Embryo & Yoruba Dun Dun Orchestra

Posted By MiOd On 9:37 AM 0 comments
One of the most original and innovative Krautrock bands, Embryo fused traditional ethnic music with their own jazzy space rock style. Over their 30-year existence, during which Christian Burchard has been the only consistent member, the group has traveled the world, playing with hundreds of different musicians and releasing over 20 records.

Originally a jazzy space rock group, Embryo was formed in 1969 in Munich, Germany, by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, marimba), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone), Luther Meid (bass), Jimmy Jackson (organ), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion), Wolfgang Paap (drums), Ingo Schmidt (saxophone), and John Kelly (guitar). However, the lineup was already different by the time of the sessions for their debut album. The resulting record, Opal (1970), is considered the band's masterpiece of their early, more psychedelic sound. By the time of Embryo's Rache (1971), the group was already adding ethnic touches to their music.

In 1972, the same year they played at the Olympic Games in Munich, Embryo was invited by the Goethe Institute to tour Northern Africa and Portugal. In Morocco, the band was fascinated by the different tonal scales used by Moroccan musicians, profoundly shaping the group's music to come. In 1973, the band was joined by saxophonist Charlie Mariano and guitarist Roman Bunka, who were both influential in moving Embryo towards their genre-blending mixture of space rock with ethnic sounds. We Keep On, released in 1973, was the most successful album in the group's career. However, after Surfin' (1974) and Bad Heads and Bad Cats (1975), Burchard decided the band was moving in too commercial a direction and led them on an eight-month excursion to India, where they met local musicians. Shoba Gurtu, an Indian singer the band met during their travels, would later record an album with them, 1979's Apo Calypso. Embryo also set up their own record label, Schneeball, with the rock band Checkpoint Charlie during this time. The band then took off on a two-year journey through the Middle East, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, during which the band's bus broke down in Tehran in the middle of a civil war in 1981. The double album Embryo Reise (1981) captured this musical expedition as did the documentary film Vagabunden-Karawane. A

fter touring Asia, the Middle East, and Egypt during the early '80s, Embryo released their first studio album in seven years, Zack Gluck, in 1984. The band then toured Africa and became involved with Nigeria's Yoruba Dun Dun Ensemble. However, after internal conflicts, Embryo split up. Burchard then continued under the name of Embryo with new musicians while a new group, Embryos Dissidenten, was formed. The band released 2001 Live: Vol. 1.

(01) - Welt-Ab-Originale
(02) - Aye-Aye
(03) - Bata Solo
(04) - Mix III
(05) - Just Landed
(06) - Dun Dun Solo I
(07) - Dschamilua
(08) - Dun Dun Solo
(09) - A-Ara-E-Che-Kalo
(10) - Sawaba Beat
(11) - Laye Olu Gban

320 kbps including full Booklet scans

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Chinese Turkestan - The Muqam of the Dolan

Posted By MiOd On 8:37 AM 0 comments
Chinese Turkestan - The Muqam of the Dolan. Music of the Uighurs from the Taklamakan Desert, 2006

The Dolan are a sub-group of the Uighurs. They live in the immense desert of Taklamakan, in the center of the province of Xinjiang or Chinese Turkestan. This CD is devoted to their canonical musical repertory, the Muqam, which includes nine suites performed by three singers-drummers, a lutenist, a zither player and a spike fiddle player. This music, with its outbursts, its torn voices and its powerful drumming, evokes the Dolan village feasts and deserves its nickname of "Uighur Jazz".

1. Bash Bayawan
2. Zil Bayawan
3. Chöl Bayawan
4. Ötang Bayawan
5. Hudek Bayawan
6. Dugamet Bayawan
7. Bom Bayawan
8. Sim Bayawan
9. Jula

320 kbps including full Booklet scans

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Bukhara. Musical Crossroads of Asia

Posted By MiOd On 7:34 AM 0 comments
Bukhara. Musical Crossroads of Asia Smithsonian , 1991

In Bukhara, Uzbekistan, Jewish and Musilm musicians have created a unique sound in an ancient city of narrow streets, crowded bazaars, and varied influences. These 1990 digital recordings capture the nuances of the city's finest musicians in performance. Extensive notes include a description of each recording and an introduction to Bukharan music. In 1990, Theodore Levin and Otanazar Matykubov recorded the musical life of the ancient Central Asian trade center Bukhara. Their goal was to take an audio snapshot of a city that has for centuries created an amalgam of multiple musical cultures. Classical music of Persian Tajiks and Uzbeks mixes with Jewish and Islamic religious music, all of it overlaid with 70 years of Soviet cultural policy.

(01). Tofakhon with Ensemble Nozanin - Shod-i Uforash and Ufor-i Tezash: Dilbaram Shumo (02). Mahdi Ibodov - Mavrigi
(03). Tofakhon with Ensemble Nozanin - Songs from the Sozanda Repertory
(04). Mahdi Ibodov with Tofakhon and Ensemble Nozanin - Murghak
(05). Ochil Ibragimov and Suleiman Takhalov - Mogulcha-i Dugah
(06). Izro Malakhov with Mahmudjan Tojiboev, Kuva, Zakir Bobotonov, and Urgench - Ushshaq-i Kalon
(07). Saifullajan Musaev - Azan
(08). Dervish Orif Bobo Hamro Ogli - Na't
(09). Rakhamim Yakutelov - Yah Ribbon Olam
(10). Yakub Meer Ochildiev - Reading from the Torah
(11). Ochil Ibragimov - Shalom Aleichem and Kiddush
(12). Muhammed Aminjon Nasriddinov - Qalandar
(13). Isaac Kataev - Excerpt from the Zohar

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Birmanie - Myanmar

Posted By MiOd On 5:49 AM 0 comments
Birmanie - Myanmar Air Mail Music, 1998

Track Listings
--------------
(01). Shan music
(02). Shwe ozee music
(03). Danu ozee music
(04). Solo de nhe
(05). Let swanda
(06). Pattalar
(07). Saung
(08). Way za yan tar
(09). Pamingalar
(10). Kyuntor ji mahn chet
(11). Min galar zu taung
(12). Do poar parpar
(13). Do shan ozee
(14). Laphet ku
(15). To lur bway le gui the ray
(16). Ko kwa la na
(17). Kru nar nar
(18). Sor bi bai

320 kbps including Covers

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Academy of Shashmaqam - Invisible Face of the Beloved

Posted By MiOd On 4:21 AM 0 comments

Academy of Maqam Invisible Face of the Beloved. Classical Music of the
Tajiks and Uzbeks. Music of Central Asia Vol.2 Smithsonian, 2006

Amid the mosques and minarets of Samarkand and Bukhara, generations of vocalists set the mystical, Sufi-inspired verse of Hafiz and other classical poets to lyrical melodies, creating a spiritual art music of great refinement and sublime beauty called Shashmaqâm, confirming its important place among the great art music traditions of Euasia.

The ensemble is the Academy of Maqam, from Tajikistan; it has three lutelike stringed instruments, a single-frame drum and seven singers. The music is Shashmaqam, the Tajiks' prized classical form. And the drone of the lutes, the repeated riffs of irregular length, the warped feeling of the ''limping'' rhythm that slides the music between two different tempos -- these can connect to devices we know from Indian music, from certain slow, meditative metal bands, from jazz, from rock.

(01). Solo on the Sato (Abduvali Abdurashidov)
(02). Sarakhbor-i Râst
(03). Tarona 1
(04). Tarona 2
(05). Tarona 3
(06). Tarona 4
(07). Tarona 5
(08). Talqin-i Ushshâq
(09). Suporish Talqin-i Ushshâq
(10). Tarona
(11). Nasr-i Ushshâq
(12). Tarona 1
(13). Tarona 2
(14). Nawroz-i Sabo
(15). Talqincha-i Sabo
(16). First Suporish
(17). Ufor-i Ushshâq
(18). Final Suporish

Abduvali Abdurashidov - sato
Nasiba Amanbayeva - vocals
Azada Ashurova - vocals
Jamshed Ergashev - vocals
Kamaliddin Hamdamov - tanbur, vocals
Hurshed Ibrahimov - vocals
Murad Jumayev - vocals, dayra
Sirajiddin Jurayev - dutar
Zumrad Samijanova - vocals

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Bulgarie - Musique de tradition pastorale

Posted By MiOd On 9:42 PM 0 comments
Bulgarie / Bulgaria - Musique de tradition pastorale
/ Music of the Shepherds'Tradition, 2004
Track Listings
--------------
(01). Pastorale [Flūte Kaval]
(02). Paļdushko Horo [Cornemuse Gaļda]
(03). Chant ą Danser
(04). Ratchenitsa [Kaval]
(05). Na Prebulvane [Gaļda]
(06). Daļ Mi Mamo, Daļ Mi [Kaval] Rhodopes
(07). Pospusni Sa Shźr Planino
(08). Suite de Mariage (Wedding Suite) [Cornemuse Kaba Gaļda]
(09). Zashto Minavash Momme le ? [Chant et Gaļda][Version] Nord-Ouest
(10). Appel aux Brebis (Calling the Sheep) [Flūte Duduk]
(11). Narodno Horo [Duduk]
(12). Ratchenitsa [Duduk]
(13). Marko Todorka Zaliubi [Chant et Duduk]
(14). Snoshti Si Mamo Zamraknah
(15). Stoļan Si Shileta Paseshe [Chant et Duduk]
(16). Pastorale [Duduk]
(17). Vidinski Horo [Duduk et Grosse Caisse Tapan]

320 kbps mp3, including full booklet scans

HERE

Azad - Armenia, Traditional Music

Posted By MiOd On 8:09 PM 0 comments
Ensemble Azad Armenia - Traditional Music, 2006

