they are for the listener ready to branch out to even more diverse and exotic Mongol music. The first and perhaps most notable is Mongolie: Chamanes et Lamas. Released in 1994, from recordings made in 1991, 1992, and 1993, this CD features 70 minutes of Shamanist and Lama chants from Mongolian monks. Its superb recordings were taken live in the Buddhist Monasteries of Gandan Hiid, Ulaan Bastar and Erdene Dzuu Hiid, Karakorum. Those familiar with Tibetan Buddhist chants will recognize this music; Mongolia was converted to the Tibetan Lamaist form of Buddhism by Altan Khan (1507-83), a descendant of Genghis Khan. It is the purest Tibetan Buddhist country (outside of Tibet) on earth. Also found on this disc are rare chant recordings from the Dargads and Buryats, two of the lesser-known tribal Mongol peoples.

Released in 1993, the other Ocora disc is Mongolie: Chants Kazakh et tradition epique de l'Ouest. Although these 25 recordings (made in 1984 and 1990, averaging two to four minutes in length) were taken in the field, this disc is unique in that it features the Mongol Kazakh people. This ethnic Moslem minority group, constituting about five percent of the population, live in the far west of Mongolia, bordering the new Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan. These people and their nomadic culture are based in the high Altai mountain region, perhaps the most beautiful and rugged region of Mongolia. Both of these Ocora discs feature excellent liner notes in three languages, English, French, and German.

It must be admitted that music from Central Asia is an acquired taste; it is unfamiliar. But, for the listener with open ears and perhaps an open mind, the music can reveal a whole new world, very different from our own.

Long Songs
1. My Speckled Bay (2:16)
2. Two Little Ducks (5:35)
3. Horse With Light-Grey Coat (2:55)
4. The Beautiful Altai (2:47)
Horse-Viele
1. View Over The Kherelen River (2:54)
2. The Four Seasons (2:49)
3. Popular Dance Of Western Mongolia (2:19)
4. Dance Tune Of Western Mongolia (2:09)
5. The Black Stallion Zhonon Of The Khalka Mongols (2:18)
6. The Brown Silk Dress (2:09)
7. Movements Of A Blessing (1:49)
Tobshuur Lute
1. Linked Movements (0:54)
2. Colours Side By Side (1:02)
3. Bechaining (0:59)
4. Bechaining Movements (0:50)
5. Wake-like Dance (0:53)
6. Quick, Short Movements (2:30)
Short Songs
1. Surzhidmaa (1:21)
2. Saddle Flags Of Saykhiyu Leather (1:39)
3. These Shimmering Blue Mountains (1:49)
4. My Darling (2:43)
Songs For Special Occasions
1. Songs Of Praise Of The Horse (4:34)
2. Dembee (finger game) (1:23)
Instrumental Songs
1. Metal Jew's Harp (1:21)
2. Bamboo Jew's Harp (2:45)
3. Transverse Flute (2:20)
4. Four Stringed Viele (1:13)
5. Shanza Lute (2:20)
Diphonic Song
1. The Khoomej Lesson (2:46)
2. The 4 Year-old Light-tan Horse (1:49)

320 kbps including full scans

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