The traditional music ensemble AZAD (‘Freedom’ in Armenian) performs festive and nostalgic music from Armenia. This recording, consisting mainly of instrumental pieces (there are two vocal tracks), takes us to visit the various regions of this mountainous country, with dance music – ‘aparani’ from north of Yerevan, ‘kotchari’ from eastern Anatolia, ‘shatakhi dzenapar’ from the Shatakh region – and pieces that accompany the daily lives of its people

(01). Le Berger 02. For Anne Marie
(03). Aparani
(04). Bouquet de Fleurs
(05). Hingala
(06). Kotchari
(07). Enzeli
(08). Hommage ą l'Arménie
(09). Hartanakh/Zonaradikos
(10). Ari Yar 11. Shatakhi Dzenapar
(12). Danse d'Arménie
(13). Danse des Pźcheurs

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Aashish Khan - Golden Strings of the Sarode

Posted By MiOd On 7:15 PM 0 comments
Golden Strings of the Sarode album by Aashish Khan was released Dec 13, 2005 on the Moment label. On this Grammy-nominated album, the sons of famous fathers carry on the important tradition of North Indian classical music, applying their virtuosic talents to three traditional raags. Golden Strings of the Sarode music CDs Aashish Khan, like his father Ali Akbar Khan, is a master of the 25-stringed sarode, a challenging sitar-like instrument. Golden Strings of the Sarode songs Zakir Hussain--son of celebrated tabla player Ustad Alla Rakha--is himself a gifted tabla player. Golden Strings of the Sarode album The two musicians play together so seamlessly, it is like listening to inspiration itself. Golden Strings of the Sarode CD music contains a single disc with 3 songs.

1. Raag Lalita Gouri [Alaap] - Aashish Khan
2. Raag Bhimpalashree [Gat in Jhaptal] - Aashish Khan
3. Raag Mishra Bhairavi [Gat in Dadra] - Aashish Khan

Personnel:
Aashish Khan (sarod);
Zakir Hussain (tabla).

320 kbps including Front Cover

HERE

Ililta - New Ethiopian Dance Music

Posted By MiOd On 10:06 AM 0 comments
Contemporary grooves from the Ethiopian scene -- and work that's almost as compelling as the 70s classics we've dug in the Ethiopiques series! The package illustrates a real revival in the Ethiopian scene of late -- a bit of a return to older styles of instrumentation, while still keeping things somewhat current as well -- yet often without any use of beats or electronics, as you might find in some other contemporary African scenes. Most of these numbers are highly rhythmic, but in an old school way -- and the vocals are often as offbeat as the instrumentation, which includes keyboards, guitars, and some nicely-tuned horns. Titles include "Awdamet", "Ye Gonder Lidj Netch", and "Memyew" by Chalachew Ashenafi, "Ye Salame" by Asfaw Tsege, "Ayada" by Zweyosh Abeye, "Wube Abeba" by Tesfay Wube, "Desse Lay" by Mohammed Jimmy Mohammed, "amamesso" by Habtu Demse, and "Ababille" by Etenesh Girma.

Track List
01. Munit - Chalachew Ashenafi
02. Ye Salame - Asfaw Tsegé
03. Arada - Zuryash Abeye
04. Awdamet - Chalachew Ashenafi
05. Ye Gonder lidj netch - Chalachew Ashenafi
06. Wube Abeba - Tesfay Wube
07. Ababille - Etenesh Girma
08. Desse Lay - Mohammed Jimmy Mohammed
09. Amamesso - Habtu Demse
10. Memyew - Chalachew Ashenafi
11. Eyoha - Asfaw Tsegé, Etenesh Girma, Debesay Zegeye, Habtu Demse

Manitas de Plata - Flamenco on Fire

Posted By MiOd On 5:20 AM 0 comments
Manitas de Plata
Flamenco on Fire. An Essential Collection of Passion & Soul, 2000
Track Listings
--------------
(01). Soleares
(02). El No-No
(03). Por Alegrias
(04). Danse de Manitas
(05). Una Torentas
(06). Guitarra de Camarque
(07). Rumbas Gitanas
(08). Boulerias
(09). Ay Que Te Quiero
(10). Castagna
(11). Rumba D'Espana

320 kbps; including full cover scans

HERE

Georgia - Crossroads

Posted By MiOd On 4:17 AM 0 comments
Georgia. Crossroads Air Mail Music, 2005

Georgia, to the south of the Caucasus mountain ranges, lies at the point where Europe and Asia meet. Although it belonged to the USSR for many years, Byzantine and Iranian cultural influences are strong in the country's music. This recording made in Georgia is devoted mainly to the male-voice choirs, for which the country is famed, and to superb flute pieces inspired by music from Turkey and the Balkans.

(01). Kolcheti - Rose In The Garden
(02). Salchino - Orovela
(03). Salchino - Alile
(04). Salchino - Mravalzhamner, Cheers
(05). Salchino - Zamtari
(06). Tbilisi Studio Orchestra - Georgia Folk Dance
(07). Orera - Adandali
(08). M. Macharadze & N. Bregvadze - Girl From Darkveti
(09). T. Kevkhishvili Vocal Group - Song Of The Forests
(10). Kolcheti - Song Of Love
(11). Salchino - Odona
(12). Kolcheti - Lyrical Song Beloved Girl
(13). Kolcheti - Mtkuluri
(14). Salchino - Chakrulo
(15). Kolcheti - Imeretin Jesting Song
(16). Kolcheti - Shephard's Song
(17). Salchino - Uruli
(18). Tbilisi Studio Orchestra - Dance Melody

320 kbps; including full cover scans

HERE

Corée - Korea

Posted By MiOd On 3:25 AM 0 comments
Corée - Korea Air Mail Music, 2003

Track Listings
--------------
(01). Hwa Cho Sa Go Ri (Flowers Story)
(02). Se Taryong (Birdsong)
(03). Hengbou Ga (The Younger Brother's Opera)
(04). Nolbou (The Older Brother)
(05). Hwa Gan Mu (The King's Dance)
(06). Jango Chum (The Drum's Dance)
(07). Sun Nyo Chum (The Angel's Dance)
(08). O'go Mu (The Five Drums' Dance)
(09). Bu Chae Chum (The Dance of the Fan)
(10). Sanko (Daegum Flute)

320 kbps; including Covers

HERE

China - From Pekin to Shanghai

Posted By MiOd On 8:48 PM 0 comments
China. From Pekin to Shanghai, 2006

Track Listings
--------------
(01). Ta Pa Pan
(02). Ti-Tse
(03). Ti-Tse/Pipa
(04). Pipa, Pt. 1
(05). Pipa, Pt. 2
(06). Pipa, Pt. 3
(07). Corbeaux De L'hiver Glissant Sur L'eau Gelee
(08). Plainte de la blanchisseuse
(09). En soulageant mon c ur
(10). Clair De Lune Sur Une Riviere Au Printemps
(11). Wu Hu You Lu Pei-Yuen - pipa Lai Siu-Hong - ti-tse Liang Tsai-Ping - cheng

320 kbps including full booklet scans

HERE

Angelique Kidjo - Oyo

Posted By MiOd On 8:23 PM 0 comments
Angelique Kidjo digs into her roots with her new Razor & Tie release, Oyo. Roots that reach far beyond her West African homeland of Benin, because Grammy Award winning singer,dancer and songwriter Kidjo is a definitive 21st century world artist. Her art roves across boundaries, genres and ethnicities, finding the connections that link musical forms from every part of the world,while still bonding closely with her own traditions.
The songs on Oyo,embrace rhythm & blues, soul music, jazz,and Beniese melodies,as well as four of her own original works. Featuring her unique interpretations of songs from artists as diverse as James Brown, Otis Redding,Miriam Makeba, and Santana and including guests John Legend,Bono, Roy Hargrove and Dianne Reeves. Oyo is a truly diverse collection reflecting the music that inspired Angelique growing up.

"Oyo" is an amazing new album from Benin's Angelique Kidjo. In her previous album, Djin Djin,she collaborated with her favorite artists, from Carlos Santana to Josh Groban and Joss Stone. This time, she covers songs that influenced her when she was young. She collaborates with Diane Reeves (The Best of Dianne Reeves),Bono (U218 Singles),Roy Hargrove (Ear Food) and John Legend (Evolver).

Kidjo does an Africanized, powerful version of Santana's "Samba Pa Ti" with Roy Hargrove. She sings with Bono and John Legend in "Move on up." "Kelele" is an ode to African highlife music, while "Afia" is an ode to Brazil. "Cold Sweat" is a tribute to James Brown. She covers "Mbube",a song that was a notable duet between the late Miriam Makeba and Harry Belafonte. In "Dil Mein Chhupa Ke Pyar Ka Too",Kidjo effectively covers a Bollywood hit. In "Out of Africa",she sings the theme for the Sidney Pollack movie (Out of Africa: 25th Anniversary (Blu-ray/DVD Combo)),but with a more African flavor. "Petite Fleur" is a tribute to the jazz great Sidney Bechet. There are two closing bonus tracks-"You can count on me",which is a theme for a UNICEF campaign to combat infant tetanus, and the reflective "Agblagba", inspired by (Say You're One of Them (Oprah's Book Club))

(01). Zelie
(02). Samba Pa Ti feat. Roy Hargrove
(03). Move On Up feat. John Legend
(04). Lakutshona Llanga
(05). I've Got Dreams To Remember
(06). Kelele
(07). Monfe Ran E feat. Dianne Reeves
(08). Dil Main Chuppa Ke Pyar Ka
(09). Petite Fleur
(10). Afia
(11). Cold Sweat
(12). Out Of Africa
(13). Mbube
(14). Atcha Houn
(15). You Can Count On Me (from the Unicef Campaign)
(16). Agbalagba (inspired by Uwem Akpan's book "Say You're One of Them")

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Paco De Lucia - Antologia

Posted By MiOd On 6:11 PM 0 comments
After Paco de Lucía’s long and celebrated career was rewarded with the 2004 Prince of Asturias Prize, this anthology is released, which, in a double CD, gathers pieces dating back to his early recordings from the 1960s (‘Punta Umbría’ and ‘En la Caleta’), passing through the rumbas, fandangos and tangos of the 1970s and 1980s, and which, of course, includes his famous ‘Entre dos aguas’, which was also immortalised for posterity in the compilation chill-out album ‘Café del Mar’.

The role of the flamenco guitar has evolved through the playing of Paco de Lucia (born Francisco Sanchez Gomez). The son of flamenco guitarist Antonio Sanchez and the brother of a flamenco guitarist, Ramon, and flamenco singer, Pepe, de Lucia has extended the former accompaniment-only tradition of flamenco guitar to include deeply personal melodic statements and modern instrumentation. His collaborations have included ten albums with late flamenco vocalist El Camaron de la Isla and work with American pianist Chick Corea and the Guitar Trio, featuring guitarists John McLaughlin, Larry Coryell, and Al DiMeola. His recordings with his sextet, which includes his brothers Ramon and Pepe, include such groundbreaking masterpieces as La Fabulosa Guitarra de Paco de Lucia, Fantasia Flamenca, Fuente y Caudal, Almoraima, and Zyryab. Yet, de Lucia has not completely forsaken traditional flamenco. His 1980 album, Interpreta a Manuel de Falla, paid homage to the classical composer and flamenco enthusiast, while his 1987 album, Siroco, marked a return to pure flamenco. "I have never lost the roots in my music," de Lucia said during a late-'90s interview, "because I would lose myself. What I have tried to do is have a hand holding onto tradition and the other scratching, digging in other places, trying to find new things I can bring into flamenco." Born in Algeciras, a small city in southernmost Spain's Cadiz province, de Lucia was bred to be a world-class musician. He trained with his father and brother from the age of five. Mastering the art of flamenco guitar by his 11th birthday, he made his public performance debut on Radio Algeciras in 1958. A year later, he received a special award at the Festival Concurso International Flamenco de Jerez de la Frontera. Heralded as a child prodigy, de Lucia was invited to join the flamenco troupe led by dancer Jose Greco at the age of 16. He remained with the group for three years. A turning point in de Lucia's musical development came while on tour with Greco's troupe in North America. Meeting Sabicas, the first flamenco guitarist to tour the world, he was instructed to pursue his own style of playing. Although he remained tied to traditional flamenco on his first two solo albums -- La Fabulosa Guitarra de Paco de Lucia in 1967 and Fantasia Flamenca in 1969 -- and recorded ten albums accompanying flamenco vocalist de la Isla, de Lucia continued to seek a personal approach. ~ Craig Harris, All Music Guide

Disc: 1
1-01 Almoraima Bulerias
1-02 Cancion De Amor
1-03 Gloria Al Nino Ricardo Solea
1-04 Solo Quiero Caminar Tangos
1-05 Punta Umbria Fandangos
1-06 Rio Ancho Rumba
1-07 Danza Ritual Del Fuego "El Amor Brujo"
1-08 Compadres Bulerias
1-09 Fuente Y Caudal Taranta
1-10 Casilda Tanguillos
1-11 Cepa Andaluza Buleria
1-12 Rumba Improvisada

Disc: 2
2-01 Zyryab "Melodia Del Puente" De J. A. Amargos
2-02 Guajiras De Lucia
2-03 Cobre Sevillanas
2-04 Monasterio De Sal Colombianas
2-05 Cana De Azucar Rumba
2-06 Barrio La Vina Alegrias
2-07 Tio Sabas Tarantas. Homenaje A Sabicas
2-08 La Barrosa Alegrias
2-09 La Cueva Del Gato Rondena
2-10 Chiquito
2-11 En La Caleta Malaguenas
2-12 Entre Dos Aguas Rumba
2-13 Aranjuez. Allegro Con Spirito

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No Blues - Lumen

Posted By MiOd On 12:26 PM 0 comments
No blues is a unique project which explores the connection between two musical worlds: americana and Arabic music.

For this project by Productiehuis Oost-Nederland (ON), Ad van Meurs (guitar), Haytham Safia (Ud, Arabic lute) and Anne-Maarten van Heuvelen (double bass) were invited; their assignment was to investigate a possible combination of folkblues and traditional Arabic music in a three-day session.

Both folk-blues and the Arabic taqsim (the improvised interplay without a fixed rhythm) are exceptionally suited for storytelling; the former in a somewhat rawer way, the latter mostly lyrical and melodic. In the same way as Leadbelly and Woody Guthrie documented their era in the early 20th century with their songs, the instrumentalist is the torchbearer of a centuries-old tradition in the virtually unwritten Arabic music culture. Traditional Arabic music differs from other music cultures in the way in which the music scale is subdivided. Thus the music can adopt forms that are nearly impossible in the western octave system.

In the No blues sessions the musicians soon succeeded in establishing a singular integration of folk-blues and Arabic music. A cross-breeding of Americana and Arabic music, we call Arabicana. Songs about ordinary folks, love and sadness, played and sung in the tradition that is characteristic for folk-blues as well as Arabic traditional music.

The sessions were concluded in 2004, and in 2005 the HT studio in Gemert was visited in order to make the recordings for the first CD "Farewell Shalabiye" (Rounder records RRECD10) under the supervision of Ankie Keultjes. The second CD "Ya Dunya" (Rounder records RRECD 20) was released in the fall of 2007 and has 2 songs together with Tracy Bonham, and the third, "Lumen" in 2009. On all three albums they cooperate with singer Ankie Keultjes and drummers Osama Maleegi and Eric van de Leist

(01). Fatuum Truus
(02). Footsteps
(03). Ommi
(04). Tes Yeux
(05). Across the Borderline
(06). Lumen (instrumental)
(07). Sawt (the Voice)
(08). Head Lock
(09). Long No Blues (instrumental)
(10). The River Wild
(11). Rollin' Maryam

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Centrafrique / Central Africa - Musique pour sanza en pays Gbaya

Posted By MiOd On 9:29 AM 0 comments
Centrafrique / Central Africa - Musique pour sanza en pays Gbaya / Sanza Music in the Land of the Gbaya, 1993
Track Listings
--------------
(01). Soré ga mo 1
(02). Soré ga mo 2
(03). Séam ko mè
(04). Yaa-tia
(05). Ndio
(06). Bondè ko bé hoyo 1
(07). Bondé ko bè hoyo 2
(08). Séam ko mè 2
(09). Naa-woro 1
(10). Yaa-tia 2 & Naa-woro 2
(11). Naa-koro 1
(12). Naa-koro 2
(13). Ndio 2
(14). Ndio 3
(15). Soré ga mo 3

Recorded in 1977

320 kbps including full booklet scans

HERE

Burkina Faso - Réjouissances chez les Siamou / Festivities among the Siamou

Posted By MiOd On 8:25 AM 0 comments
Burkina Faso - Réjouissances chez les Siamou
/ Festivities among the Siamou, 1997
Track Listings
--------------
1. Nul n'a d'ennemi - No one has enemies
2. Mon amour - My love
3. L'amitié est préférable à la richesse - Friendship is preferable to wealth
4. Blâme des jeunes filles frivoles - Blame of young frivolous girls
5. Il faut travailler pour gagner sa vie - We must work to earn a living
6. Chacun a son amour - Each one to this own love
7. Travaillez pour la nation - Work for the nation
8. L'entente est la meilleure solution - Agreement is the best solution

320 kbps including full booklet scans

HERE

Ferro Gaita - Rei di Funana

Posted By MiOd On 7:41 AM 0 comments
Track Listings
--------------
1. Bejo Bafatada
2. Caminho Longi
3. Agu Ta Disprinda
4. Rei Di Tabanka
5. A' Nacia Gomi
6. Ferro Gaita
7. Tareza
8. Mapu Mapu
9. Ka Ta Pupa
10. Fundo Baxo

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Gipsy Kings - Golden Hits

Posted By MiOd On 5:39 PM 0 comments
Gipsy Kings is a music group from Arles and Montpellier, France. They explained the evolution of their sound in the 1996 PBS documentary of their lives and music “Tierra Gitana (Gipsy Land)”. Young brothers Nicolas, Canut and Paul Reyes accompanied their father, famed flamenco singer Jose Reyes, who started out singing “cante jondo” (deep chant), traditional flamenco with long-running themes of passion, love, death, etc. But they began playing rumba flamenca because “we liked to watch pretty girls dance,” said Nicolas.

Latin American beats had been joined with flamenco by gitanos since at least the 1950s, mixing complex strumming with rhythmic, percussive tapping on their guitars’ tops. The new Reyes generation — soon to meet and join up with three guitar-playing brothers from the Baliardo family — began creating more pop-oriented songs. They played at roma parties and at street corners until they got their chance to record under the group’s new name, Gipsy Kings.

Sharp-eyed individuals might have noted that all the left-handed members of the group play guitars strung upside-down; this is usually as a result of the individuals’ not having their own guitars when growing-up. Borrowing and playing a right-hander’s the wrong way up was the only way to learn.

Band’s story
They became popular with their self-titled first album, Gipsy Kings, which included the songs “Djobi Djoba [1]”, “Bamboleo [2]” and the romantic ballad “Un Amor”.

Disc: 1
(01). Un Amor
(02). Djobi Djoba
(03). Escucha Me
(04). Viento Del Arena
(05). Este Mundo
(06). Trista Pena
(07). Galaxia
(08). Tu Quieres Volder
(09). Habla Me
(10). A Me Manera
(11). Volare
(12). Pida Me La
(13). La Dona
(14). Ternuras
(15). Baila Me
(16). Madre Mia
(17). Inspiration

Disc: 2
(01). Bamboleo
(02). Medley
(03). Caminando Por la Calle
(04). Vamos A Bailar
(05). No Volvere
(06). Love And Liberte
(07). Bem,Bem,Maria
(08). Camino
(09). Oy
(10). Passion
(11). Moorea
(12). La Quiero
(13). Allegria
(14). Quero Saber
(15). Soy

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Senegal - “Nalanke Pular”, Le Griot Peul Birame N'Daye

Posted By MiOd On 10:29 AM 0 comments
Birame N'Diaye
Senegal - Nalanke Pular. Le griot peule / A Fulbe Griot, 2005
Track Listings
--------------
(01). N'Douysé Kodo
(02). Aïnabé Naay
(03). N'Déwé Déwé Yo
(04). Sénégambie
(05). UPS
(06). N'Diaye Diatta
(07). Galoyabé
(08). Hé Diala
(09). Poulo Wawi Kodo
(10). Koten Sénégal

Artiste(s) :
Birame n' Diaye - Baba n' Diaye Issa Diao, Mamadou Fall, Mamadou Samb, Mamadou Sylla Ka, Adama Boye, Woury Boye, Dioubo Dia

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Aziz Herawi - Master Of Afghani Lutes

Posted By MiOd On 5:01 AM 0 comments
“An expatriate Afghani currently living in California, Herawi calls himself an amateur musician but is actually a rare performer of the traditional music from the Herat valley in western Afghanistan. As its geography suggests, this area's music is a blend of Persian and Hindustani instruments and styles. The pieces have the varied rhythms of the Hindustani raga forms, but are fairly short (3 to 5 minutes each) and more intense than much Hindustani music. In addition, their melodies are based on the even-tempered 12-tone octave that in recent decades has overtaken the traditional Persian system of microtonal variations. He plays the 14-string dutar, a long-necked lute, and the rebab, a short-necked lute, accompanied by tabla, frame drum, and tambourine that provide a vigorous and dry rhythm for his robust strumming. Herawi's strength is the energy and spontaneity of these instrumental pieces. Rather than refinement or cerebral meditation, there is a healthy share of earthy melodies and passion.”

These splendid performances on the long-necked, 14-string duhar and short-necked rebab (both backed by tabla) reflect the increasing Indian influence on Afghan music. Though Herawi is from Herat, a musical center that once had strong Persian connections, his playing is based on Indian ragas rather than older Afghan maqam, and the tabla playing is also strongly Indian. ~ John Storm Roberts

A: Nagmaha-ye Klasik in Rag Beiru (Instrumentals on dutar)
(01). Jhaptal / Dadra
(02). Kaharwa
(03). Kaharwa / Dadra
(04). Charbeiti Kaharwa
(05). Kaharwa / Dadra II B: (Instrumentals on dutar)
(06). Aushari
(07). Naghma I
(08). Mahali I
(09). Khandan-E Amaturi I
(10). Khandan-E Amaturi II
(11). Khandan-E Amaturi III C: (Instrumentals on rebab)
(12). Naghma-Ye Klasik In Rag Pari
(13). Naghma-Ye Klasik In Rag Pilu
(14). Mahali II
(15). Mahali III
(16). Naghma II
(17). Naghma III

Aziz Herawi - dutar (1-11), rebab (12-17) Ghulam Abbas Khan - tabla Omar Mojaddidi - zirbaghali (15) Azim Mojaddidi - daira zangi (tambourine) Anayat Habibi - daira zangi

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Music of the Mountains

Posted By MiOd On 4:08 AM 0 comments
Sound Scapes: Music of the Mountains
Pandit Shivkumar Sharma
Track Listings
--------------
1. Himalayan Dawn
2. Sunrise on the Peaks
3. Spirit of Kashmir
4. Echoes of the Valley
5. Mountain Love Song
6. Evening Prayer
7. Ballad
8. Twilight Shadows
9. Springtime
10. Shikara by Moonlight

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Yemen: Songs From Hadramawt

Posted By MiOd On 11:54 AM 0 comments
Yemen - Songs From Hadramawt
UNESCO Collection of Traditional Music of the World, 1998
Here the combination of singers and larger cast of accompanists does not detract from what is a characteristically Yemeni style of sung poetry. The program also highlights the dân form, a highly developed poetic-improvisational form of the region.

This repertory is unusual in that composers & poets are both often preserved and attributed (given as poet / composer above). There are often backing musicians in these performances which are not named.

Contents:

  1. Abdallah Mohammad ba Hassan / Sultan bin Sheikh Ali bin Harhara: Hadramî khayyâli - awwâdi: Atâha rasûli "My messenger came to her" (singer & ûd - Mohammed bin Shamikh, darbuka)
  2. Haddad bin Hassan al Kaf / Said Mbarek Marzuk: Dân tarab: Hayya layâli jamîla "Oh, beautiful nights" (singer - Hussein Abdul Kadir al Kaf)
  3. Mohammed bin Naser al Qu'aiti / Anon: Dân jammâla "Dân of the camel drivers" (singer - Hangil)
  4. Various / Anon., Sufi: Tahwîda, khuwaîb "Pilgrimage songs" (singer - Salim Rijab al-Tahhan)
  5. Nasir Yeslem bin Nasir, Hassan Abdallah ba Hartha, Ja'far Mohammed al Sakkaf / Ali 'Ubaid ba Seif (mediator): Jalsat dân "Dân session" (excerpt; singer - Said 'Idha ba Hashwan)
  6. Hussein Mohammed al Bar / Omar Sawwad: Dân tarab: Ana wa Khillî trâdina "My love and I have made up" (singer & ûd - Mohammed bin Shamikh, darbuka, daff)
  7. Anon: Dân jammâlla "Dân of the camel drivers" (singer - Awadh bin Yaslam Barik)
  8. Said 'Ummair Ba Harish: Ghinâ' Banî Maghra "Song of Bânî Maghra" (singer - Salim Rijab al-Tahhan)
  9. Sheik Abdalla al Nakhibi / Anon: Tarhîb: Bushrâk hâdha-l yaumu îd "Today is a feast day" (singer & ûd - Mohammed bin Shamikh, darbuka, daff)
  10. Haidar Agha, or Khamis Kindi / Anon., or Mohammed Juma Khan: Dân tarab: Khallî ashuf waddak yâ danîn "Show me tenderness" (singer & ûd - Saleh ba 'Issa, darbuka, daff)
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Anne-Sophie Mutter - Recital

Posted By MiOd On 8:36 AM 0 comments
German violinist. Her gifts as pianist and violinist were clear at an early age. Admired by Karajan when she played at Lucerne in 1976, she made her Salzburg Festival début when she was 14 and also her London début, playing first in the USA in 1980. She is noted for her shapely playing and warm tone in the standard repertory and has given premières of works by Lutosławski and others.

To capture the brilliant partnership between violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter and pianist Lambert Orkis, one only has to look to their riveting recording of Beethoven's Violin Sonatas. Over the course of those four CDs, the pair revealed themselves to be a lively, sympathetic team. The same description could be used for this single-CD recital, featuring four very different 20th-century compositions from four very different composers. The spiky nature and high notes of Prokofiev's Sonata stand in direct contrast with George Crumb's Four Nocturnes, a fragmented but short sonic journey filled with subtle harmonics and stark, hallucinogenic movements. Moving to Webern's Four Pieces, Mutter and Orkis literally define the essence of collaboration--there is no "star" here, other than the composer's somber work. The pair end the recital on its most gorgeous note: Respighi's Sonata for Violin and Piano in B minor. The richly lyrical, Romantic composition is the perfect showcase for the duo, and they deliver an electrifying performance. While Webern and Crumb may be acquired tastes, the Respighi piece is something everyone will love, filled with beautiful, expressive singing lines. These are great performances--Mutter's tone is impeccable and Orkis showcases his ever-increasing versatility. Great recorded sound, too. --Jason Verlinde
1. Sonata for violin & piano No. 2 in D major, Op. 94 bis
Composed by Sergey Prokofiev
with Anne-Sophie Mutter, Lambert Orkis

2. Nocturnes (4) (Night Music II), for violin & piano
Composed by George Crumb
with Anne-Sophie Mutter, Lambert Orkis

3. Pieces (4) for violin & piano, Op. 7
Composed by Anton Webern
with Anne-Sophie Mutter, Lambert Orkis

4. Sonata for violin & piano, in B minor, P. 110
Composed by Ottorino Respighi
with Anne-Sophie Mutter, Lambert Orkis

(01). Sonata for Violin and Piano No.2 in D, Op.94a – 1. Moderato
(02). Sonata for Violin and Piano No.2 in D, Op.94a – 2. Presto
(03). Sonata for Violin and Piano No.2 in D, Op.94a – 3. Andante
(04). Sonata for Violin and Piano No.2 in D, Op.94a – 4. Allegro con brio
(05). Four Nocturnes (Night Music II) – for violin and piano – Notturno I: serenamente
(06). Four Nocturnes (Night Music II) – for violin and piano – Notturno II: scorrevole, vivace possibile
(07). Four Nocturnes (Night Music II) – for violin and piano – Notturno III: contemplativo
(08). Four Nocturnes (Night Music II) – for violin and piano – Notturno IV: con un sentimento di nostalgia
(09). Four Pieces, Op.7 – for violin and piano – 1. Sehr langsam
(10). Four Pieces, Op.7 – for violin and piano – 2. Rasch
(11). Four Pieces, Op.7 – for violin and piano – 3. Sehr langsam
(12). Four Pieces, Op.7 – for violin and piano – 4. Bewegt
(13). Sonata for Violin and Piano in B minor – 1. Moderato
(14). Sonata for Violin and Piano in B minor – 2. Andante espressivo
(15). Sonata for Violin and Piano in B minor – 3. Passacaglia – Allegro moderato ma energico Allegro moderato, ma energico

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Bach : Die Kunst Der Fuge / The Art of the Fugue

Posted By MiOd On 4:09 AM 0 comments
Amsterdam Loeki Stardust Quartet Johann Sebastian Bach - The Art of Fugue Channel Classics, 1998
The Art of Fugue is a complex work -- not the first piece by Bach one falls in love with. We don't really know what instrument this was written for, as Bach wrote out each part on a separate line. There have been arrangements for nearly every conceivable combination. Some excellent versions are Vladimir Feltsman on piano, Grigory Sokolov on piano, Berliner Saxophon Quartett, Pittsburgh Symphony Brass, Bernard Lagace on organ, Jordi Savall on small ensemble period instruments. Purists will sneer, but I even like the excerpts recorded over a span of years by Glenn Gould on Sony. Unfortunately, though I like the Goldberg Variations on harpsichord, I have yet to find a version of AOF on harpsichord that I like. Back to the Amsterdam Loeki Stardust Quartet. Their version is distinguished by the fact that the sound of their recorders somewhat resembles that of an organ (naturally, both being wind through a column instruments) but much gentler. The different recorders have different timbre as well, making it easier to follow the line of each voice. Besides the sonic qualities, the interpretation is at the same time profound and yet dance like. These men are outstanding musicians. Generally I don't recommend an exotic instrumentation of a work as the first version to buy. But in this case anyone would do well to make this recording their first, or second, or tenth version of The Art of Fugue.

The Art of Fugue, for keyboard (or other instruments), BWV 1080

(01). Contrapunctus 1
(02). Contrapunctus 3
(03). Contrapunctus 2
(04). Contrapunctus 4
(05). Canon Alla Duodecima in Contrapunto Alla Quinta
(06). Contrapunctus 5
(07). Contrapunctus 6 A 4 in Stylo Francese
(08). Contrapunctus 7 a 4 Per Augment Et Diminut
(09). Contrapunctus 8 A 3
(10). Contrapunctus 9 A 4 Alla Duodecima
(11). Contrapunctus A 3 c
(12). Contrapunctus Inversus A 3 c
(13). Contrapunctus 10 a 4 Alla Decima
(14). Contrapunctus Inversus 12 A 4
(15). Contrapunctus Inversus 12 a 4
(16). Contrapunctus 11 a 4
(17). Canon Alla Ottava
(18). Fuga A 3 Soggetti

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Traditional Music From Egypt

Posted By MiOd On 3:18 AM 0 comments
Music of Egypt
Egyptian music has been an integral part of Egyptian culture since ancient times. The ancient Egyptians credited the god Thoth with the invention of music, which Osiris in turn used as part of his effort to civilize the world. The earliest material and representational evidence of Egyptian musical instruments dates to the Predyanstic period, but the evidence is more securely attested in the Old Kingdom when harps, flutes and double clarinets were played. Percussion instruments, lyres and lutes were added to orchestras by the Middle Kingdom. Cymbals frequently accompanied music and dance, much as they still do in Egypt today. Egyptian folk music, including the traditional Sufi zikr rituals, are the closest contemporary music genre to ancient Egyptian music, having preserved many of its features, rhythms and instruments.
In general, modern Egyptian music blends these indigenous traditions with Turkish, Arabic, and Western elements. Arabic music is usually said to have begun in the 7th century in Syria during the Umayyad dynasty. Early Arabic music was influenced by Byzantine, Indian and Persian forms, which were themselves heavily influenced by earlier Greek, Semitic, and ancient Egyptian music. The tonal structure of Arabic music is defined by the Maqamat, loosely similar to Western modes, while the rhythm of Arabic music is governed by the awzan (wazn, sing.), formed by combinations of accented and unaccented beats and rests.

Since the 1970s, Egyptian pop music has become increasingly important in Egyptian culture, particularly among the large youth population of Egypt. Egyptian folk music continues to be played during weddings and other traditional festivities. In the last quarter of the 20th century, Egyptian music was a way to communicate social and class issues. Among some of the most popular Egyptian pop singers today are Mohamed Mounir and Amr Diab.
Religious music remains an essential part of traditional Muslim and Coptic celebrations called mulids. Mulids are held in Egypt to celebrate the saint of a particular mosque or church. Muslim mulids are related to the Sufi Zikr ritual. The Egyptian flute, called the Ney, is commonly played at mulids. The liturgical music of the Coptic Church also constitutes an important element of Egyptian music and is said to have preserved many features of ancient Egyptian music.

Modern popular and folk traditions
Contemporary Egyptian music traces its beginnings to the creative work of luminaries such as Abdu-Al Hamuli, Almaz and Mahmud Osman, who were all patronized by Khedive Ismail, and who influenced the later work of Seyyid Darwich, Um Kulthoum, Mohammed Abdilwahhab, Abdel Halim Hafez, Zakariyya Ahmad and other Egyptian music giants.
Egyptian music began its recorded history in the 1910s, around the time composers such as Seyyid Darwich were incorporating western musical forms into their work. Some of the Middle East's biggest musical stars have been Egyptian. Um Kalthoum was especially popular, and is considered the most successful Egyptian recording artist in history. Most of these stars, including Um Kulthoum, were part of the classical Egyptian and Arabic music tradition. Some, like Abdilhaleem Hafez, were associated with the Egyptian nationalist movement in 1952.

Folk and roots revival
The 20th century has seen Cairo become associated with a roots revival. Musicians from across Egypt are keeping folk traditions alive, such as those of rural Egyptians (fellahin), the Nubians, and the Arab and Berber Bedouins. Mixtures of folk and pop have also risen from the Cairo hit factory.
Sawahli (coastal) music is a type of popular music from the northern coast, and is based around the simsimaya, an indigenous stringed instrument. Well-known singers include Abdo'l Iskandrani and Aid el-Gannirni.

Coptic
Coptic music is the liturgical music of the Coptic Church. It consists mainly of chanted hymns in rhythm with instruments such as cymbals (hand and large size) and the triangle. It has preserved some features of ancient Egyptian music, and few of its melodies are identified and labeled as Syrian (called Shamy in the Coptic Church) or Byzantine (called Roumy or Roman in the Coptic Church).

Bedouin
Bedouin music is found in the deserts of the west, near Libya, and the eastern Sinai area. The Mizmar, a twin-pipe clarinet, is the most popular folk instrument, and popular singers include Awad e'Medic.

Saidi (Upper Egyptian)
Egyptian musicians from Upper Egypt play a form of folk music called Saidi (Upper Egyptian). Metqal Qenawi's Les Musiciens du Nil are the most popular saidi group, and were chosen by the government to represent Egyptian folk music abroad. Other performers include Shoukoukou, Ahmad Ismail, Omar Gharzawi, Sohar Magdy and Ahmed Mougahid.

Nubian
Nubians are native to the south of Egypt and northern Sudan, though many live in Cairo and other cities. Nubian folk music can still be heard, but migration and intercultural contact with Egyptian and other musical genres have produced new innovations. Ali Hassan Kuban's jazz fusions had made him a regular on the world music scene, while Mohamed Mounir's social criticism and sophisticated pop have made him a star among Nubians, Egyptians, and other people worldwide. Ahmed Mounib, Mohamed Mounir's mentor, was by far the most notable Nubian singer to hit the Egyptian music scene, singing in both Egyptian Arabic and his native Nobiin. Hamza El Din is another popular Nubian artist, well-known on the world music scene and has collaborated with the Kronos Quartet.

Popular music
Until the late 1970s, classical singers like Um Kulthoum were Egypt's biggest pop stars. By the middle of the 1990s, though, Al Jeel and al shaabi music had taken over, especially among young audiences.
Starting in the late 1960s, light song emerged as the first modern Egyptian pop tradition. Often nationalist in tone, light songs were humorous and sometimes risqué. It was dominated by singers like Aida el-Shah and Leila Nazmi, who were popular in middle-class communities. The working class youth of Egypt reacted against light songs and shaabi music evolved out of Cairo's poorest districts. Shaabi began entering the mainstream of Egyptian society in 1971, with the breakthrough success of Ahmed Adaweyah.

Sha'abi
Adaweyah, by far the most popular Egyptian sha'abi singer in the history of Egyptian music, initially gained controversy for his lyrics, which were often humorous, salacious and highly critical of social rules and respectable society. By the 1980s, shaabi was being influenced by music from the United Kingdom and United States, as well as other Egyptian pop stars. Electric guitars, synthesizers, and later beat boxes, were integrated into the music, which is now highly-polished and meant for mainstream consumption. Today, the most popular shaabi stars are Hakeem and Shaaban Abdel Rahim.

Al Jeel
Al Jeel music genre arose in the 70s. It was dance-pop modeled after foreign rock and roll and pop music with a background rhythm similar to reggae, and it included distinctively Egyptian characteristics. Hamid el Shaery, a Libyan living in Egypt, was the most influential of Al-Jeel's early performers.

Bands
The start

After the second millennium, a music revolution was started in Egypt as bands started to become more popular and more famous year after year. It began with bands like Eftekasat and Wust El Balad with the help of El Sawy Cutlurewheel, Cairo Jazz Club, multiple cultural centers like the French Culture Centre. As a result, people started to become more aware of the different genres that could be presented by the different bands as the bigger Egyptian taste was more of pop artists like Amr Diab, Mohamed Mounir and Tamer Hosny. Other factors like the Metal Accord concert series which was quite a revolution in itself as metal-heads were labeled as satanists 10 years ago

Release of albums
The movement wasn't there yet as occasional concerts weren't enough for neither the bands nor the audience and the bands began to start thinking about making and releasing albums. Perhaps the first professional album was Mirror of Vibrations by ODIOUS. Although it wasn't a huge success it opened the door for other bands like Eftekasat to release their debut album Mouled Sidi El-Latini which was a hugh success and was covered relatively heavily by the media which covered mainly pop artists. The track "Mouled Sidi El-Latini" became very popular even among the fans of pop music. This started to raise questions and light up the dreams of several bands like Redeemers, Anoxia and of course Wust El Balad. Redeemers, a Symphonic Metal band, has already reached some notability as a result of their multiple concerts and recorded a promo CD which can be downloaded from their official website. Anoxia also became quite famous and received multiple underground awards that they are even preparing at the current time to release an album possibly next year. However, the major step was taken by Wust El Balad as they were the third band after Eftekasat to release a debut album. It came out in February 2008, 2 years after the release of Mouled Sidi El-Latini.

Concerts
Concerts became more and more popular and easier to be organized with the opening and the fame of several places, most notably El Sawy Culture wheel. Metal Accord and S.O.S. are probably the most famous and the most attended in Egypt together with the nearly daily presentations of both new and old bands at El Sawy Culture wheel. These major 3 helped present many new artists and bands like Nagham Masry, Shara, Asphalt, Hate Suffocation, Idle Mind, The Riff Band, etc... to the public, youth and adults alike of different genders and backgrounds. The revolution even reached the point to present the Christian band Better Life in S.O.S. 7! This very strong introduction became supported with the presentation of professional bands like The Scorpions in 2006 and the 2008 concert which was supposed to feature the first death metal band ever to perform in Egypt, Vader. The concert was supposed to feature Nerve cell and the Egyptian bands Worm and Dark Philosophy in order to support Vader. After the tickets were sold, the concert was cancelled due to security reasons and the pressure applied by the government as people starting protesting against bringing a satanic band into an Islamic country after the lyrics of Halleluiah!!! (God is Dead)" were posted on a Face book group with the Arabic translation.

Revival of Ancient Egyptian music
In the early 20th century, interest in the music of the pharaonic period began to grow, inspired by the research of such foreign-born musicologists as Hans Hickmann. By the early 21st century, Egyptian musicians and musicologists led by the musicology professor Khairy El-Malt at Helwan University in Cairo had begun to reconstruct musical instruments of Ancient Egypt, a project that is ongoing.

1. Zouroni
2. Anta Oumri
3. Allallah Teoud
4. Kalthoum
5. Ya Zahra Fee Khayalee
6. Ya Habaybi Ya Ghaybin
7. Fakarouni
8. Dokou El Mazaher
9. Ah Ya Zen
10. Kom Ombo

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Abdullah Ibrahim - Zimbabwe

Posted By MiOd On 4:30 PM 0 comments
The melodic sounds of South Africa are fused with the improvisation of jazz and the technical proficiency of classical music by South Africa-born pianist Dollar Brand or, as he's called himself since converting to Islam in 1968, Abdullah Ibrahim. Since attracting international acclaim as a member of the Jazz Epistles, one of South Africa's first jazz bands, he has continued to explore new ground with his imaginative playing. Exposed to a variety of music as a youngster, including traditional African music, religious songs, and jazz, Brand began studying piano at the age of seven. Becoming a professional musician in 1949, he performed with such South African groups as the Tuxedo Slickers and the Willie Max Big Band. Ten years later, he joined the Jazz Epistles, a group featuring trumpet player Hugh Masekela and alto saxophonist Kippi Moeketsi. The band, which had been formed in 1959 by American pianist John Mehegan for a recording session, Jazz in Africa, had recorded the first jazz album by South African musicians.

In 1962, Brand left South Africa with vocalist Sathima Bea Benjamin; the two were married in 1965, and temporarily settled in Zurich. Performing with his trio, which featured bassist Johnny Gertze and drummer Makaya Ntshoko, Brand was heard by Duke Ellington at the Africana Club. Ellington was so impressed that he arranged a recording session for Brand and the trio. The resulting album, Duke Ellington Presents the Dollar Brand Trio, was released on the Reprise label in 1963. He continued to be supported by Ellington following the album's release. In addition to being booked to play (at Ellington's urging) at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1965, Brand served as Ellington's substitute and performed five shows with the Ellington Orchestra the following year. Shortly afterwards, he disbanded the trio and accepted an invitation to join Elvin Jones' quartet. The collaboration with Jones lasted six months. After leaving the Jones quartet, he continued to be involved with a variety of projects. Besides touring as a soloist in 1968, he worked with bands led by Don Cherry and Gato Barbieri. Briefly returning to South Africa in 1976, the now Abdullah Ibrahim settled in New York the same year. Although he returned to South Africa to live in 1990, he continued to divide his time between his birthplace and his adopted home in New York.

In 1997, Ibrahim collaborated on an album and tour with jazz drummer Max Roach. The following year, Swiss composer Daniel Schnyder arranged several of his compositions for a 22-piece orchestra for a Swiss television production, and for a world tour undertaken by the full-sized Munich Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Barbara Yahr of the United States. Ibrahim continued to perform and record for the remainder of the 1990s and throughout the 2000s, releasing such notable albums as African Suite (1999, Enja), Cape Town Revisited (2000, Enja; recorded in 1997), Ekapa Lodumo (2001, Enja/Tiptoe), African Magic (2003, Enja/Justin Time), Senzo (2008, Sunnyside), and Bombella (2009, Intuition). Ibrahim has also composed the scores for such films as Chocolat and No Fear No Die. ~ Craig Harris, All Music Guide

This was a nicely blended, somewhat mellow and seemingly quite finished recording by Abdullah Ibrahim with Carlos Ward (alto sax, flute), Essiet Okun Essiet (bass), and Don Mumford (drums) called Zimbabwe. Interspaced with non-originals were four Ibrahim compositions, most of which were inspired by the imagery from Ibrahim's South African roots. ~ Bob Rusch, Cadence

Personnel: Abdullah Ibrahim (piano), Carlos Ward (alto saxophone, flute), Essiet Okun Essiet (bass), Don Mumford (drums).

[01]. Kramat (A. Ibrahim)
[02]. Guilty (Kahn - Akst - Whiting)
[03]. Bobmella (A. Ibrahim) - 6:26
[04]. Don't Blame Me (Fields - McHugh)
[05]. Zimbabwe (A. Ibrahim)
[06]. It Never Entered My Mind (R. Rogers - L. Hart)
[07]. For Coltrane, No 11 (A. Ibrahim)

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Forever Classics '5' - Mendelssohn

Posted By MiOd On 12:22 PM 0 comments
Forever Classics '1' - Bach
Forever Classics '2' - Beethoven
Forever Classics '3' - Dvorak
Forever Classics '4' - Hendel
Track Listings
--------------
[01]. The Hebrides Overture (Fingal's Cave) Op. 26
[02]. Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64, I: Allegro molto appassionato
[03]. Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64, II: Andante
[04]. Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64, III: Allegretto non troppo- Allegro molto vivace
[05]. Symphony No. 4 in A Major (Italian) Op. 90, I: Allegro vivace
[06]. Symphony No. 4 in A Major (Italian) Op. 90, II: Andante con moto
[07]. Symphony No. 4 in A Major (Italian) Op. 90, III: Con moto moderato
[08]. Symphony No. 4 in A Major (Italian) Op. 90, IV: Saltarello, Presto

Ape (EAC Rip): 330 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 160 MB | Covers

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Afghanistan: Female Musicians in Herat

Posted By MiOd On 6:29 AM 0 comments
Afghanistan. Female Musicians of Herat Auvidis/UNESCO, 2002
Alt text
Once a major cultural centre of the Timurid Empire (15th century), the fascinating medieval city of Herat, in western Afghanistan, has for many centuries enjoyed a reputation for excellence in the arts. The albums "Traditional Music of Herat" and "Female Musicians of Herat" offer a variety of vocal and instrumental music from the Herat region with traditional instruments such as dutâr, chahârtâr, sornâr and dohol, dâira, nai chapâni and robâb. These recordings were made just before the start of the civil war, which disrupted the life of this ancient centre of Islamic culture. Recorded in 1973 - 1977 Text by John Baily (01). Bibi Gol Afruz (02). Galen dokhtar (03). Girl’s music: Clapping and drumming * O bachen aughān * Ānār dāneh nadāre (04). Chahārbeiti sābeqeh * Chahārbeiti Siāh Mu o Jalāli (05). Lullaby (06). Adam Khān (07). Urban band dance music: Logari * Mustafā * Shishkebab (08). Dāireh dance pieces (09). Hawābeh jan Hawābeh * Ghu ghu balg-e chenār (10). Alā zan-e biweh * Sar-e pul-e Mālān (11). Asp-e khāseh zin konum (12). Yār-e hamdam chere nemiyāyi? (13). Tambaku * Arus gham nakhor (14). Processional drumming (15). Wedding ritual sequence: Olang olanng and Shelengi * Bādā bādā * Logari (16). Bibi gol arus (17). Shāh dokhtar shekar dokhtar (18). Chahārbeiti (19). Chahārbeiti barāye khodāhāfez (20). Najibeh gom shode (21). Leilā Leilā Leilā (22). Sefid kheimeh siāh kheimeh khorāmān 320 kbps including full booklet scans HERE

Sudan: Music of the Blue Nile Province

Posted By MiOd On 5:14 AM 0 comments
Sudan: Music Of The Blue Nile Province:
The Ingessna & Berta Tribes
Sudan Music Of The Blue Nile Province The Ingessna Berta Tribes songs Recorded in 1980. Sudan Music Of The Blue Nile Province The Ingessna Berta Tribes album Includes liner notes by Robert Gottlieb

(01). Ceremonial Dance Song - Ingeeana Tribe
(02). Solo Songs With Lyre Accompaniment - Ingeeana Tribe
(03). Solo Songs With Lyre Accompaniment - Ingeeana Tribe
(04). Kamdin. Bal-Ensemble - Ingeeana Tribe
(05). Krogder. Bal-Ensemble - Ingeeana Tribe
(06). Jen Anatai. Bal-Ensemble - Ingeeana Tribe
(07). Al Shammasha. Waza-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(08). Sozea Gaita. Waza-Ensemle - Berta Tribe
(09). Wadaberi. Waza-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(10). Afinadigi. Waza-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(11). Gundi Aja. Waza-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(12). ABBA Musa. Waza-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(13). Adodo. Waza-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(14). Ya Musa. Waza-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(15). Watana Numeiry. Bulhu-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(16). Watana Numeiry. Bulhu-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(17). Bulhu Scale - Berta Tribe
(18). Ania. Bulhu-Ensemble - Berta Tribe
(19). Aferi. Bulhu-Ensemble - Berta Tribe

Flac tracks (EAC Rip): 280 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 160 MB | Booklet Scans

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Cafe Arabia - Anthology of chillout classics

Posted By MiOd On 2:09 AM 0 comments
Cafe Arabia, Vol. 1-3 "ANTHOLOGY OF CHILLOUT CLASSICS" ABDEL HALIM HAFEZ FAIRUZ MOHAMMED ABDU LAYLA MOURAD FARID EL ATRACHE WARDA TALAL EL MADDAH NAGAT MOHAMED ABDEL WAHAB FAYZA AHMED WADI ELSAFI SABAH

CD1: Cafe Arabia 1. Anthology Of Chillout Classics

[01]. Habbeytak Fairuz
[02]. El Hawa Hawaya Abdel Halim Hafez
[03]. Walla Zaman Warda
[04]. Hallet Ya Rabee Mohammed Abdel Wahab
[05]. Khodni Ma'ak Shadia
[06]. El Ward Gameil Sayed Makawi
[07]. Rah El Hawa Layla Murad
[08]. Asmar Aabar Mohammed Abdo
[09]. Mahla Eishat El Fallah Najat

CD2: Cafe Arabia 2. Anthology Of Chillout Classics

[01]. Alachan Malich Gheirak Farid El Atrache
[02]. Dak El Hawa Fairuz
[03]. Al Toba Abdel Halim Hafez
[04]. Tab Wana Maly Warda
[05]. Intizari Taal Talal El Maddah
[06]. Etmakhtary Ya Kheil Layla Mourad
[07]. Weili Laou Yedroun Wadih El Safi
[08]. Balash Tebosny Mohamed Abdel Wahab
[09]. Ya Msafer Wahdak Najat
[10]. Habibi Yess'ed Aw'atoh Sayed Makkawi

CD3: Cafe Arabia 3. Anthology Of Chillout Classics

[01]. Magadir Warda
[02]. Echtaktellak Farid El Atrache
[03]. Ya Dala Dallaa Sabah
[04]. Allah Yijazi Talal El Maddah
[05]. Chahreyn Ou Chouayya Fayza Ahmed
[06]. Mafeesh Foulous Nasri Shams Eldine
[07]. Ghannili Chouaya Issam Raggi
[08]. Ya Hala Bildayf Samira Tawfic
[09]. Hamdilla Al Salanna Nagat
[10]. Idi Ala Khadi Wadih El Safi 11. Kan Ya Makan Fairuz

APE (EAC Rip): 1050 MB | MP3 - 320 kbs: 480 MB | Covers

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Taj Mahal Meets the Culture Musical Club of Zanzibar - Mkutano

Posted By MiOd On 11:03 PM 0 comments
Taj Mahal Meets the Culture Musical Club of Zanzibar
Mkutano, 2003

Alt text
Taj Mahal goes Zanzibar. As early as the first few bars of the opening song “Dhow Countries” it becomes evident that Taj Mahal’s latest African journey is a musical winner. Not only did he take his blues to a place that is the stuff of myth and fantasy, this East African island just off the coast of Tanzania has been capturing the man’s imagination and spirit in a profound kind of way. “Dhow Countries” is a slow and meditative blues in a minor key. A tender evocation of African moods with lots of feeling, enhanced by the sounds of the Culture Musical Club of Zanzibar, the first and foremost taarab orchestra of Zanzibar.
„Muhoga wa jang’ombe“ is next and presents the Culture Musical Club in full glory. Taarab music from Zanzibar still stands as a musical universe in itself, a one-of-a-kind combination of Arabic, African and Asian musical traditions. There doesn’t seem to be anything like it anywhere else and it‘s richness has never been fully revealed or analysed, it seems. The orchestra is set up in various sections that mirror the eventful cultural and social history of Zanzibar. First of all there’s a powerful Arabian section consisting of qanun (cittern), oud (Arabic lute), nai (flute) and a number of violins. Especially the latter allude to the tradition of Egyptian film orchestras and also the traditions of Western and Indian classical music. Accordions and double bass are in the mix as well and the percussion department mostly consists of dumbak and bongos. On top of all this instrumental richness, there are the voices: male and female solo singers and choruses. To this day, the Culture Musical Club plays an essential part in the island’s cultural and social life. It’s a sort of „national orchestra“ and it has more or less single-handedly created the sounds of contemporary taarab from Zanzibar. The orchestra still provides a center of social activities for people in an environment of communication and music.

The three African-Americans on board go way back by now: Taj Mahal (vocals, guitar, banjo), Bill Rich (electric bass) and Kester Smith (drums). These three African-Americans always seem to enjoy plunging into a musical culture that’s different from the West in as much as it’s not been totally commerzialised and put on the marketplace for immediate consumption. Despite touring internationally, this orchestra from Zanzibar is still hanging on to its original identity as keeper of social traditions. No elaborate wedding ceremony in Zanzibar is complete without their musical contribution. It sure is a long way from the juke joints of Mississippi or the clubs of Chicago, indeed, but any blues scholar will be able to come up with some striking similarities concerning the social importance the blues has played for the people in past times, especially for the African-American community. But despite the many cultural differences of the two groups of musicians involved, a wonderful breaching of the gap occured. Taj Mahal took his blues – and the African-born banjo – to this remote African island of legendary and mythic stature. A place where the music has kept some mystery, it seems.
Some local heroes also took part. Female singer Bikidude is well into her nineties and a living legend - the most famous musical ambassador from Zanzibar. Next to her musical prowess, the myth of Bikidude is based on a number of real-life incidents. At the age of thirteen she fled from an enforced marriage into Tanzania, where she crossed the country barefoot. She left a second unhappy marriage and took a traditional dhow sailing-boat to Egypt. It was there she became a singer. She took off her veil and shaved her head. Thus, she created an alternative and somewhat provocative new role model for Islamic women in Zanzibar. Bikidude drank and smoked, she flirted and danced, she sang and played the drums. A major artist from Zanzibar still and singing on this album.

Taj Mahal is still a restless man. His career has exceeded a forty-year time-span by now and he’s been a recording artist for just a little less. His discography feature more than three dozen albums. His classic credo is still valid: “In the end, ultimately, the music plays you, you don’t play the music.” The man is more than just a performer – he’s also a receiver. The spirits of the ancestors have been working their way into his new project again. The meeting place is a spiritual terrain on which everyone taking part seems to be moving. Even a very secular song like “Catfish Blues” seems to be infused by these spirits, creating a unified and unifying concord of souls. This is even more evident in a song like “Naahidi Kulienzi”, Taj’s duet with singer Makame Faki.

Despite this fascinating unity of spirit, the search for the all-important moment of truthful musical communication becomes audible as well. But even this struggle provides valuable moments of musical authenticity. When Mahal’s banjo and the orchestra’s violins embark on a journey through the pentatonics of the blues („M’Banjo“), the listener becomes a witness to the process of finding mutual musical linguistics. TAJ MAHAL MEETS THE CULTURE MUSICAL CLUB OF ZANZIBAR presents another fascinating chapter of Taj Mahal’s ongoing musical journey to the source – nothing more and nothing less. It will not be his last. The search goes on.

Taj Mahal goes to Zanzibar. As early as the first few bars of the opening song "Dhow Countries" it becomes apparent that Taj Mahal's latest African journey is a musical winner. Not only did he take his blues to a place that is the stuff of myth and fantasy, but enhanced it with the sounds of the Culture Musical Club Of Zanzibar who are the foremost taarab orchestra of Zanzibar. Fellow African - Americans Bill Rich (electric bass) and Kester Smith (Drums), who are both very good friends of Taj Mahal's, help him to fuse the sounds of Zanzibar with the blues of America. Zanzibar is a cultural infusion of Arabic and African influences and right from the off this album is exceptional, with tracks like "Muhoga wa jang'ombe" bringing together an array of musical tradition from the Arabic, African, Asian and American continents. This album really does show Taj Mahals' musical ability to the full.

Here's an album so atmospheric you need a decompression chamber after you've heard it. He was born Henry St Clair Fredericks (in New York) but it came to him in a dream that he should call himself Taj Mahal. He's been on a musical odyssey since the 1960s, paying homage to every type of black music he can find - not dissimilar from the path chosen by Ry Cooder, with whom the parallels are obvious - together they formed the short-lived Rising Sons in 1966, and as solo artists both have made album collaborations with Ali Farka Toure and the veena player, V.M. Bhatt. So Taj is already an experienced African musical traveller - he's also done one with Malian kora player Toumani Diabate. Not all TM's experimental albums work, but this one from Zanzibar is a winner all the way.

From Samuel Charter's field trip to Ghana in the 1950s there has been a yearning to connect African-American music with Africa, either directly (did blues forms originate in griot singing?) or indirectly (does the blues singer inhabit the same cultural space as (say) the griots of West Africa?) But the dots cannot be joined so easily and the scholars have returned emptyhanded. When Ali Farka Toure was heard by Westeners the eureka cries were stifled when it was found that he learned all his blues from John Lee Hooker records. So there is a poignancy to TM's quest to marry the lush taarab music of Zanzibar with the soft, sad lilt of the country blues - the latest chapter of his "ongoing musical journey to the source - nothing more and nothing less" as the blurb says.

The Culture Musical Club of Zanzibar, one of the country's prominent folk orchestras (est. 1958), combines Arabic and African traditions, so the lineup includes accordions, nai, three violins, sanduku and three singers, one of which is Bikidude who is, apparently, well into her nineties. Taj brought his rhythm section along, and the ensuing soft collision is like a dream John Fahey might have had, "Stomping Tonight on the Banks of the Mississippi/Rufiji Confluence".
This was indeed an experimental album. The press release says "there was no chance in preparing the music to be made in advance". Some experiments fail, and Taj could have been left with a heap of bent sandukus and smouldering accordions. Instead of which we now have this lovely dream of an album.

Alt text

1. Dhow Countries
2. Muhoga Wa Jang'ombe
3. Zanzibar
4. Catfish Blues
5. Naahidi Kulienzi
6. Mkutano
7. Done Changed My Way Of Living
8. M'Banjo
9. Mpunga

320 kbps including full scans

HERE

Ustad Bismillah Khan - Shehnai

Posted By MiOd On 7:49 AM 0 comments
Ustad Bismillah Khan - Shehnai (Vinyl rip)
Ustad Bismillah Khan (21st March 1916–21st August 2006) was a shehnai player from India. The term “Ustad” or “Pandit” in relation to Indian classical music means Master or Guru.

He was the third classical musician to be awarded the Bharat Ratna (in 2001), the highest civilian honour in India. He also had the distinction of being one of the few people to be awarded all the top four civilian awards.

Ustad Bismillah Khan was born on 21st March 1916 at Bhirung Raut Ki Gali, in Dumraon, the second son of Paigambar Khan and Mitthan. He was named as Qamaruddin to rhyme with Shamsuddin, their first son. His grandfather, Rasool Baksh Khan uttered “Bismillah” after looking at the newborn, thus he was named Bismillah Khan.

His ancestors were court musicians in the princely states of Bhojpur, now in Bihar state. His father was a shehnai player in the court of Maharaja Keshav Prasad Singh of Dumraon Estate, now in Bihar. He received his training under his uncle, the late Ali Baksh “Vilayatu”, a shehnai player attached to Varanasi’s Vishwanath Temple.

Ustad Bismillah Khan was perhaps single handedly responsible for making the shehnai a famous classical instrument. He brought the shehnai to the center stage of Indian music with his concert in the Calcutta All India Music Conference in 1937. He was credited with having almost monopoly over the instrument as he and the shehnai are almost synomyms.

1. Raga Jaunpuri Alap and Gat - Teental (Side One)
2. Raga Iman Kalyan - Teental Purvi Dhun - Kaharwa (Side Two)

320 kbps including Covers

HERE

The Highlife Allstars - Sankofa

Posted By MiOd On 7:07 AM 0 comments
The Highlife Allstars
Sankofa, 2001
International fans of West African highlife music have not had much to be happy about in recent years. Ever since Congo music edged highlife aside as the great pan-national dance music of Africa--a fait accompli by the mid 70s--Ghana and Nigeria have produced precious little of the venerable sound. Highlife came of age during the 1950s, a winning blend of recreational palmwine guitar music, and military brass band music. The style's greatest early exponent, E.T. Mensah, brought calypso into the mix and brought the music to a whole new level. But there's been little new to report in Ghana's highlife scene for most of the past two decades.
That fact alone would make these contemporary highlife recordings from Accra, Ghana, newsworthy. The good news is, they're also fantastic, full of the guitar interplay, emotive vocal harmonies, relaxed horn arranging and soulful warmth that made this music a hit in the first place. These nine tracks feature four groups involving both highlife veterans and rare younger musicians with a feel for the style. Alex Konadu and his International Band, from Kumasi, modern capital of the Ashanti State, contribute four selections, including the opener, "Mafe Wo," with its lulling palmwine intro, easy lobe and sunny horn arrangement. This is classic highlife, briskly rendered in a contemporary recording.
The elliptical tug and slide of palmwine guitar with its prominent use of blues-related dominant-seventh chords is a staple here, nowhere more so than on two acoustic tracks by Kwadwo Tawia. Tawia is that rare item, a palmwine player under 40! He combines electric and acoustic guitars, hand percussion and the seldom heard penpensiwa, a Ghanain thumb piano, creating a rich setting for his lithe, expressive voice.
This collection's sweetest vocal hook comes from Prince Osei Kofi, an alumnus of highlife's legendary African Brothers. "Enye Mea," a guitar-driven chugger, really hits home with its rich, tuneful call-response-singing. But the prize for guitar tangling goes to Konadu's band, which evokes Congo music, palmwine, and the countrified chromaticism of Chet Atkins on various songs. Kwaku Abeka's Arcobrass Band deliver the rousing closer, a song with the aggressive pump of Trinidadian soca.
This release puts the lie to the notion that Ghana's highlife is dead. Let's hope there's more where this came from! - Banning Eyre

1. Alex Konadu's International Band - Mafe Wo
2. Alex Konadu's International Band - Medan Wo
3. Kwadwo Tawiah - Otwee Emporo
4. Prince Osei Kofi & His African Heroes - Enye Mea
5. Prince Osei Kofi & His African Heroes - Fine Boy
6. Alex Konadu's International Band - Abrabo
7. Alex Konadu's International Band - Odehyee
8. Kwadwo Tawiah - Me Mere Beba
9. Kwaku Abeka's Arcobrass Band - Odo Ye Owu

320 kbps including full scans

HERE

The Highlife Allstars - Sankofa

Posted By MiOd On 7:07 AM 0 comments
The Highlife Allstars
Sankofa, 2001
International fans of West African highlife music have not had much to be happy about in recent years. Ever since Congo music edged highlife aside as the great pan-national dance music of Africa--a fait accompli by the mid 70s--Ghana and Nigeria have produced precious little of the venerable sound. Highlife came of age during the 1950s, a winning blend of recreational palmwine guitar music, and military brass band music. The style's greatest early exponent, E.T. Mensah, brought calypso into the mix and brought the music to a whole new level. But there's been little new to report in Ghana's highlife scene for most of the past two decades.
That fact alone would make these contemporary highlife recordings from Accra, Ghana, newsworthy. The good news is, they're also fantastic, full of the guitar interplay, emotive vocal harmonies, relaxed horn arranging and soulful warmth that made this music a hit in the first place. These nine tracks feature four groups involving both highlife veterans and rare younger musicians with a feel for the style. Alex Konadu and his International Band, from Kumasi, modern capital of the Ashanti State, contribute four selections, including the opener, "Mafe Wo," with its lulling palmwine intro, easy lobe and sunny horn arrangement. This is classic highlife, briskly rendered in a contemporary recording.
The elliptical tug and slide of palmwine guitar with its prominent use of blues-related dominant-seventh chords is a staple here, nowhere more so than on two acoustic tracks by Kwadwo Tawia. Tawia is that rare item, a palmwine player under 40! He combines electric and acoustic guitars, hand percussion and the seldom heard penpensiwa, a Ghanain thumb piano, creating a rich setting for his lithe, expressive voice.
This collection's sweetest vocal hook comes from Prince Osei Kofi, an alumnus of highlife's legendary African Brothers. "Enye Mea," a guitar-driven chugger, really hits home with its rich, tuneful call-response-singing. But the prize for guitar tangling goes to Konadu's band, which evokes Congo music, palmwine, and the countrified chromaticism of Chet Atkins on various songs. Kwaku Abeka's Arcobrass Band deliver the rousing closer, a song with the aggressive pump of Trinidadian soca.
This release puts the lie to the notion that Ghana's highlife is dead. Let's hope there's more where this came from! - Banning Eyre

1. Alex Konadu's International Band - Mafe Wo
2. Alex Konadu's International Band - Medan Wo
3. Kwadwo Tawiah - Otwee Emporo
4. Prince Osei Kofi & His African Heroes - Enye Mea
5. Prince Osei Kofi & His African Heroes - Fine Boy
6. Alex Konadu's International Band - Abrabo
7. Alex Konadu's International Band - Odehyee
8. Kwadwo Tawiah - Me Mere Beba
9. Kwaku Abeka's Arcobrass Band - Odo Ye Owu

320 kbps including full scans

HERE

Sultan Khan - Singing Sarangi

Posted By MiOd On 5:57 AM 0 comments
Sultan Khan
Singing Sarangi, 1988

Zakir Hussain accompanies on tabla. Good performances of "Kaunsi Kanada," "Chandra Madhu," and "Mishra Tilang." The album also includes a tabla solo piece lasting a few seconds short of ten minutes.

1. Raga Kaunsi Kanada (Alap and Gat)
2. Raga Chandra Madhu
3. Tabla Solo (Char Tal Ki Sawari)
4. Raga Mishra Tilang

Sultan Khan - sarangi
Zakir Hussain - tabla

320 kbps including full scans

HERE